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INFN

ISTITUTO NAZIONALE DI FISICA NUCLEARE
Country: Italy
226 Projects, page 1 of 46
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 804815
    Overall Budget: 1,550,000 EURFunder Contribution: 1,550,000 EUR
    Partners: INFN

    Starting from the original experiment performed by Henry Cavendish more than two centuries ago, the precision determination of the gravitational constant G remains a challenging endeavour. It has been measured about a dozen times over the last 50 years, but the results have varied much more than what would be expected from random and systematic errors. Likely, this is due to the fact that, so far, all the past experiments have relied on macroscopic classical instruments, which could all be governed by uncontrolled mechanical influences. On the other hand, a recent controversial study about correlations between the measured values of G and the variations of the length of day seems to suggest that some other not well-understood effects could be present. MEGANTE will address all these issues by carrying out precision G determinations making use of original experimental strategies based on quantum sensors. Unprecedented accuracy levels will be achieved using cold atoms in free-fall to probe the gravitational field, surpassing thus the state-of-art measurements based on torsion balance and simple pendulum. In parallel, MEGANTE will provide results that go far beyond the pure metrological interest. Indeed, owing the lack of a full understanding of gravity, several theoretical models predict new physics phenomena such violations of the inverse square law or a dependency of the G value from the local density of the matter. These aspects of the gravitational interactions will be thoroughly examined during the project, improving current constrains on those theories. MEGANTE will define a novel paradigm for precision G measurements and experiments on gravitation, paving the way for a final resolution of a two-centuries-old problem in metrology.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 702243
    Overall Budget: 180,277 EURFunder Contribution: 180,277 EUR
    Partners: INFN

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon has revealed its potential to be the cornerstone for beyond the Standard Model searches, since it is one of the most accurately measured quantity in particle physics. Being the Standard Model in a nutshell, is at the cutting edge of the developments in the field. A persistent discrepancy between theory and experiment exists and has triggered two new challenging and expensive experiments at FermiLab and at JPARC which will push the measurement of that quantity to an unprecedented precision of a 0.14 ppm. At that level, differences beyond theoretical uncertainties among theory collaborations are limiting the theory precision. Thus, they must be resolved with an exceptional precision as well to sort out whether the observed departure is and indication of New Physics and to correspond the enormous experimental effort. The project Gm2m aims to provide the theoretical framework to coordinate and elaborate on a continuous and robust update of the Standard Model prediction of this observable through the use of 1) a user-friendly and modern web-page interface that should allow the community to keep track of the exact state-of-the-art calculation and 2) a new reassessment with unparalleled precision of the uncertainties of the Standard Model. The project Gm2m will consider a set of novel approaches for finding a solution to the current theoretical puzzles, which also demands an exhaustive scrutiny of the theoretical uncertainties at the 0.1ppm level. This effort should culminate in a most robust Standard Model prediction up to date. The project Gm2m will become a milestone for particle physics and anticipates a long-lasting impact for the society thanks to an ambitious dissemination plan.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 947715
    Overall Budget: 1,484,850 EURFunder Contribution: 1,484,850 EUR
    Partners: INFN

    The goal of POKER is to establish and demonstrate a new approach to search for light dark matter, based on a missing energy measurement with a positron-beam, active thick-target setup. Light dark matter is the new compelling hypothesis that identifies dark matter with new sub-GeV "Hidden Sector" states, neutral under Standard Model interactions and interfacing with our world through a new force. Accelerator-based searches at the intensity frontier are uniquely suited to explore it. However, current and planned efforts are either limited by the low sensitivity or the high backgrounds. This calls for a major breakthrough in the field. The proposed approach overcomes this challenge. The new technique, based on light dark matter production through positron annihilation on atomic electrons, is characterized by a larger signal yield compared to previously explored reactions, and by a unique signal signature resulting from the underlying reaction dynamics: a peak in the missing energy distribution. The re-analysis of “traditional” electron-beam missing energy results, where low-energy secondary positrons are present, has already shown the potential of this technique. POKER will demonstrate its sensitivity by preparing and running a pilot experiment at the CERN H4 beamline with an optimized detector. The test must fulfill strong requirements: the active thick-target must be capable of detecting each impinging particle at very large (MHz) rate, with excellent energy resolution, and to operate in a high radiation dose environment. POKER will set the basis of the first optimized light dark matter search at a positron-beam facility, enabling sensitivity to a large variety of physics cases, from minimal models to more elaborate Hidden Sectors scenarios - such as the "Strongly Interacting Massive Particles" conjecture. The pilot run itself will explore a currently unknown territory in the Hidden Sector parameters space, strengthening even more the POKER physics case.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 799062
    Overall Budget: 180,277 EURFunder Contribution: 180,277 EUR
    Partners: INFN

    Large international scientific collaborations will face in the near future unprecedented computing and data challenges. The analysis of multi-PetaByte datasets at CMS, ATLAS, LHCb and Alice, the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), requires a global federated infrastructure of distributed computing resources. The HL-LHC, the High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC, is expected to deliver 100 times more data than the LHC, with corresponding increase of event sizes, volumes and complexity. Modern techniques for big data analytics and machine learning (ML) are needed to cope with such unprecedented data stream. Critical areas that will strongly benefit from ML are data analysis, detector operation including calibration and monitoring, and computing operations. Aim of this project is to provide the LHC community with the necessary tools to deploy ML solutions through the use of open cloud technologies such as the INDIGO-DataCloud services. Heterogeneous technologies (systems based on multi-cores, GPUs, ...) and opportunistic resources will be integrated. The developed tools will be experiment-independent to promote the exchange of common solutions among the various LHC experiments. The benefits of such an approach will be demonstrated in a real world use case, the optimization of the computing operations for the CMS experiment. In addition, once available, the tools to deploy ML as a service can be easily transferred to other scientific domains that have the need to treat large data streams.

  • Funder: EC Project Code: 279972
    Partners: INFN