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JOHANNES KEPLER UNIVERSITAT LINZ UNIVERSITY OF LIN

UNIVERSITAT LINZ
Country: Austria
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136 Projects, page 1 of 28
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 757931
    Overall Budget: 1,499,980 EURFunder Contribution: 1,499,980 EUR
    Partners: JOHANNES KEPLER UNIVERSITAT LINZ UNIVERSITY OF LIN

    Hydrogels evolved as versatile building blocks of life – we all are in essence gel-embodied soft machines. Drawing inspiration from the diversity found in living creatures, GEL-SYS will develop a set of concepts, materials approaches and design rules for wide ranging classes of soft, hydrogel-based electronic, ionic and photonic devices in three core aims. Aim (A) will pursue a high level of complexity in soft, yet tough biomimetic devices and machines by introducing nature-inspired instant strong bonds between hydrogels and antagonistic materials – from soft and elastic to hard and brittle. Building on these newly developed interfaces, aim (B) will pursue biocompatible hydrogel electronics with iontronic transducers and large area multimodal sensor arrays for a new class of medical tools and health monitors. Aim (C) will foster the current soft revolution of robotics with self-sensing, transparent grippers not occluding objects and workspace. A soft robotic visual system with hydrogel-based adaptive optical elements and ultraflexible photosensor arrays will allow robots to see while grasping. Autonomous operation will be a central question in soft systems, tackled with tough stretchable batteries and energy harvesting from mechanical motion on small and large scales with soft membranes. GEL-SYS will use our experience on soft, “imperceptible” electronics and devices. By fusing this technology platform with tough hydrogels - nature’s most pluripotent ingredient of soft machines - we aim to create the next generation of bionic systems. The envisioned hybrids promise new discoveries in the nonlinear mechanical responses of soft systems, and may allow exploiting triggered elastic instabilities for unconventional locomotion. Exploring soft matter, intimately united with solid materials, will trigger novel concepts for medical equipment, healthcare, consumer electronics, energy harvesting from renewable sources and in robotics, with imminent impact on our society.

  • Funder: EC Project Code: 267589
    Partners: JOHANNES KEPLER UNIVERSITAT LINZ UNIVERSITY OF LIN
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 291429
    Partners: JOHANNES KEPLER UNIVERSITAT LINZ UNIVERSITY OF LIN
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 272089
    Partners: JOHANNES KEPLER UNIVERSITAT LINZ UNIVERSITY OF LIN
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 771193
    Overall Budget: 1,998,000 EURFunder Contribution: 1,998,000 EUR
    Partners: JOHANNES KEPLER UNIVERSITAT LINZ UNIVERSITY OF LIN

    Precise investigation tools for analyzing and manipulating matter down to the scale of single atoms are the eyes, ears and fingers of nanoscience and -engineering. SARF takes these nano-analytical "senses" one next step beyond the present state of the art. SARF is breaking new grounds by enabling spectral fingerprinting of single atoms for elemental identification and intra-molecular chemical analytics with sub-nanometer spatial resolution and operating in vacuum- as well as liquid-phase environments. This presently impossible combination of analytical capabilities simultaneously in a single tool is highly desirable to many diverse fields of nanoscience and technology, where decisive functionality originates from single individual atoms and molecules (e.g. spintronics, sensors, catalysis, medicinal drug development, surface physics, biology, etc.). SARF realizes resonance spectroscopy at giga-Hertz frequencies combined with scanning tunneling microscopy for specific single-atom fingerprinting. Characteristic resonance signals are locally detectable by the probe tip as small changes of conductance that indeed enable elemental and chemical identification. SARF conceives and develops single-atom fingerprinting on a manifold of different systems including magnetic and nonmagnetic metals, semiconductors and, exemplarily, tetrapyrrole-based metal-organic functional molecules. If successful, SARF will provide a controlled, versatile, fast and readily applicable "atom-by-atom" matter analysis, where single atoms are selected and identified one by one in real time and space.