publication . Article . 2014

Video Game Use and Cognitive Performance: Does It Vary with the Presence of Problematic Video Game Use?

Collins, Emily; Freeman, Jonathan;
Open Access English
  • Published: 04 Mar 2014
  • Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert
Abstract
Action video game players have been found to outperform nonplayers on a variety of cognitive tasks. However, several failures to replicate these video game player advantages have indicated that this relationship may not be straightforward. Moreover, despite the discovery that problematic video game players do not appear to demonstrate the same superior performance as nonproblematic video game players in relation to multiple object tracking paradigms, this has not been investigated for other tasks. Consequently, this study compared gamers and nongamers in task switching ability, visual short-term memory, mental rotation, enumeration, and flanker interference, as ...
Subjects
acm: ComputingMilieux_PERSONALCOMPUTING
33 references, page 1 of 3

1. Zyda M. From visual simulation to virtual reality to games. IEEE Computer Society 2005; 38:25-32.

2. Green CS, Bavelier D. Action video game modifies visual selective attention. Nature 2003; 423:534-537.

3. Ahissar M, Hochstein S. The spread of attention and learning in feature search: effects of target distribution and task difficulty. Vision Research 2000; 40:1349-1364. [OpenAIRE]

4. Fahle M. Perceptual learning and sensomotor exibility: Cortical plasticity under attentional control? Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological 2005; 364: 313-319.

5. Pashler H, Baylis GC. Procedural learning: 2. Intertrial repetition effects in speeded choice tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning. Memory, and Cognition 1991; 17:33-48.

6. Dye MWG, Green CS, Bavelier D. Increasing speed of processing with action video games. Current Directions in Psychological Science 2009; 18:321-326.

7. Bherer L, Kramer AF, Peterson MS, Colcombe S, Erickson K, Becic E. Training effects on dual task performance: Are there age-related differences in plasticity of attentional control? Psychology and Aging 2005; 20:695-709.

8. Durlach PJ, Kring JP, Bowens LD. Effects of action video game experience on change detection. Military Psychology 2009; 21:24-39.

9. Dye MWG, Green CS, Bavelier D. The development of attention skills in action video game players. Neuropsychologia 2009; 47:1780-1789. [OpenAIRE]

10. Green CS, Bavelier D. Enumeration versus multiple object tracking: the case of action video game players. Cognition 2006; 101:217-245.

11. Quaiserpohl C, Geiser C, Lehmann W. The relationship between computer-game preference, gender, and mentalrotation ability. Personality & Individual Differences 2006; 40:609-619.

12. Feng J, Spence I, Pratt J. Playing an action video game reduces gender differences in spatial cognition. Psychological Science 2007; 18:850-855.

13. Boot WR, Kramer AF, Simons DJ, et al. The effects of video game playing on attention, memory, and executive control. Acta Psychologica 2008; 129:387-398.

14. Andrews G, Murphy K. (2006) Does video-game playing improve executive function? In Vanchevsky MA, ed. Frontiers in cognitive sciences. New York: Nova Science, pp. 145-161.

15. Colzato LS, van Leeuwen PJA, van den Wildenberg WPM, et al. DOOM'd to switch: superior cognitive flexibility in players of first person shooter games. Frontiers in Psychology 2010; 1:1-5.

33 references, page 1 of 3
Abstract
Action video game players have been found to outperform nonplayers on a variety of cognitive tasks. However, several failures to replicate these video game player advantages have indicated that this relationship may not be straightforward. Moreover, despite the discovery that problematic video game players do not appear to demonstrate the same superior performance as nonproblematic video game players in relation to multiple object tracking paradigms, this has not been investigated for other tasks. Consequently, this study compared gamers and nongamers in task switching ability, visual short-term memory, mental rotation, enumeration, and flanker interference, as ...
Subjects
acm: ComputingMilieux_PERSONALCOMPUTING
33 references, page 1 of 3

1. Zyda M. From visual simulation to virtual reality to games. IEEE Computer Society 2005; 38:25-32.

2. Green CS, Bavelier D. Action video game modifies visual selective attention. Nature 2003; 423:534-537.

3. Ahissar M, Hochstein S. The spread of attention and learning in feature search: effects of target distribution and task difficulty. Vision Research 2000; 40:1349-1364. [OpenAIRE]

4. Fahle M. Perceptual learning and sensomotor exibility: Cortical plasticity under attentional control? Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological 2005; 364: 313-319.

5. Pashler H, Baylis GC. Procedural learning: 2. Intertrial repetition effects in speeded choice tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning. Memory, and Cognition 1991; 17:33-48.

6. Dye MWG, Green CS, Bavelier D. Increasing speed of processing with action video games. Current Directions in Psychological Science 2009; 18:321-326.

7. Bherer L, Kramer AF, Peterson MS, Colcombe S, Erickson K, Becic E. Training effects on dual task performance: Are there age-related differences in plasticity of attentional control? Psychology and Aging 2005; 20:695-709.

8. Durlach PJ, Kring JP, Bowens LD. Effects of action video game experience on change detection. Military Psychology 2009; 21:24-39.

9. Dye MWG, Green CS, Bavelier D. The development of attention skills in action video game players. Neuropsychologia 2009; 47:1780-1789. [OpenAIRE]

10. Green CS, Bavelier D. Enumeration versus multiple object tracking: the case of action video game players. Cognition 2006; 101:217-245.

11. Quaiserpohl C, Geiser C, Lehmann W. The relationship between computer-game preference, gender, and mentalrotation ability. Personality & Individual Differences 2006; 40:609-619.

12. Feng J, Spence I, Pratt J. Playing an action video game reduces gender differences in spatial cognition. Psychological Science 2007; 18:850-855.

13. Boot WR, Kramer AF, Simons DJ, et al. The effects of video game playing on attention, memory, and executive control. Acta Psychologica 2008; 129:387-398.

14. Andrews G, Murphy K. (2006) Does video-game playing improve executive function? In Vanchevsky MA, ed. Frontiers in cognitive sciences. New York: Nova Science, pp. 145-161.

15. Colzato LS, van Leeuwen PJA, van den Wildenberg WPM, et al. DOOM'd to switch: superior cognitive flexibility in players of first person shooter games. Frontiers in Psychology 2010; 1:1-5.

33 references, page 1 of 3
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