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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    L. Morrison; L. Wiffen; Paul Meredith; Thomas Brown; L. D’Cruz; Anoop Chauhan;
    Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and British Thoracic Society

    Introduction UK public health policy emphasises the need for increased influenza vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there are claims on social media that influenza vaccination increases risk of adverse outcomes in SARS-CoV-2 infection that may compromise uptake, especially in high risk groups such as those with airways disease. There is also emerging evidence that inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may modify this risk. We therefore sought to urgently assess the risk of morbidity and mortality in individuals admitted with COVID-19, and whether this influenced by influenza vaccination, airways disease and ICS use. Method We examined data in patients admitted to a large acute hospital with microbiologically proven COVID-19 infection (positive PCR) between 23/01/2020 to 21/06/2020. Demographic and outcome data was extracted from discharge summaries, death certificates and electronic patient records. Multiple logistic regressions was performed using STATA version 12, and results for inpatient mortality expressed as odds ratios, and length of stay (morbidity) as coefficients with 95% CIs. Results 525 patients were hospitalised with COVID-19 of whom 451 had a vaccination record available and 64% had been vaccinated. 22% had airways disease (10% asthma, 12% COPD) and 17.5% were on an inhaled corticosteroid. Increasing age (OR=1.04 [1.02, 1.05], p Conclusions Advancing age and male gender increased the risk of in-hospital mortality from COVID-19. Furthermore previous influenza vaccination and the presence of airways disease and/or the use of ICS did not impact morbidity or mortality. Whilst this requires replication using national data sets, it is reassuring data from a single centre that supports the current public health message.

Include:
1 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    L. Morrison; L. Wiffen; Paul Meredith; Thomas Brown; L. D’Cruz; Anoop Chauhan;
    Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and British Thoracic Society

    Introduction UK public health policy emphasises the need for increased influenza vaccination during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there are claims on social media that influenza vaccination increases risk of adverse outcomes in SARS-CoV-2 infection that may compromise uptake, especially in high risk groups such as those with airways disease. There is also emerging evidence that inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) may modify this risk. We therefore sought to urgently assess the risk of morbidity and mortality in individuals admitted with COVID-19, and whether this influenced by influenza vaccination, airways disease and ICS use. Method We examined data in patients admitted to a large acute hospital with microbiologically proven COVID-19 infection (positive PCR) between 23/01/2020 to 21/06/2020. Demographic and outcome data was extracted from discharge summaries, death certificates and electronic patient records. Multiple logistic regressions was performed using STATA version 12, and results for inpatient mortality expressed as odds ratios, and length of stay (morbidity) as coefficients with 95% CIs. Results 525 patients were hospitalised with COVID-19 of whom 451 had a vaccination record available and 64% had been vaccinated. 22% had airways disease (10% asthma, 12% COPD) and 17.5% were on an inhaled corticosteroid. Increasing age (OR=1.04 [1.02, 1.05], p Conclusions Advancing age and male gender increased the risk of in-hospital mortality from COVID-19. Furthermore previous influenza vaccination and the presence of airways disease and/or the use of ICS did not impact morbidity or mortality. Whilst this requires replication using national data sets, it is reassuring data from a single centre that supports the current public health message.

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