Exercise training comprising of single 20-s cycle sprints does not provide a sufficient stimulus for improving maximal aerobic capacity in sedentary individuals

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Songsorn, P. ; Lambeth-Mansell, A. ; Mair, J. L. ; Haggett, M. ; Fitzpatrick, B. L. ; Ruffino, J. ; Holliday, A. ; Metcalfe, R. S. ; Vollaard, N. B. J. (2016)
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Journal: European Journal of Applied Physiology, volume 116, pages 1,511-1,517 (issn: 1439-6319, eissn: 1439-6327)
  • Related identifiers: pmc: PMC4943996, doi: 10.1007/s00421-016-3409-8
  • Subject: Sports sciences | High-intensity interval training | 613 Personal health & safety | Sprint interval | VO2max, High-intensity interval training, SIT, Wingate sprint, Sprint interval | H1 | RC1200 Sports Medicine | Physiology (medical) | Physical activity | Original Article | Wingate sprint | Wellbeing | Orthopedics and Sports Medicine | \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document} V ˙ O 2 max | Sports, Exercise and Health Science Research Group | Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health | SIT

Purpose Sprint interval training (SIT) provides a potent stimulus for improving maximal aerobic capacity (\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max), which is among the strongest markers for future cardiovascular health and premature mortality. Cycling-based SIT protocols involving six or more ‘all-out’ 30-s Wingate sprints per training session improve \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max, but we have recently demonstrated that similar improvements in \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max can be achieved with as few as two 20-s sprints. This suggests that the volume of sprint exercise has limited influence on subsequent training adaptations. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine whether a single 20-s cycle sprint per training session can provide a sufficient stimulus for improving \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max. Methods Thirty sedentary or recreationally active participants (10 men/20 women; mean ± SD age: 24 ± 6 years, BMI: 22.6 ± 4.0 kg m−2, \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max: 33 ± 7 mL kg−1 min−1) were randomised to a training group or a no-intervention control group. Training involved three exercise sessions per week for 4 weeks, consisting of a single 20-s Wingate sprint (no warm-up or cool-down). \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max was determined prior to training and 3 days following the final training session. Results Mean \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max did not significantly change in the training group (2.15 ± 0.62 vs. 2.22 ± 0.64 L min−1) or the control group (2.07 ± 0.69 vs. 2.08 ± 0.68 L min−1; effect of time: P = 0.17; group × time interaction effect: P = 0.26). Conclusion Although we have previously demonstrated that regularly performing two repeated 20-s ‘all-out’ cycle sprints provides a sufficient training stimulus for a robust increase in \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\dot{\text{V}}\text{O}}_{ 2} { \hbox{max} }$$\end{document}V˙O2max, our present study suggests that this is not the case when training sessions are limited to a single sprint.
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