Value Chains of Botanical and Herbal Medicinal Products: A European Perspective

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Booker, A. ; Heinrich, M. (2016)
  • Publisher: American Botanical Council
  • Subject: UOWSAT

In recent years, the quality of botanicals has come under increased scrutiny. Despite the availability of numerous high-quality products from reputable companies, health care professionals, patients, and consumers are understandably concerned about questionable botanical ingredients in various consumer products. In Europe, this includes products that are generally unlicensed and unregistered supplements (also referred to as “botanicals”), which are often poorly regulated, or even totally unregulated, depending on the country of jurisdiction.
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