James Gourley, terrorism and temporality in the works of Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo [2013]

Article, Review English OPEN
Eve, Martin Paul (2013)
  • Publisher: Orbit : Writing Around Pynchon / Sussec University
  • Related identifiers: doi: 10.7766/orbit.v2.1.60
  • Subject: eh | Q320 English Literature

A Review of James Gourley, Terrorism and Temporality in the Works of Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo (2013)
  • References (5)

    1. Peter Boxall, Twenty-First-Century Fiction: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013), p. 214.

    2. In the latter case, Gourley gives two chapters to Against the Day.

    3. Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day (London: Jonathan Cape, 2006), p. 153.

    4. David Cowart, 'The Lady Vanishes: Don DeLillo's Point Omega', Contemporary Literature, 53 (2012), 31-50 (p. 31). In this last case I appreciate that it may have simply been a timing problem, although other 2012 works are cited.

    de Bourcier, Simon, Pynchon and Relativity: Narrative Time in Thomas Pynchon's Later Novels (London: Continuum, 2012) Boxall, Peter, Twenty-First-Century Fiction: A Critical Introduction (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013) Cowart, David, "The Lady Vanishes: Don DeLillo's Point Omega", Contemporary Literature, 53, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1353/cli.2012.0009, pp. 31 - 50 Hume, Kathryn, "The Religious and Political Vision of Pynchon's Against the Day", Philological Quarterly, 86(1/2), 2007 Pynchon, Thomas, Against the Day (New York: Penguin, 2006) Pynchon, Thomas, "Nearer My Couch to Thee", in Deadly Sins (New York: W. Morrow, 1993), pp. 10 - 23

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