publication . Article . Other literature type . 2014

Dietary Sources of Methylated Arsenic Species in Urine of the United States Population, NHANES 2003–2010

deCastro, B. Rey; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Jones, Robert L.; Blount, Benjamin C.; Pan, Yi; Ward, Cynthia; Mortensen, Mary E.;
Open Access English
  • Published: 24 Sep 2014 Journal: PLoS ONE (issn: 1932-6203, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Abstract
Background Arsenic is an ubiquitous element linked to carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, as well as adverse respiratory, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and dermal health effects. Objective Identify dietary sources of speciated arsenic: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Methods Age-stratified, sample-weighted regression of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2003–2010 data (∼8,300 participants ≥6 years old) characterized the association between urinary arsenic species and the additional mass consumed of USDA-standardized food groups (24-hour dietary recall data), controlling for potential confounders. Results For all ars...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beverages
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Research Article, Biology and Life Sciences, Nutrition, Diet, Physiology, Physiological Processes, Food Consumption, Toxicology, Toxic Agents, Toxins, Heavy Metals, Medicine and Health Sciences, Epidemiology, Biomarker Epidemiology, Environmental Epidemiology, Health Care, Environmental Health, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Public and Occupational Health, Research and Analysis Methods, Research Design, Survey Research, Surveys, Health Surveys, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Medicine, Food science, Cacodylic acid, chemistry.chemical_compound, chemistry, Food group, Arsenic, chemistry.chemical_element, Environmental exposure, Urine, Biology, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Population, education.field_of_study, education, Dimethylarsinic Acid
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84 references, page 1 of 6

1 IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans (2012) Arsenic, metals, fibres, and dusts. Volume 100 C. A review of human carcinogens. Lyon, France. Available: http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol100C/mono100C.pdf. Accessed 7 November 2011.

2 National Toxicology Program (2011) Arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds. Report on Carcinogens 12th ed. Research Triangle Park, NC. Available: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/twelfth/profiles/Arsenic.pdf. Accessed 2012 November 7.

3 Chen CJ, Hsueh YM, Lai MS, Shyu MP, Ch en SY, et al (1995) Increased prevalence of hypertension and long-term arsenic exposure. Hypertension 25: 53–60.7843753 [PubMed]

4 Jensen GE, Hansen ML (1998) Occupational arsenic exposure and glycosylated haemoglobin. Analyst 123: 77–80.9581024 [PubMed]

5 National Research Council Subcommittee on Arsenic in Drinking Water (1999) Arsenic in Drinking Water. Washington DC. Available: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=6444. Accessed 2012 November 7.

6 Vahidnia A, van der Voet GB, de Wolff FA (2007) Arsenic neurotoxicity–a review. Hum Exp Toxicol 26: 823–832.18025055 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

7 US Environme ntal Protection Agency (2001) NPDES Final arsenic rule. Washington, DC. Available: http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-WATER/2001/January/Day-22/w1668.htm. Accessed 2012 November 7.

8 US Food and Drug Administration (2005) Bottled water quality standards: Arsenic monitoring. Washington, DC. Available: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2005-06-09/pdf/05-11406.pdf. Accessed 2012 November 7.

9 Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (2007) Toxicological profile for arsenic. Atlanta, GA. Available: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/ToxProfiles/tp2.pdf. Accessed 11 June 2013.

10 Apostoli P, Alessio L, Romeo L, Buchet JP, Leone R (1997) Metabolism of arsenic after acute occupational arsine intoxication. J Toxicol Environ Health 52: 331–342.9354178 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Bettley FR, O'Shea JA (1975) The absorption of arsenic and its relation to carcinoma. Br J Dermatol 92: 563–568.1174468 [PubMed]

12 Buchet JP, Lauwerys R, Roels H (1981) Comparison of the urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites after a single oral dose of sodium arsenite, monomethylarsonate, or dimethylarsinate in man. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 48: 71–79.6894292 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

13 Crecelius EA (1977) Changes in the chemical speciation of arsenic following ingestion by man. Environ Health Perspect 19: 147–150.908293 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

14 Mappes R (1977) [Experiments on excretion of arsenic in urine (author's transl)]. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 40: 267–272.598936 [PubMed]

15 Tam GK, Charbonneau SM, Bryce F, Pomroy C, Sandi E (1979) Metabolism of inorganic arsenic (74 As) in humans following oral ingestion. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 50: 319–322.505460 [PubMed]

84 references, page 1 of 6
Related research
Abstract
Background Arsenic is an ubiquitous element linked to carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, as well as adverse respiratory, gastrointestinal, hepatic, and dermal health effects. Objective Identify dietary sources of speciated arsenic: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Methods Age-stratified, sample-weighted regression of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) 2003–2010 data (∼8,300 participants ≥6 years old) characterized the association between urinary arsenic species and the additional mass consumed of USDA-standardized food groups (24-hour dietary recall data), controlling for potential confounders. Results For all ars...
Subjects
Medical Subject Headings: food and beverages
free text keywords: Medicine, R, Science, Q, Research Article, Biology and Life Sciences, Nutrition, Diet, Physiology, Physiological Processes, Food Consumption, Toxicology, Toxic Agents, Toxins, Heavy Metals, Medicine and Health Sciences, Epidemiology, Biomarker Epidemiology, Environmental Epidemiology, Health Care, Environmental Health, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Public and Occupational Health, Research and Analysis Methods, Research Design, Survey Research, Surveys, Health Surveys, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Agricultural and Biological Sciences, General Medicine, Food science, Cacodylic acid, chemistry.chemical_compound, chemistry, Food group, Arsenic, chemistry.chemical_element, Environmental exposure, Urine, Biology, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Population, education.field_of_study, education, Dimethylarsinic Acid
Download fromView all 4 versions
PLoS ONE
Article . 2014
PLoS ONE
Article . 2014
Provider: Crossref
PLoS ONE
Article
Provider: UnpayWall
84 references, page 1 of 6

1 IARC Working Group on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans (2012) Arsenic, metals, fibres, and dusts. Volume 100 C. A review of human carcinogens. Lyon, France. Available: http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol100C/mono100C.pdf. Accessed 7 November 2011.

2 National Toxicology Program (2011) Arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds. Report on Carcinogens 12th ed. Research Triangle Park, NC. Available: http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/twelfth/profiles/Arsenic.pdf. Accessed 2012 November 7.

3 Chen CJ, Hsueh YM, Lai MS, Shyu MP, Ch en SY, et al (1995) Increased prevalence of hypertension and long-term arsenic exposure. Hypertension 25: 53–60.7843753 [PubMed]

4 Jensen GE, Hansen ML (1998) Occupational arsenic exposure and glycosylated haemoglobin. Analyst 123: 77–80.9581024 [PubMed]

5 National Research Council Subcommittee on Arsenic in Drinking Water (1999) Arsenic in Drinking Water. Washington DC. Available: http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=6444. Accessed 2012 November 7.

6 Vahidnia A, van der Voet GB, de Wolff FA (2007) Arsenic neurotoxicity–a review. Hum Exp Toxicol 26: 823–832.18025055 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

7 US Environme ntal Protection Agency (2001) NPDES Final arsenic rule. Washington, DC. Available: http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-WATER/2001/January/Day-22/w1668.htm. Accessed 2012 November 7.

8 US Food and Drug Administration (2005) Bottled water quality standards: Arsenic monitoring. Washington, DC. Available: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2005-06-09/pdf/05-11406.pdf. Accessed 2012 November 7.

9 Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (2007) Toxicological profile for arsenic. Atlanta, GA. Available: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/ToxProfiles/tp2.pdf. Accessed 11 June 2013.

10 Apostoli P, Alessio L, Romeo L, Buchet JP, Leone R (1997) Metabolism of arsenic after acute occupational arsine intoxication. J Toxicol Environ Health 52: 331–342.9354178 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

11 Bettley FR, O'Shea JA (1975) The absorption of arsenic and its relation to carcinoma. Br J Dermatol 92: 563–568.1174468 [PubMed]

12 Buchet JP, Lauwerys R, Roels H (1981) Comparison of the urinary excretion of arsenic metabolites after a single oral dose of sodium arsenite, monomethylarsonate, or dimethylarsinate in man. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 48: 71–79.6894292 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

13 Crecelius EA (1977) Changes in the chemical speciation of arsenic following ingestion by man. Environ Health Perspect 19: 147–150.908293 [OpenAIRE] [PubMed]

14 Mappes R (1977) [Experiments on excretion of arsenic in urine (author's transl)]. Int Arch Occup Environ Health 40: 267–272.598936 [PubMed]

15 Tam GK, Charbonneau SM, Bryce F, Pomroy C, Sandi E (1979) Metabolism of inorganic arsenic (74 As) in humans following oral ingestion. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 50: 319–322.505460 [PubMed]

84 references, page 1 of 6
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