Effectiveness of a tailored training programme in behaviour change counselling for community pharmacists: A pilot study

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Thomas, Trudy ; Passfield, Louis ; Coulton, Simon ; Crone, Diane (2016)
  • Publisher: Elsevier
  • Related identifiers: doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2015.08.004
  • Subject: RS | H1
    mesheuropmc: education | skin and connective tissue diseases | health care economics and organizations | integumentary system

Objective: To undertake a pilot study assessing effectiveness of a tailored training programme in\ud behaviour change counselling (BCC) for community pharmacists on, their competence and confidence in\ud delivering behaviour change consultations, skill retention over time and impact on practice.\ud Methods: Community pharmacists (N = 87) attending Primary Care Trust training were given study\ud information and invited to take part. Baseline BCC competence of consenting pharmacists (n = 17) was\ud assessed using the Behaviour Change Counselling Index (BECCI). Following BCC training, competence was\ud reassessed at 1, 3 and 6 months. Friedman’s test was used to compare median BECCI item scores at\ud baseline and after 6 months. Structured interviews were conducted to assess pharmacists’ confidence in\ud BCC consultations after training.\ud Results: Baseline BECCI scores of 0–2 demonstrated pharmacists had not reached competence threshold.\ud Six months after training, BECCI scores improved significantly from baseline (p < 0.05). Competence in\ud delivering BCC (scores of 3–4) was achieved at 3 months, but lost at 6 months for some items. After\ud training, pharmacists felt confident in delivering BCC.\ud Conclusion: Training pharmacists enabled them to deliver BCC competently and confidently.\ud Practice implications: BCC aligns with pharmacist-patient consultations. It took 3 months to achieve\ud competence. Ongoing support may be needed to maintain competence long-term.
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