publication . Article . 2015

The private life of stops: VOT in a real-time corpus of spontaneous Glaswegian

Stuart-Smith, Jane; Sonderegger, Morgan; Rathcke, Tamara; Macdonald, Rachel;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 Oct 2015
Abstract
<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>While voice onset time (VOT) is known to be sensitive to a range of phonetic and linguistic factors, much less is known about VOT in spontaneous speech, since most studies consider stops in single words, in sentences, and/or in read speech. Scottish English is typically said to show less aspirated voiceless stops than other varieties of English, but there is also variation, ranging from unaspirated stops in vernacular speakers to more aspirated stops in Scottish Standard English; change in the vernacular has also been suggested. This paper presents results from a study which used a fast, semi-automated procedure for analy...
Subjects
free text keywords: stop consonants; spontaneous speech; automatic measurement; sound change; Scottish English, ddc:400, P1, PE, Varieties of English, Communication, business.industry, business, Psychology, Voice-onset time, Aspirated consonant, Scottish English, Vowel, Standard English, Sound change, Place of articulation, Linguistics
Related Organizations

Aitken, A. J. 1984. Scots and English in Scotland. In Peter Trudgill (ed.), Language in the British Isles, 517-532. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Allen, J. Sean, Joanne L. Miller, & David DeSteno. 2003. Individual Talker Differences in Voice-Onset-Time. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113. 544-52.

Auzou, Pascal, Canan, Ozsancak, Richard Morris, Mary Jan, Francis Eustache, & Didier Hannequin. 2000. Voice onset time in aphasia, apraxia of speech and dysarthria: a review. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 14(2). 131-150.

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Abstract
<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>While voice onset time (VOT) is known to be sensitive to a range of phonetic and linguistic factors, much less is known about VOT in spontaneous speech, since most studies consider stops in single words, in sentences, and/or in read speech. Scottish English is typically said to show less aspirated voiceless stops than other varieties of English, but there is also variation, ranging from unaspirated stops in vernacular speakers to more aspirated stops in Scottish Standard English; change in the vernacular has also been suggested. This paper presents results from a study which used a fast, semi-automated procedure for analy...
Subjects
free text keywords: stop consonants; spontaneous speech; automatic measurement; sound change; Scottish English, ddc:400, P1, PE, Varieties of English, Communication, business.industry, business, Psychology, Voice-onset time, Aspirated consonant, Scottish English, Vowel, Standard English, Sound change, Place of articulation, Linguistics
Related Organizations

Aitken, A. J. 1984. Scots and English in Scotland. In Peter Trudgill (ed.), Language in the British Isles, 517-532. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Allen, J. Sean, Joanne L. Miller, & David DeSteno. 2003. Individual Talker Differences in Voice-Onset-Time. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 113. 544-52.

Auzou, Pascal, Canan, Ozsancak, Richard Morris, Mary Jan, Francis Eustache, & Didier Hannequin. 2000. Voice onset time in aphasia, apraxia of speech and dysarthria: a review. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 14(2). 131-150.

POA1:DECADE OF BIRTH1

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