Prospects for Observing and Localizing Gravitational-Wave Transients with Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo

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Abbott, B. P. ; Abbott, R. ; Abbott, T. D. ; Abernathy, M. R. ; Acernese, F. ; Ackley, K. ; Adams, C. ; Adams, T. ; Addesso, P. ; Adhikari, R. X. ; Adya, V. B. ; Affeldt, C. ; Agathos, M. ; Agatsuma, K. ; Aggarwal, N. ; Aguiar, O. D. ; Ain, A. ; Ajith, P. ; Allen, B. ; Allocca, A. ; Altin, P. A. ; Amariutei, D. V. ; Anderson, S. B. ; Anderson, W. G. ; Arai, K. ; Araya, M. C. ; Arceneaux, C. C. ; Areeda, J. S. ; Arnaud, N. ; Arun, K. G. ... view all 943 authors (2016)
  • Publisher: Springer International Publishing
  • Journal: Living Reviews in Relativity (vol: 19)
  • Related identifiers: pmc: PMC5256041, doi: 10.1007/lrr-2016-1
  • Subject: QB | Review Article | Data analysis | Data analysis; Electromagnetic counterparts; Gravitational waves; Gravitational-wave detectors; Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous) | Electromagnetic counterparts | Gravitational waves | Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous) | Gravitational-wave detectors

We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational-wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. We report our findings for gravitational-wave transients, with particular focus on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron-star systems, which are considered the most promising for multi-messenger astronomy. The ability to localize the sources of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and 90% credible regions can be as large as thousands of square degrees when only two sensitive detectors are operational. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 deg[superscript 2] to 20 deg[superscript 2] will require at least three detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ∼ 2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should the third LIGO detector be relocated to India as expected, a significant fraction of gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone. Keywords: Gravitational waves; Gravitational-wave detectors; Electromagnetic counterparts; Data analysis
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