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  • Publication . Report . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barbot, Laure; Roi, Arnaud; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Durco, Matej; Fischer, Frank; Kalman, Tibor; Moranville, Yoann; Parkola, Tomasz; Garnett, Vicky; Edmond, Jennifer; +1 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: France, Netherlands

    This white paper primarily served as an internal working document for the DARIAH ERIC. We inspected current service policies and practices across ERIC’s with an emphasis on social sciences and humanities. We summarised earlier analysis of the DARIAH service portfolio. The ultimate purpose of the paper was to create a common ground of understanding what DARIAH services are and how to develop governance and management around them. Still, when writing this paper, we realised that others might encounter similar questions in their quest, and so could learn from our exploration.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barbot, Laure; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Gray, Edward; Edmond, Jennifer; Morselli, Francesca; Roi, Arnaud; Admiraal, Femmy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    In Digital Humanities we are accustomed to think about tools as a means to tell a story, whether it be a story about artefacts, events, or patterns in the past. This paper looks at it from the other end, namely that each tool comes with its own story. When we group tools together for means of dissemination, re-use, and accountability in the coordination of an infrastructure we are also telling a story. Certain selected ensembles of tools, which encompass and supersede the individual stories of the tools, create a story of their own. In this paper we take as a case various tools reporting efforts in DARIAH (from the DARIAH contribution website (IKCT), to the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to the SSH Marketplace (MP)). We reflect which story is told by whom, for whom, and for what purpose. Doing so, we build on the fact that the stories that tools tell not only shape the (DH) field in which they are built, but are also products and artefacts reflecting the priorities and the technological choices made by the communities building them. (Barbot, 2019; Scharnhorst et al., 2019; König and Uytvanck, 2020; Ďurčo et al. 2021) Reflecting about tools and their lifecycle is not new: some are success stories, some are encompassing failures (Dombrowski, 2014); some are collective stories, while others are more personal ones. Interestingly, and maybe increasingly so, we see a growing emphasis on the need to provide context to tools, particularly in their documentation and registration - not in the least as a means to encourage sustainability and re-use. Still, in practice, we see a co-existence of various ‘documentation streams’. In this paper, we articulate the stories behind various documentation streams that have been designed and are now being executed in DARIAH. With the IKCT, administrative and technical descriptions are centralized; the more recent KPIs put emphasis on DARIAH’s outreach and impact and the even fresher MP targets the functioning of DARIAH-related tools as part of the EOSC landscape. By making the stories around those specific ensembles of tools visible, we shed light on the different communities, stakeholders and their interests, relying on earlier debates around DARIAH’s reference architecture (Barbot et al, 2021, De Leeuw et al, 2017). We also reflect how the different stories mimic the changing strategies of DARIAH and the maturity of tools and services in it. In practice, we see sometimes the same tools figure in different stories, or even making a ‘career’ between different types of storytelling, but we also see new types of tools emerging. Documentation is never a pure administrative act (Hackman 2009, Smiraglia 2014). By unravelling the ‘secret stories tools whisper in the infrastructure’ when being documented, we raise further awareness why we document what in which form. Ultimately, the reflective layer contributes to a more effective documentation. Therefore, we hope to give guidance to the storytellers, to those which tell the story of one tool, and those which tell the stories of ensembles of them. References: Barbot, L., Roi, A., Scharnhorst, A., Durco, M., Fischer, F., Kalman, T., Moranville, Y., Parkola, T., Garnett, V., Edmond, J., & Toth-Czifra, E. (2021). Towards a concise DARIAH service strategy: 2020 Reflections - White Paper. https://doi.org/10.5281/ZENODO.4621287 Barbot, L., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., & Pozdniakov, I. (2019). Which DH tools are actually used in research?Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/ Permalink Https://Web.Archive.Org/Web/20220222114745/Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/. De Leeuw, L. Admiraal, F., Ďurčo, M., Larousse, N., Mertens, M., Morselli, F., Priddy, M., Ribbe, P., Thiel, C., Wieneke, L. (2017) D5.1 Report on Integrated Service!Needs: DARIAH (in kind) contributions - Concept and Procedures. DARIAH. Humanities at Scale project. ⟨hal-01628733v2⟩ Dombrowski, Q. (2014). What Ever Happened to Project Bamboo? Literary and Linguistic Computing, 29(3), 326–339. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqu026 Ďurčo, M., Barbot, L., Illmayer, K., Karampatakis, S., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., Ocansey, J. T., Probst, S., Kozak, M., Buddenbohm, S., & Yim, S.-B. (2021). 7.2 Marketplace – Implementation. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5749465 Hackman, L. (2009). The Origins of Documentation Strategies in Context: Recollections and Reflections. The American Archivist, 72(2), 436–459. https://doi.org/10.17723/aarc.72.2.g401052h82h12pm3 König, A., & Uytvanck, D. V. (2020). D7.3 Marketplace—Interoperability. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5871651 Scharnhorst, A., Admiraal, F., Roorda, D. (2019) DARIAH (in-kind) contributions: a visual walk-through. DARIAH Annual Event 2019: Humanities Data, May 2019, Warsaw, Poland. ⟨hal-02196707⟩ Smiraglia, R. P. (2014). Cultural Synergy in Information Institutions. Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1249-0

  • Publication . Conference object
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barbot, Laure; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Gray, Edward; Edmond, Jennifer; Morselli, Francesca; Roi, Arnaud; Admiraal, Femmy;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    In Digital Humanities we are accustomed to think about tools as a means to tell a story, whether it be a story about artefacts, events, or patterns in the past. This paper looks at it from the other end, namely that each tool comes with its own story. When we group tools together for means of dissemination, re-use, and accountability in the coordination of an infrastructure we are also telling a story. Certain selected ensembles of tools, which encompass and supersede the individual stories of the tools, create a story of their own. In this paper we take as a case various tools reporting efforts in DARIAH (from the DARIAH contribution website (IKCT), to the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to the SSH Marketplace (MP)). We reflect which story is told by whom, for whom, and for what purpose. Doing so, we build on the fact that the stories that tools tell not only shape the (DH) field in which they are built, but are also products and artefacts reflecting the priorities and the technological choices made by the communities building them. (Barbot, 2019; Scharnhorst et al., 2019; König and Uytvanck, 2020; Ďurčo et al. 2021) Reflecting about tools and their lifecycle is not new: some are success stories, some are encompassing failures (Dombrowski, 2014); some are collective stories, while others are more personal ones. Interestingly, and maybe increasingly so, we see a growing emphasis on the need to provide context to tools, particularly in their documentation and registration - not in the least as a means to encourage sustainability and re-use. Still, in practice, we see a co-existence of various ‘documentation streams’. In this paper, we articulate the stories behind various documentation streams that have been designed and are now being executed in DARIAH. With the IKCT, administrative and technical descriptions are centralized; the more recent KPIs put emphasis on DARIAH’s outreach and impact and the even fresher MP targets the functioning of DARIAH-related tools as part of the EOSC landscape. By making the stories around those specific ensembles of tools visible, we shed light on the different communities, stakeholders and their interests, relying on earlier debates around DARIAH’s reference architecture (Barbot et al, 2021, De Leeuw et al, 2017). We also reflect how the different stories mimic the changing strategies of DARIAH and the maturity of tools and services in it. In practice, we see sometimes the same tools figure in different stories, or even making a ‘career’ between different types of storytelling, but we also see new types of tools emerging. Documentation is never a pure administrative act (Hackman 2009, Smiraglia 2014). By unravelling the ‘secret stories tools whisper in the infrastructure’ when being documented, we raise further awareness why we document what in which form. Ultimately, the reflective layer contributes to a more effective documentation. Therefore, we hope to give guidance to the storytellers, to those which tell the story of one tool, and those which tell the stories of ensembles of them. References: Barbot, L., Roi, A., Scharnhorst, A., Durco, M., Fischer, F., Kalman, T., Moranville, Y., Parkola, T., Garnett, V., Edmond, J., & Toth-Czifra, E. (2021). Towards a concise DARIAH service strategy: 2020 Reflections - White Paper. https://doi.org/10.5281/ZENODO.4621287 Barbot, L., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., & Pozdniakov, I. (2019). Which DH tools are actually used in research?Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/ Permalink Https://Web.Archive.Org/Web/20220222114745/Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/. De Leeuw, L. Admiraal, F., Ďurčo, M., Larousse, N., Mertens, M., Morselli, F., Priddy, M., Ribbe, P., Thiel, C., Wieneke, L. (2017) D5.1 Report on Integrated Service!Needs: DARIAH (in kind) contributions - Concept and Procedures. DARIAH. Humanities at Scale project. ⟨hal-01628733v2⟩ Dombrowski, Q. (2014). What Ever Happened to Project Bamboo? Literary and Linguistic Computing, 29(3), 326–339. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqu026 Ďurčo, M., Barbot, L., Illmayer, K., Karampatakis, S., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., Ocansey, J. T., Probst, S., Kozak, M., Buddenbohm, S., & Yim, S.-B. (2021). 7.2 Marketplace – Implementation. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5749465 Hackman, L. (2009). The Origins of Documentation Strategies in Context: Recollections and Reflections. The American Archivist, 72(2), 436–459. https://doi.org/10.17723/aarc.72.2.g401052h82h12pm3 König, A., & Uytvanck, D. V. (2020). D7.3 Marketplace—Interoperability. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5871651 Scharnhorst, A., Admiraal, F., Roorda, D. (2019) DARIAH (in-kind) contributions: a visual walk-through. DARIAH Annual Event 2019: Humanities Data, May 2019, Warsaw, Poland. ⟨hal-02196707⟩ Smiraglia, R. P. (2014). Cultural Synergy in Information Institutions. Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1249-0

Include:
3 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Publication . Report . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barbot, Laure; Roi, Arnaud; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Durco, Matej; Fischer, Frank; Kalman, Tibor; Moranville, Yoann; Parkola, Tomasz; Garnett, Vicky; Edmond, Jennifer; +1 more
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: France, Netherlands

    This white paper primarily served as an internal working document for the DARIAH ERIC. We inspected current service policies and practices across ERIC’s with an emphasis on social sciences and humanities. We summarised earlier analysis of the DARIAH service portfolio. The ultimate purpose of the paper was to create a common ground of understanding what DARIAH services are and how to develop governance and management around them. Still, when writing this paper, we realised that others might encounter similar questions in their quest, and so could learn from our exploration.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barbot, Laure; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Gray, Edward; Edmond, Jennifer; Morselli, Francesca; Roi, Arnaud; Admiraal, Femmy;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Netherlands

    In Digital Humanities we are accustomed to think about tools as a means to tell a story, whether it be a story about artefacts, events, or patterns in the past. This paper looks at it from the other end, namely that each tool comes with its own story. When we group tools together for means of dissemination, re-use, and accountability in the coordination of an infrastructure we are also telling a story. Certain selected ensembles of tools, which encompass and supersede the individual stories of the tools, create a story of their own. In this paper we take as a case various tools reporting efforts in DARIAH (from the DARIAH contribution website (IKCT), to the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to the SSH Marketplace (MP)). We reflect which story is told by whom, for whom, and for what purpose. Doing so, we build on the fact that the stories that tools tell not only shape the (DH) field in which they are built, but are also products and artefacts reflecting the priorities and the technological choices made by the communities building them. (Barbot, 2019; Scharnhorst et al., 2019; König and Uytvanck, 2020; Ďurčo et al. 2021) Reflecting about tools and their lifecycle is not new: some are success stories, some are encompassing failures (Dombrowski, 2014); some are collective stories, while others are more personal ones. Interestingly, and maybe increasingly so, we see a growing emphasis on the need to provide context to tools, particularly in their documentation and registration - not in the least as a means to encourage sustainability and re-use. Still, in practice, we see a co-existence of various ‘documentation streams’. In this paper, we articulate the stories behind various documentation streams that have been designed and are now being executed in DARIAH. With the IKCT, administrative and technical descriptions are centralized; the more recent KPIs put emphasis on DARIAH’s outreach and impact and the even fresher MP targets the functioning of DARIAH-related tools as part of the EOSC landscape. By making the stories around those specific ensembles of tools visible, we shed light on the different communities, stakeholders and their interests, relying on earlier debates around DARIAH’s reference architecture (Barbot et al, 2021, De Leeuw et al, 2017). We also reflect how the different stories mimic the changing strategies of DARIAH and the maturity of tools and services in it. In practice, we see sometimes the same tools figure in different stories, or even making a ‘career’ between different types of storytelling, but we also see new types of tools emerging. Documentation is never a pure administrative act (Hackman 2009, Smiraglia 2014). By unravelling the ‘secret stories tools whisper in the infrastructure’ when being documented, we raise further awareness why we document what in which form. Ultimately, the reflective layer contributes to a more effective documentation. Therefore, we hope to give guidance to the storytellers, to those which tell the story of one tool, and those which tell the stories of ensembles of them. References: Barbot, L., Roi, A., Scharnhorst, A., Durco, M., Fischer, F., Kalman, T., Moranville, Y., Parkola, T., Garnett, V., Edmond, J., & Toth-Czifra, E. (2021). Towards a concise DARIAH service strategy: 2020 Reflections - White Paper. https://doi.org/10.5281/ZENODO.4621287 Barbot, L., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., & Pozdniakov, I. (2019). Which DH tools are actually used in research?Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/ Permalink Https://Web.Archive.Org/Web/20220222114745/Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/. De Leeuw, L. Admiraal, F., Ďurčo, M., Larousse, N., Mertens, M., Morselli, F., Priddy, M., Ribbe, P., Thiel, C., Wieneke, L. (2017) D5.1 Report on Integrated Service!Needs: DARIAH (in kind) contributions - Concept and Procedures. DARIAH. Humanities at Scale project. ⟨hal-01628733v2⟩ Dombrowski, Q. (2014). What Ever Happened to Project Bamboo? Literary and Linguistic Computing, 29(3), 326–339. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqu026 Ďurčo, M., Barbot, L., Illmayer, K., Karampatakis, S., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., Ocansey, J. T., Probst, S., Kozak, M., Buddenbohm, S., & Yim, S.-B. (2021). 7.2 Marketplace – Implementation. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5749465 Hackman, L. (2009). The Origins of Documentation Strategies in Context: Recollections and Reflections. The American Archivist, 72(2), 436–459. https://doi.org/10.17723/aarc.72.2.g401052h82h12pm3 König, A., & Uytvanck, D. V. (2020). D7.3 Marketplace—Interoperability. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5871651 Scharnhorst, A., Admiraal, F., Roorda, D. (2019) DARIAH (in-kind) contributions: a visual walk-through. DARIAH Annual Event 2019: Humanities Data, May 2019, Warsaw, Poland. ⟨hal-02196707⟩ Smiraglia, R. P. (2014). Cultural Synergy in Information Institutions. Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1249-0

  • Publication . Conference object
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barbot, Laure; Scharnhorst, Andrea; Gray, Edward; Edmond, Jennifer; Morselli, Francesca; Roi, Arnaud; Admiraal, Femmy;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    In Digital Humanities we are accustomed to think about tools as a means to tell a story, whether it be a story about artefacts, events, or patterns in the past. This paper looks at it from the other end, namely that each tool comes with its own story. When we group tools together for means of dissemination, re-use, and accountability in the coordination of an infrastructure we are also telling a story. Certain selected ensembles of tools, which encompass and supersede the individual stories of the tools, create a story of their own. In this paper we take as a case various tools reporting efforts in DARIAH (from the DARIAH contribution website (IKCT), to the Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to the SSH Marketplace (MP)). We reflect which story is told by whom, for whom, and for what purpose. Doing so, we build on the fact that the stories that tools tell not only shape the (DH) field in which they are built, but are also products and artefacts reflecting the priorities and the technological choices made by the communities building them. (Barbot, 2019; Scharnhorst et al., 2019; König and Uytvanck, 2020; Ďurčo et al. 2021) Reflecting about tools and their lifecycle is not new: some are success stories, some are encompassing failures (Dombrowski, 2014); some are collective stories, while others are more personal ones. Interestingly, and maybe increasingly so, we see a growing emphasis on the need to provide context to tools, particularly in their documentation and registration - not in the least as a means to encourage sustainability and re-use. Still, in practice, we see a co-existence of various ‘documentation streams’. In this paper, we articulate the stories behind various documentation streams that have been designed and are now being executed in DARIAH. With the IKCT, administrative and technical descriptions are centralized; the more recent KPIs put emphasis on DARIAH’s outreach and impact and the even fresher MP targets the functioning of DARIAH-related tools as part of the EOSC landscape. By making the stories around those specific ensembles of tools visible, we shed light on the different communities, stakeholders and their interests, relying on earlier debates around DARIAH’s reference architecture (Barbot et al, 2021, De Leeuw et al, 2017). We also reflect how the different stories mimic the changing strategies of DARIAH and the maturity of tools and services in it. In practice, we see sometimes the same tools figure in different stories, or even making a ‘career’ between different types of storytelling, but we also see new types of tools emerging. Documentation is never a pure administrative act (Hackman 2009, Smiraglia 2014). By unravelling the ‘secret stories tools whisper in the infrastructure’ when being documented, we raise further awareness why we document what in which form. Ultimately, the reflective layer contributes to a more effective documentation. Therefore, we hope to give guidance to the storytellers, to those which tell the story of one tool, and those which tell the stories of ensembles of them. References: Barbot, L., Roi, A., Scharnhorst, A., Durco, M., Fischer, F., Kalman, T., Moranville, Y., Parkola, T., Garnett, V., Edmond, J., & Toth-Czifra, E. (2021). Towards a concise DARIAH service strategy: 2020 Reflections - White Paper. https://doi.org/10.5281/ZENODO.4621287 Barbot, L., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., & Pozdniakov, I. (2019). Which DH tools are actually used in research?Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/ Permalink Https://Web.Archive.Org/Web/20220222114745/Https://Weltliteratur.Net/Dh-Tools-Used-in-Research/. De Leeuw, L. Admiraal, F., Ďurčo, M., Larousse, N., Mertens, M., Morselli, F., Priddy, M., Ribbe, P., Thiel, C., Wieneke, L. (2017) D5.1 Report on Integrated Service!Needs: DARIAH (in kind) contributions - Concept and Procedures. DARIAH. Humanities at Scale project. ⟨hal-01628733v2⟩ Dombrowski, Q. (2014). What Ever Happened to Project Bamboo? Literary and Linguistic Computing, 29(3), 326–339. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqu026 Ďurčo, M., Barbot, L., Illmayer, K., Karampatakis, S., Fischer, F., Moranville, Y., Ocansey, J. T., Probst, S., Kozak, M., Buddenbohm, S., & Yim, S.-B. (2021). 7.2 Marketplace – Implementation. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5749465 Hackman, L. (2009). The Origins of Documentation Strategies in Context: Recollections and Reflections. The American Archivist, 72(2), 436–459. https://doi.org/10.17723/aarc.72.2.g401052h82h12pm3 König, A., & Uytvanck, D. V. (2020). D7.3 Marketplace—Interoperability. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5871651 Scharnhorst, A., Admiraal, F., Roorda, D. (2019) DARIAH (in-kind) contributions: a visual walk-through. DARIAH Annual Event 2019: Humanities Data, May 2019, Warsaw, Poland. ⟨hal-02196707⟩ Smiraglia, R. P. (2014). Cultural Synergy in Information Institutions. Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1249-0

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