publication . Article . 2019

Managing emergencies in primary care: does real-world simulation-based training have any lasting impact?

Forde, Emer; Bromilow, J.; Jackson, S.; Wedderburn, Clare;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Jan 2019
Abstract
General Practitioners (GPs) have a responsibility to provide prompt and effective care when attending to life threatening emergencies in their GP surgeries. Primary care staff undertake mandatory, annual basic life support training. However, most emergencies are peri-arrest situations, and this is an area where GPs lack confidence and competence [1, 2]. The importance of effective, early intervention in peri-arrest scenarios was highlighted by the NCEPOD report “Time to Intervene (2012)” [3]. This report suggested that better early assessment and intervention may have prevented progression to cardiorespiratory arrest. GPs need to be equipped to manage ‘time crit...
Subjects
mesheuropmc: education
Related Organizations

1. Forde, E., Bromilow, J. & Wedderburn, C. The practical management of emergencies in primary care: Taking simulation out of the classroom and into real life environments. British Medical Journal Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning 2017.

2. Ramanayake, R., Ranasingha, S & Lakmini, S. Management of Emergencies in General Practice. Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care 2014; 3(4): 305-308. [OpenAIRE]

3. Findlay, G., Shotton, H., Kelly, K. & Mason, M. Time to Intervene? A review of patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation as a result of an in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A report by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (2012).

4. Eastwick-Field, P. No more tick box resuscitation training: simulation in the surgery. British Journal of General Practice, 2017; 67(654): 25.

5. Strachan, A.N., Graham, A.C., Hormis, A.P., Hilton, G. What were the perceptions of primary care teams on learning from a single multidisciplinary simulation-based training intervention? Education for Primary Care, 2011; 22(4): 229-34.

Abstract
General Practitioners (GPs) have a responsibility to provide prompt and effective care when attending to life threatening emergencies in their GP surgeries. Primary care staff undertake mandatory, annual basic life support training. However, most emergencies are peri-arrest situations, and this is an area where GPs lack confidence and competence [1, 2]. The importance of effective, early intervention in peri-arrest scenarios was highlighted by the NCEPOD report “Time to Intervene (2012)” [3]. This report suggested that better early assessment and intervention may have prevented progression to cardiorespiratory arrest. GPs need to be equipped to manage ‘time crit...
Subjects
mesheuropmc: education
Related Organizations

1. Forde, E., Bromilow, J. & Wedderburn, C. The practical management of emergencies in primary care: Taking simulation out of the classroom and into real life environments. British Medical Journal Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning 2017.

2. Ramanayake, R., Ranasingha, S & Lakmini, S. Management of Emergencies in General Practice. Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care 2014; 3(4): 305-308. [OpenAIRE]

3. Findlay, G., Shotton, H., Kelly, K. & Mason, M. Time to Intervene? A review of patients who underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation as a result of an in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A report by the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (2012).

4. Eastwick-Field, P. No more tick box resuscitation training: simulation in the surgery. British Journal of General Practice, 2017; 67(654): 25.

5. Strachan, A.N., Graham, A.C., Hormis, A.P., Hilton, G. What were the perceptions of primary care teams on learning from a single multidisciplinary simulation-based training intervention? Education for Primary Care, 2011; 22(4): 229-34.

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