publication . Article . 2015

Advice on testing the null hypothesis that a sample is drawn from a Normal distribution.

Graeme D. Ruxton; David M. Wilkinson; Markus Neuhäuser;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Aug 2015
  • Publisher: Elsevier
  • Country: United Kingdom
Abstract
The Normal distribution remains the most widely-used statistical model, so it is only natural that researchers will frequently be required to consider whether a sample of data appears to have been drawn from a Normal distribution. Commonly-used statistical packages offer a range of alternative formal statistical tests of the null hypothesis of Normality, with inference being drawn on the basis of a calculated p-value. Here we aim to review the statistical literature on the performance of these tests, and briefly survey current usage of them in recently-published papers, with a view to offering advice on good practice. We find that authors in animal behaviour see...
Subjects
free text keywords: QH301, Animal Science and Zoology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Statistical hypothesis testing, Test statistic, Sample size determination, Biology, One- and two-tailed tests, Statistics, Null hypothesis, Communication, business.industry, business, Anderson–Darling test, Z-test, p-value
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