publication . Article . 2016

‘It is English and there is no alternative’: intersectionality, language and social/organizational differentiation of Polish migrants in the UK

Johansson, Marjana; Śliwa, Martyna;
Open Access English
  • Published: 01 May 2016
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Country: India
Abstract
In this paper, we employ an intersectional approach to explore language as a process of social and organizational differentiation of Polish migrant workers in the UK. In addition to intersectionality, our conceptual framework is informed by a sociolinguistic perspective on globalization, which accounts for the social differentiation produced by language in transnational contexts. Empirically, the paper is based on a qualitative study employing life history interviews. Our findings show that for a migrant worker, the ability to negotiate access to employment and other key institutional settings depends to a large extent on her or his linguistic abilities. However...
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