The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

Article English OPEN
Wayne Briner (2010)
  • Publisher: MDPI AG
  • Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, volume 7, issue 1, pages 303-313 (issn: 1660-4601, eissn: 1660-4601)
  • Related identifiers: pmc: PMC2819790, doi: 10.3390/ijerph7010303
  • Subject: toxicity | R | Review | heavy metal | depleted uranium | Medicine
    mesheuropmc: complex mixtures | inorganic chemicals | technology, industry, and agriculture

Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.
Share - Bookmark