publication . Article . 2011

Characterizing congenital amusia

Lauren Stewart;
Open Access
  • Published: 01 Apr 2011 Journal: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, volume 64, pages 625-638 (issn: 1747-0218, eissn: 1747-0226, Copyright policy)
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Country: United Kingdom
Abstract
<p>The ability to make sense of the music in our environment involves sophisticated cognitive mechanisms that, for most people, are acquired effortlessly and in early life. A special population of individuals, with a disorder termed congenital amusia, report lifelong difficulties in this regard. Exploring the nature of this developmental disorder provides a window onto the cognitive architecture of typical musical processing, as well as allowing a study of the relationship between processing of music and other domains, such as language. The present article considers findings concerning pitch discrimination, pitch memory, contour processing, experiential aspects ...
Subjects
free text keywords: Acoustic Stimulation, Auditory Perceptual Disorders, Humans, Models, Psychological, Music, Pitch Discrimination, Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Physiology (medical), Physiology, General Psychology, Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology, General Medicine, C800, C830, C850
Related Organizations
71 references, page 1 of 5

Allen, G. (1878). Note-deafness. Mind, 10, 57-67.

Ayotte, J., Peretz, I., & Hyde, K. (2002). Congenital amusia: A group study of adults afflicted with a music-specific disorder. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 125(2), 238-251. [OpenAIRE]

Braun, A., McArdle, J., Jones, J., Nechaev, V., Zalewski, C., Brewer, C., et al. (2008). Tune deafness: Processing melodic errors outside of conscious awareness as reflected by components of the auditory ERP. Plos One, 3(6), doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002349.

Critchley, M., & Henson, R. (1977). Music and the brain: Studies in the neurology of music. London, UK: Heinemann.

Cuddy, L. L., Balkwill, L. L., Peretz, I., & Holden, R. R. (2005). Musical difficulties are rare: A study of “tone deafness” among university students. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1060, 311 - 324.

Dalla Bella, S., Giguere, J. F., & Peretz, I. (2009). Singing in congenital amusia. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 126(1), 414-424, doi:10.1121/1.3132504.

Dalla Bella, S., & Peretz, I. (2003). Congenital amusia interferes with the ability to synchronize with music. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 999, 166-169.

DeNora, T. (2000). Music in everyday life. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Deutsch, D. (1970). Tones and numbers: Specificity of interference in immediate memory. Science, 168(3939), 1604-1605, doi:10.1126/science.168.3939.1604. [OpenAIRE]

Dowling, W. J., & Fujitani, D. S. (1971). Contour, interval, and pitch recognition in memory for melodies. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 49(2, Pt. 2), 524-531, doi:10.1121/1.1912382.

Drayna, D., Manichaikul, A., de Lange, M., Snieder, H., & Spector, T. (2001). Genetic correlates of musical pitch recognition in humans. Science, 291(5510), 1969-1972. [OpenAIRE]

Foxton, J. M., Dean, J. L., Gee, R., Peretz, I., & Griffiths, T. D. (2004). Characterization of deficits in pitch perception underlying “tone deafness”. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 127(4), 801-810.

Gaab, N., Gaser, C., Zaehle, T., Jancke, L., & Schlaug, G. (2003). Functional anatomy of pitch memory-an fMRI study with sparse temporal sampling. NeuroImage, 19(4), 1417-1426. [OpenAIRE]

Galaburda, A. M. (2005). Dyslexia-a molecular disorder of neuronal migration: The 2004 Norman Geschwind Memorial Lecture. Annals of Dyslexia, 55(2), 151-165.

Griffiths, T. D., Rees, A., Witton, C., Cross, P. M., Shakir, R. A., & Green, G. G. R. (1997). Spatial and temporal auditory processing deficits following right hemisphere infarction: A psychophysical study. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 120(5), 785-794. [OpenAIRE]

71 references, page 1 of 5
Related research
Abstract
<p>The ability to make sense of the music in our environment involves sophisticated cognitive mechanisms that, for most people, are acquired effortlessly and in early life. A special population of individuals, with a disorder termed congenital amusia, report lifelong difficulties in this regard. Exploring the nature of this developmental disorder provides a window onto the cognitive architecture of typical musical processing, as well as allowing a study of the relationship between processing of music and other domains, such as language. The present article considers findings concerning pitch discrimination, pitch memory, contour processing, experiential aspects ...
Subjects
free text keywords: Acoustic Stimulation, Auditory Perceptual Disorders, Humans, Models, Psychological, Music, Pitch Discrimination, Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Physiology (medical), Physiology, General Psychology, Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology, General Medicine, C800, C830, C850
Related Organizations
71 references, page 1 of 5

Allen, G. (1878). Note-deafness. Mind, 10, 57-67.

Ayotte, J., Peretz, I., & Hyde, K. (2002). Congenital amusia: A group study of adults afflicted with a music-specific disorder. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 125(2), 238-251. [OpenAIRE]

Braun, A., McArdle, J., Jones, J., Nechaev, V., Zalewski, C., Brewer, C., et al. (2008). Tune deafness: Processing melodic errors outside of conscious awareness as reflected by components of the auditory ERP. Plos One, 3(6), doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0002349.

Critchley, M., & Henson, R. (1977). Music and the brain: Studies in the neurology of music. London, UK: Heinemann.

Cuddy, L. L., Balkwill, L. L., Peretz, I., & Holden, R. R. (2005). Musical difficulties are rare: A study of “tone deafness” among university students. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1060, 311 - 324.

Dalla Bella, S., Giguere, J. F., & Peretz, I. (2009). Singing in congenital amusia. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 126(1), 414-424, doi:10.1121/1.3132504.

Dalla Bella, S., & Peretz, I. (2003). Congenital amusia interferes with the ability to synchronize with music. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 999, 166-169.

DeNora, T. (2000). Music in everyday life. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Deutsch, D. (1970). Tones and numbers: Specificity of interference in immediate memory. Science, 168(3939), 1604-1605, doi:10.1126/science.168.3939.1604. [OpenAIRE]

Dowling, W. J., & Fujitani, D. S. (1971). Contour, interval, and pitch recognition in memory for melodies. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 49(2, Pt. 2), 524-531, doi:10.1121/1.1912382.

Drayna, D., Manichaikul, A., de Lange, M., Snieder, H., & Spector, T. (2001). Genetic correlates of musical pitch recognition in humans. Science, 291(5510), 1969-1972. [OpenAIRE]

Foxton, J. M., Dean, J. L., Gee, R., Peretz, I., & Griffiths, T. D. (2004). Characterization of deficits in pitch perception underlying “tone deafness”. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 127(4), 801-810.

Gaab, N., Gaser, C., Zaehle, T., Jancke, L., & Schlaug, G. (2003). Functional anatomy of pitch memory-an fMRI study with sparse temporal sampling. NeuroImage, 19(4), 1417-1426. [OpenAIRE]

Galaburda, A. M. (2005). Dyslexia-a molecular disorder of neuronal migration: The 2004 Norman Geschwind Memorial Lecture. Annals of Dyslexia, 55(2), 151-165.

Griffiths, T. D., Rees, A., Witton, C., Cross, P. M., Shakir, R. A., & Green, G. G. R. (1997). Spatial and temporal auditory processing deficits following right hemisphere infarction: A psychophysical study. Brain: A Journal of Neurology, 120(5), 785-794. [OpenAIRE]

71 references, page 1 of 5
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