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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefano Mammola; Diego Fontaneto; Alejandro Martínez; Filipe Chichorro;
    Publisher: Springer, Budapest , Ungheria
    Countries: Italy, Finland

    AbstractMany believe that the quality of a scientific publication is as good as the science it cites. However, quantifications of how features of reference lists affect citations remain sparse. We examined seven numerical characteristics of reference lists of 50,878 research articles published in 17 ecological journals between 1997 and 2017. Over this period, significant changes occurred in reference lists’ features. On average, more recent papers have longer reference lists and cite more high Impact Factor papers and fewer non-journal publications. We also show that highly cited articles across the ecological literature have longer reference lists, cite more recent and impactful references, and include more self-citations. Conversely, the proportion of ‘classic’ papers and non-journal publications cited, as well as the temporal span of the reference list, have no significant influence on articles’ citations. From this analysis, we distill a recipe for crafting impactful reference lists, at least in ecology.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mammola, Stefano; Martínez, Alejandro; Fontaneto, Diego; Chichorro, Filipe;
    Publisher: figshare

    The database (tab-delimited file) and R script to generate the analysis in the study:Mammola, S., Martinez, A., Fontaneto, D., & Chichorro, F. (2020). Scientometric correlates of high-quality reference lists in ecological papers. Scientometrics, in press. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-020-03759-0 Note that the database was constructed based on a raw database downloaded from Web of Science (see main text for details).

Include:
2 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stefano Mammola; Diego Fontaneto; Alejandro Martínez; Filipe Chichorro;
    Publisher: Springer, Budapest , Ungheria
    Countries: Italy, Finland

    AbstractMany believe that the quality of a scientific publication is as good as the science it cites. However, quantifications of how features of reference lists affect citations remain sparse. We examined seven numerical characteristics of reference lists of 50,878 research articles published in 17 ecological journals between 1997 and 2017. Over this period, significant changes occurred in reference lists’ features. On average, more recent papers have longer reference lists and cite more high Impact Factor papers and fewer non-journal publications. We also show that highly cited articles across the ecological literature have longer reference lists, cite more recent and impactful references, and include more self-citations. Conversely, the proportion of ‘classic’ papers and non-journal publications cited, as well as the temporal span of the reference list, have no significant influence on articles’ citations. From this analysis, we distill a recipe for crafting impactful reference lists, at least in ecology.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mammola, Stefano; Martínez, Alejandro; Fontaneto, Diego; Chichorro, Filipe;
    Publisher: figshare

    The database (tab-delimited file) and R script to generate the analysis in the study:Mammola, S., Martinez, A., Fontaneto, D., & Chichorro, F. (2020). Scientometric correlates of high-quality reference lists in ecological papers. Scientometrics, in press. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11192-020-03759-0 Note that the database was constructed based on a raw database downloaded from Web of Science (see main text for details).

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