Child-stripping in the Victorian City

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MacRaild, Don; Neal, Frank;
(2012)

During the nineteenth century, police, magistrates, reformers and the press noticed a rising tide of juvenile crime. Child-stripping, the crime of stealing young children's clothes by force or deception, was an activity of this type which caused alarm among contemporari... View more
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    77 references, page 1 of 8

    2 Dombey and Son (1846; London, 1995), 71. Also, M.E. Winchester's Adrift in a Great City (London, 1892).

    3 G. Himmelfarb, The Idea of Poverty: England in the Early Industrial Age (London, 1984), 471.

    4 H. Mayhew, London Labour and the London Poor, 4 vols. (London, 1864), vol. I, 281.

    5 J. McLevy, Casebook of a Victorian Detective, ed. Scott Moncrieff (Edinburgh, 1975), 198, 199, 205.

    6 For an excellent survey, see S. d'Cruze and L.L. Jackson, Women, Crime and Justice in England since 1660 (Basingstoke, 2009).

    7 Glasgow Herald, 15 Jan. 1844, 14 Sep. 1849.

    8 Caledonian Mercury, 1 Oct. 1838.

    9 Jackson's Oxford Journal, 23 Sep. 1843. See also the case of the six times convicted Matilda Smith: Lloyd's Weekly London Newspaper, 19 Jul. 1857; and Louise Nichol and Agnes Johnson of Glasgow who were charged with six cases: Manchester Times, 17 Jun. 1854.

    10 Newcastle Courant, 12 Aug. 1853.

    11 Liverpool Courier, 11 Jul. 1855.

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