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UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA

Country: Italy
463 Projects, page 1 of 93
  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 792862
    Overall Budget: 168,277 EURFunder Contribution: 168,277 EUR
    Partners: UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA

    The first gravitational wave (GW) detections by the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) are an historical landmark. These detections opened a completely new window to the Universe and officially marked the beginning of GW astronomy. GWs travel almost unimpeded through the Universe, thus conveying clean information about their sources. This gives us a unique opportunity to test the nonlinear regime of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) to unprecedented levels. Indeed, the GWs detected so far were emitted by the merger of binary black holes (BHs) which are the prototypical sources to investigate gravity in its most extreme regimes. However, the true potential of GW observatories to discover new physics beyond of current knowledge is far from being fully explored. In fact, besides probing the nature of compact objects and testing GR, GW detectors may also revolutionize our understanding of particle physics, dark matter (DM) and even possibly quantum gravity. At small scales, with the advent of precision GW physics we will be probing regions closer to the BH horizon, potentially ruling out or confirming alternatives to BHs that predict corrections at the horizon scale. On the opposite side of the spectrum, GWs may also give us hints about the nature of large scale anomalies, such as the existence of DM. For example, light bosonic fields around compact objects, i.e. BHs and neutron stars (NSs), can trigger superradiant instabilities and emit long-lived monochromatic GWs that can be used to either probe the existence of new particles beyond the Standard Model or, in the absence of detections, impose strong constraints on their masses and couplings. The prime goal of this proposal is to understand what GWs can tell us about fundamental questions such as the nature of compact objects and DM and ultimately to contribute to the recent theoretical efforts in developing the full scientific potential of the newborn field of GW astronomy.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101029204
    Overall Budget: 269,003 EURFunder Contribution: 269,003 EUR
    Partners: UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA

    The analysis of archaeological textiles is a challenging undertaking. These precious remains have been altered to the point that discerning their composition requires the development of high specialised analytical tools, characterized by high sensitivity and great versatility. In different sites, many textiles have been excavated, some well-preserved, some with signs of carbonisation; in some cases, traces of colour are still visible. PARCA project proposes to join forces between dye analysis and proteomics to develop an innovative streamlined protocol that would combine dye and protein analysis in a single extraction to minimise sampling size while maximising the amount of information obtained. It will be achieved through the most up-to-date methodologies and instrumental developments of Liquid Chromatography-Orbitrap-Mass Spectrometry to develop protocols that will be applicable to the most degraded archaeological textiles. The LC-MS data will be correlated with FTIR and SEM analyses, to determine the threshold of protein survival by non-destructive techniques prior to proteomics. The project will be carried out for the first 2 years at the Smithsonian Institution (Washington DC-USA), in the proteomics lab under the supervision of Dr. Caroline Solazzo. The third year, incoming phase, will be carried at Sapienza University of Rome, under the supervision of Prof. Roberta Curini. At the end, archaeological relics from the Mediterranean basin will be analysed, in particular samples from Pompeii and Vesuvian areas and from Greek areas. The success of this project will result in gaining new experience in the analytical characterization of ancient textiles, by enriching my background on dyes with the acquisition of a very high level of skills in the field of proteomics and in high resolution mass spectrometry. This knowledge will allow me to reach a leading profile as independent researcher and to strongly strengthen my position in the field of Cultural Heritage Science.

  • Funder: EC Project Code: 236871
    Partners: UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 680153
    Overall Budget: 1,137,500 EURFunder Contribution: 1,137,500 EUR
    Partners: UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA

    Data Mining algorithms are a cornerstone of today's Internet-related services and products. We aim to tackle some of the most important problems in Data Mining --- our goal is to develop a systematic theoretical understanding of certain simple algorithms that, in spite of being at the core of today's web industry, are not yet well understood in terms of their properties and performances, and to develop new simple algorithms for fundamental problems in this domain that have so far escaped a satisfactory solution.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 843186
    Overall Budget: 269,003 EURFunder Contribution: 269,003 EUR
    Partners: UNIVERSITA DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA

    Various reasons can inspire a travel. Travelling for art implies embracing new challenges, being prone to staying in the limelight and to taking risks, chasing glory, rewards, and money. Throughout the Hellenistic period and beyond, itinerant professionals of literacy and music travelled around Greece for all the above. The endeavours, paths, stories of the “poeti vaganti” -so called after the preliminary study by Guarducci (MAL 1927-1929)- are mainly documented by epigraphy, allowing us to envision a cultural and popular phenomenon that run parallel to court literature. Unknown artists and accomplished intellectuals showed off on all the renowned stages of the Hellenistic centres, delivering their performances at festivals, sacred celebrations, and occasions that gathered audience from the territory and abroad. Although the compositions of itinerant artists are sporadically preserved being mainly intended for oral use, epigraphy provides us a large spectrum of valuable elements leading through the reconstruction of the Hellenistic performative life. The study of inscriptions shows three main osmotic levels allowing us to interpret correctly the data and reach out the essence of the “movement” of itinerant professionals of the arts. The central point of this scenario is Travel, as the title of this project indicates: the expression from a Tanagra epigram (IG VII 530) “ptanois posin”, i.e. with winged feet, enshrines the essence of itinerant arts. Travel leads to disclose Performance, studied by typology and nature, and Travellers, traced in their stories and careers. This project, which obtained the Seal of Excellence in MSCA-IF-GF-2016 and also benefits from a digital version (to be developed with the CHS Harvard University partnership), investigates the “poeti vaganti” phenomenon that captures multiple glimpses of history, performative arts, and society of the Hellenism, while providing a reassessment of the ongoing discourse on cultural production of this period.