Indexing Bob Cranky : social meaning and the voices of pitmen and keelmen in early nineteenth-century Tyneside song

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Hermeston, Rodney;
(2014)

This article examines the social meanings (indexical relations) of Tyneside dialect spoken by pitmen and keelmen in early nineteenth-century Tyneside dialect songs. I focus on the pitman Bob Cranky. Pieces about Bob and other pitmen and keelmen emerge from a song cultur... View more
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