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UCL

Université Catholique de Louvain
Country: Belgium
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530 Projects, page 1 of 106
  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101064452
    Funder Contribution: 191,760 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    In this UCLouvain-based project, Claus A. Andersen will demonstrate the philosophical and historical importance of the “Formalist tradition” in Renaissance philosophy (esp. in the time span ca. 1480–1620). The concepts of identity and distinction are the key components in the “Formalist treatises” that enjoyed vast diffusion during the Renaissance, had roots in Late Medieval scholasticism, esp. in the works of the Franciscan Duns Scotus, and played a significant role in textbooks of scholastic philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries. The Formalists discussed whether their doctrines constituted a discipline of its own, a “science of the formalities” that would correspond to what to-day goes by the name of “formal ontology”. The rise of a new metaphysical discipline needs to be part of what we know about the intellectual culture of the Renaissance. The Formalist tradition has mainly been studied through its strains of influence upon other scholastic currents of the Renaissance, but has not itself attracted the attention it merits. This project is innovative in its identification and elimination of this gap in our knowledge and in its focus on scholastic metaphysics during the Renaissance. The project will be supervised by Prof. Jacob Schmutz (UCLouvain); it is conceived as a part of an endeavor to establish an internationally attractive milieu for studies in Early Modern scholastic philosophy at UCLouvain and thus opens rich opportunities for future cooperation. The applicant and the supervisor share a deep interest in the intellectual culture in Early Modern religious orders and will together curate an exhibition in the Maurits Sabbe Library in Leuven that documents the intellectual culture of the Franciscans in Early Modern Leuven on the background of the wider Franciscan scholastic tradition. The project further includes a practical training programme, research articles, an online catalogue of Formalist literature, and a conference with a proceedings publication.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101043730
    Overall Budget: 2,000,000 EURFunder Contribution: 2,000,000 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    BICROSS is an interdisciplinary project linking Greek, Latin, Syriac, Coptic, Gothic, Armenian and Arabic philology, New Testament textual criticism, manuscript studies, ancient history and digital humanities. Little is known about the bilingual New Testament manuscripts, although translations occur remarkably early. Their physical and textual characteristics, relations, tendencies and impact remain understudied despite their centrality to the understanding of the transmission of the New Testament and its reception in different cultures. For centuries New Testament manuscripts have been studied from a monolingual perspective which has obscured the fact that the textual transmission did not take place solely within the boundaries of a single-language tradition but also across languages. Uncovering and establishing the mutual exchange and cross-language interaction require a new multilingual approach to the New Testament tradition. BICROSS breaks through the current monolingual limitation by shifting the discipline’s focus to the overall New Testament tradition. Accepting the possibility that each variant reading could have had its potential source in a reading from a different language tradition and may likewise have caused a dependent reading in any of the other language traditions breaks new ground. The project’s bold and pioneering cross-language approach brings a fresh perspective to the discipline’s current search for new paradigmatic concepts to explain the relations of New Testament readings and manuscripts at large. BICROSS develops specific digital tools to process the vast and linguistically complicated manuscript data in order to pioneer an examination of the entire New Testament bilingual tradition on a larger scale than has ever been possible. The results will provide new insights into the formation and transmission of New Testament texts and will influence the understanding of historical, cultural and linguistic exchange in the East and West.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101067759
    Funder Contribution: 191,760 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    Learning continually from non-stationary streams of data is a key feature of natural intelligence, but an unsolved problem in deep learning. Particularly challenging for deep neural networks is the problem of "class-incremental learning", whereby a network must learn to distinguish classes that are not observed together. In deep learning, the default approach to classification is learning discriminative classifiers. This works great in the i.i.d. setting when all classes are available simultaneously, but when new classes must be learned incrementally, successful training of discriminative classifiers depends on workarounds such as storing data or generative replay. In a radical shift of gears, here I propose to instead address class-incremental learning with generative classification. Key advantage is that generative classifiers – unlike discriminative classifiers – do not compare classes during training, but only during inference (i.e., when making a classification decision). As a proof-of-concept, in preliminary work I showed that a naïve implementation of a generative classifier, with a separate variational autoencoder model per class and likelihood estimation through importance sampling, outperforms comparable generative replay methods. To improve the efficiency, scalability, and performance of this generative classifier, I propose four further modifications: (1) move the generative modelling objective from the raw inputs to an intermediate network layer; (2) share the encoder network between classes, but not necessarily the decoder networks; (3) use fewer importance samples for unlikely classes; and (4) make classification decisions hierarchical. This way, during my MSCA fellowship hosted in the group of Prof Tinne Tuytelaars, I hope to develop generative classification into a practical, efficient, and scalable state-of-the-art deep learning method for class-incremental learning.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101064686
    Funder Contribution: 191,760 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    Making dimethyl ether (DME) from hydrogenating CO2 has attracted great interest as DME is a good propellant, coolant and clean fuel. This process can break the thermodynamic restriction that exists for methanol synthesis from CO2 and improve the conversion of main greenhouse gas. The synthesis of well-controlled shapes of solid materials in nano-size using ionic liquid (IL) solvents has received tremendous attention by taking advantage of their extraordinary properties. However, the remarkably high viscosity, which makes dispersing the support into the IL a major challenge, has limited their usage to the synthesis of un-supported nanoparticles. As an MSCA fellow, I will receive crucial training at KU Leuven and will work on developing a novel process for the synthesis of supported non-precious metal catalyst using IL. I will synthesize two generations of supported catalysts using novel synthesis procedures. I will produce the one-pot generation (OPG) catalyst by one-pot synthesis of support (zeolite) and metal oxide, whereas the well-structured generation (WSG) catalyst will be made by synthesizing zeolite using the IL as a co-solvent. For the OPG catalyst, both support and metal oxide will be synthesized simultaneously, while for the WSG catalyst, the IL that is used in zeolite synthesis will be re-used to engineer the metal oxide shape. Interestingly, to date the structure sensitivity of the CO2 hydrogenation to methanol and its coupling to DME has not been investigated. I will implement the new catalyst methodology to enhance the catalytic activity and selectivity of CO2 conversion to produce DME and establish synthesis-structure-activity relations.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 752179
    Overall Budget: 172,800 EURFunder Contribution: 172,800 EUR
    Partners: UCL

    The Project explores the fundamental social question of the creation of value, by investigating House Societies in Bronze Age Crete (3100-1200 BC). Houses are understood as intergenerational, locus-bound social groups, holding an estate of material and symbolic wealth, transmitted along a real or imaginary line, legitimized by kinship or affinity, or both. Because of their distinct focus on the creation and transmission of value, Houses are an ideal framework for answering this research question, but their longevity makes it difficult to explain change. By fusing Houses with the philosophical and sociological premises of Assemblage theory, which argues that social entities are not fixed but constituted by relationships between humans, non-humans and materials that can territorialize and deterritorialize value, the project creates a new social ontology which perceives Houses in a constant state of becoming, continuously affecting and being affected by the changing social world they inhabit. The methodological advantage of this interdisciplinary model, combining philosophical, sociological, archaeological and scientific perspectives, will be demonstrated empirically through the integrated use of GIS spatial analysis and material culture analysis, in a series of case studies (selected on the basis of availability of good contextual information for primary data and a large corpus of published evidence) targeting three strategic scales of House formation and interaction: a single site (Petras), its regional context (East Crete) and their broader geopolitical networks (the Aegean and the East Mediterranean). Using GIS to explore Houses as Assemblages will offer an original integration of spatial, material and social scales, which can revitalize our understanding of past societies and transform the study of social relations in general.