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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arena, Francesca;
    Publisher: Le Mans Université
    Country: Switzerland

    Almost entirely overlooked throughout the 20th century, neglected by contemporary medical manuals, the clitoris has gradually returned centre stage thanks to Western feminism.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Torres del Rey, Jesús; Rodríguez Vázquez, Silvia; Sánchez Ramos, María del Mar;
    Publisher: Ediciones Tragacanto (Granada)
    Countries: Spain, Switzerland, Spain

    Web accessibility has only recently begun to be considered as a key component in the task of the web localiser and, crucially, in the assessment of localisation quality. The ALMA research project (Approaching Localisation by Means of Accessibility) seeks to address this gap by gradually but comprehensively introducing accessibility awareness, issues and perspectives in the principles and procedures of localisation. One of the approaches of ALMA focuses on localiser education and aims at both integrating web accessibility as content to be transferred in the process of localisation and as a methodological way of rethinking website analysis and interlingual, intercultural, intersemiotic transformation. This would allow localisation students to observe the interrelation between the different semiotic, temporal, spatial or ergodic elements coded in the product, with the aim of being perceived, understood and operated by users through different modalities, senses, capacities and technologies. In this chapter, the specific example of culture and heritage websites is used to illustrate how the social and technological dimensions of multimodal translation, localisation and accessibility converge. By exploring the interrelation of web accessibility, localiser education, Universal Design for Learning, and culture and heritage websites, we conclude that such combination can provide a critical opportunity to enhance accessibility and learning at various levels: as an outcome of localisation training (more accessible multilingual culture and heritage websites), as a motivational driver for all students to access and be engaged in education, as an accessibility-aware mindset and methodology (better and deeper access to training materials), as well as an excellent interdisciplinary tool.

  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elisa Terumi Rubel Schneider; João Vitor Andrioli de Souza; Julien Knafou; Lucas Emanuel Silva e Oliveira; Jenny Copara; Yohan Bonescki Gumiel; Lucas Ferro Antunes de Oliveira; Emerson Cabrera Paraiso; Douglas Teodoro; Claudia Maria Cabral Moro Barra;
    Publisher: Association for Computational Linguistics
    Country: Switzerland

    With the growing number of electronic health record data, clinical NLP tasks have become increasingly relevant to unlock valuable information from unstructured clinical text. Although the performance of downstream NLP tasks, such as named-entity recognition (NER), in English corpus has recently improved by contextualised language models, less research is available for clinical texts in low resource languages. Our goal is to assess a deep contextual embedding model for Portuguese, so called BioBERTpt, to support clinical and biomedical NER. We transfer learned information encoded in a multilingual-BERT model to a corpora of clinical narratives and biomedical-scientific papers in Brazilian Portuguese. To evaluate the performance of BioBERTpt, we ran NER experiments on two annotated corpora containing clinical narratives and compared the results with existing BERT models. Our in-domain model outperformed the baseline model in F1-score by 2.72%, achieving higher performance in 11 out of 13 assessed entities. We demonstrate that enriching contextual embedding models with domain literature can play an important role in improving performance for specific NLP tasks. The transfer learning process enhanced the Portuguese biomedical NER model by reducing the necessity of labeled data and the demand for retraining a whole new model.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mayor, Anne;
    Publisher: Royal Museum for Central Africa (Tervuren)
    Country: Switzerland

    Ceramic studies in archaeology have long focussed only on the stylistic classication of artefacts, through space and in time, based on morphological and decorative criteria. Few researchers were interested in the technical and functional aspects. It is now accepted that a set of stylistic traits does not necessarily coincide with a certain population. Many studies have demonstrated that technical aspects, on the other hand, are closely correlated to the identity of the producer group, as they often result from an early apprenticeship within the ethno-linguistic group. The transmission of technical knowledge can also follow other social configurations, such as clan, socio-professional class, or gender. Technical elements therefore provide essential information, even if they seem difficult to access. Furthermore, all pottery is produced in a particular context and is made to be used. The artisan will therefore make technical choices that take into account environmental and cultural constraints, as well as intended use. Studying the technical variability of ceramic assemblages thus aims at understanding the artisans' technical choices and their meanings. The technological analysis of archaeological ceramics involves a reconstruction of the different manufacturing steps following a chaîne opératoire framework. The main stages are clay processing, shaping, nishing, and ring. In archaeology, the interpretation of ceramics usually refers to – explicitly or not – a series of knowledge built by different approaches. Ethnoarchaeology provides explicit references that are useful for interpreting the past by studying systematically, in the present, the links between ceramics and their various meanings, as well as the mechanisms behind observed regularities. technological analyses therefore often rely on ethnoarchaeology, and other approaches such as experimental archaeology or archaeometry. These methods are varied and borrow elements from cultural anthropology as well as analytical tools from the natural sciences.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dominique Jaillard; Christophe Nihan;
    Publisher: Harrassowitz (Wiesbaden)
    Country: Switzerland
  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Simon Senecal; Niels A. Nijdam; Nadia Magnenat Thalmann;
    Country: Switzerland

    Learning couple dance such as Salsa is a challenge for the modern human as it requires to assimilate and understand correctly all the dance parameters. Traditionally learned with a teacher, some situation and the variability of dance class environment can impact the learning process. Having a better understanding of what is a good salsa dancer from motion analysis perspective would bring interesting knowledge and can complement better learning. In this paper, we propose a set of music and interaction based motion features to classify salsa dancer couple performance in three learning states (beginner, intermediate and expert). These motion features are an interpretation of components given via interviews from teacher and professionals and other dance features found in systematic review of papers. For the presented study, a motion capture database (SALSA) has been recorded of 26 different couples with three skill levels dancing on 10 different tempos (260 clips). Each recorded clips con tains a basic steps sequence and an extended improvisation sequence during two minutes in total at 120 frame per second. Each of the 27 motion features have been computed on a sliding window that corresponds to the 8 beats reference for dance. Different multiclass classifier has been tested, mainly k-nearest neighbours, Random forest and Support Vector Machine, with an accuracy result of classification up to 81% for three levels and 92% for two levels. A later feature analysis validates 23 out of 27 proposed features. The work presented here has profound implications for future studies of motion analysis, couple dance learning and human-human interaction.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Rijen, Paul; Teodoro, Douglas; Naderi, Nona; Mottin, Luc; Knafou, Julien David Marc; Ruch, Patrick;
    Country: Switzerland

    In response to the CLEF eRisk 2019 shared task on measuring the severity of the signs of depression from threads of user submissions on social media, our team has developed a data-driven, ensemble model approach. Our system leverages word polarities, token extraction via mutual information, keyword expansion and semantic similarities for classifying Reddit posts according to the Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI). Individual models were combined at the post level by majority voting. The approach achieved a baseline performance for the assessed metrics, including Average Hit Rate and Depression Category Hit Rate, being equivalent to the median system in the limit of one standard deviation.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Deotto, Francesco;
    Publisher: La Nuova Mezzina Arte (Molfetta)
    Country: Switzerland
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Joy McCorriston; Michael J. Harrower; Tara Steimer-Herbet; Kimberly D. Williams; Jennifer Everhart;
    Publisher: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press (Los Angeles)
    Country: Switzerland
  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudia Baur; Andrew Caines; Cathy Chua; Johanna Gerlach; Mengjie Qian; Manny Rayner; Martin J. Russell; Helmer Strik; Xizi Wei;
    Countries: Netherlands, Switzerland

    We present an overview of the second edition of the Spoken CALL Shared Task. Groups competed on a prompt-response task using English-language data collected, through an online CALL game, from Swiss German teens in their second and third years of learning English. Each item consists of a written German prompt and an audio file containing a spoken response. The task is to accept linguistically correct responses and reject linguistically incorrect ones, with "linguistically correct" defined by a gold standard derived from human annotations. Scoring was performed using a metric defined as the ratio of the relative rejection rates on incorrect and correct responses. The second edition received eighteen entries and showed very substantial improvement on the first edition; all entries were better than the best entry from the first edition, and the best score was about four times higher. We present the task, the resources, the results, a discussion of the metrics used, and an analysis of what makes items challenging. In particular, we present quantitative evidence suggesting that incorrect responses are much more difficult to process than correct responses, and that the most significant factor in making a response challenging is its distance from the closest training example.

search
Include:
26 Research products, page 1 of 3
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arena, Francesca;
    Publisher: Le Mans Université
    Country: Switzerland

    Almost entirely overlooked throughout the 20th century, neglected by contemporary medical manuals, the clitoris has gradually returned centre stage thanks to Western feminism.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Torres del Rey, Jesús; Rodríguez Vázquez, Silvia; Sánchez Ramos, María del Mar;
    Publisher: Ediciones Tragacanto (Granada)
    Countries: Spain, Switzerland, Spain

    Web accessibility has only recently begun to be considered as a key component in the task of the web localiser and, crucially, in the assessment of localisation quality. The ALMA research project (Approaching Localisation by Means of Accessibility) seeks to address this gap by gradually but comprehensively introducing accessibility awareness, issues and perspectives in the principles and procedures of localisation. One of the approaches of ALMA focuses on localiser education and aims at both integrating web accessibility as content to be transferred in the process of localisation and as a methodological way of rethinking website analysis and interlingual, intercultural, intersemiotic transformation. This would allow localisation students to observe the interrelation between the different semiotic, temporal, spatial or ergodic elements coded in the product, with the aim of being perceived, understood and operated by users through different modalities, senses, capacities and technologies. In this chapter, the specific example of culture and heritage websites is used to illustrate how the social and technological dimensions of multimodal translation, localisation and accessibility converge. By exploring the interrelation of web accessibility, localiser education, Universal Design for Learning, and culture and heritage websites, we conclude that such combination can provide a critical opportunity to enhance accessibility and learning at various levels: as an outcome of localisation training (more accessible multilingual culture and heritage websites), as a motivational driver for all students to access and be engaged in education, as an accessibility-aware mindset and methodology (better and deeper access to training materials), as well as an excellent interdisciplinary tool.

  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elisa Terumi Rubel Schneider; João Vitor Andrioli de Souza; Julien Knafou; Lucas Emanuel Silva e Oliveira; Jenny Copara; Yohan Bonescki Gumiel; Lucas Ferro Antunes de Oliveira; Emerson Cabrera Paraiso; Douglas Teodoro; Claudia Maria Cabral Moro Barra;
    Publisher: Association for Computational Linguistics
    Country: Switzerland

    With the growing number of electronic health record data, clinical NLP tasks have become increasingly relevant to unlock valuable information from unstructured clinical text. Although the performance of downstream NLP tasks, such as named-entity recognition (NER), in English corpus has recently improved by contextualised language models, less research is available for clinical texts in low resource languages. Our goal is to assess a deep contextual embedding model for Portuguese, so called BioBERTpt, to support clinical and biomedical NER. We transfer learned information encoded in a multilingual-BERT model to a corpora of clinical narratives and biomedical-scientific papers in Brazilian Portuguese. To evaluate the performance of BioBERTpt, we ran NER experiments on two annotated corpora containing clinical narratives and compared the results with existing BERT models. Our in-domain model outperformed the baseline model in F1-score by 2.72%, achieving higher performance in 11 out of 13 assessed entities. We demonstrate that enriching contextual embedding models with domain literature can play an important role in improving performance for specific NLP tasks. The transfer learning process enhanced the Portuguese biomedical NER model by reducing the necessity of labeled data and the demand for retraining a whole new model.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mayor, Anne;
    Publisher: Royal Museum for Central Africa (Tervuren)
    Country: Switzerland

    Ceramic studies in archaeology have long focussed only on the stylistic classication of artefacts, through space and in time, based on morphological and decorative criteria. Few researchers were interested in the technical and functional aspects. It is now accepted that a set of stylistic traits does not necessarily coincide with a certain population. Many studies have demonstrated that technical aspects, on the other hand, are closely correlated to the identity of the producer group, as they often result from an early apprenticeship within the ethno-linguistic group. The transmission of technical knowledge can also follow other social configurations, such as clan, socio-professional class, or gender. Technical elements therefore provide essential information, even if they seem difficult to access. Furthermore, all pottery is produced in a particular context and is made to be used. The artisan will therefore make technical choices that take into account environmental and cultural constraints, as well as intended use. Studying the technical variability of ceramic assemblages thus aims at understanding the artisans' technical choices and their meanings. The technological analysis of archaeological ceramics involves a reconstruction of the different manufacturing steps following a chaîne opératoire framework. The main stages are clay processing, shaping, nishing, and ring. In archaeology, the interpretation of ceramics usually refers to – explicitly or not – a series of knowledge built by different approaches. Ethnoarchaeology provides explicit references that are useful for interpreting the past by studying systematically, in the present, the links between ceramics and their various meanings, as well as the mechanisms behind observed regularities. technological analyses therefore often rely on ethnoarchaeology, and other approaches such as experimental archaeology or archaeometry. These methods are varied and borrow elements from cultural anthropology as well as analytical tools from the natural sciences.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dominique Jaillard; Christophe Nihan;
    Publisher: Harrassowitz (Wiesbaden)
    Country: Switzerland
  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Simon Senecal; Niels A. Nijdam; Nadia Magnenat Thalmann;
    Country: Switzerland

    Learning couple dance such as Salsa is a challenge for the modern human as it requires to assimilate and understand correctly all the dance parameters. Traditionally learned with a teacher, some situation and the variability of dance class environment can impact the learning process. Having a better understanding of what is a good salsa dancer from motion analysis perspective would bring interesting knowledge and can complement better learning. In this paper, we propose a set of music and interaction based motion features to classify salsa dancer couple performance in three learning states (beginner, intermediate and expert). These motion features are an interpretation of components given via interviews from teacher and professionals and other dance features found in systematic review of papers. For the presented study, a motion capture database (SALSA) has been recorded of 26 different couples with three skill levels dancing on 10 different tempos (260 clips). Each recorded clips con tains a basic steps sequence and an extended improvisation sequence during two minutes in total at 120 frame per second. Each of the 27 motion features have been computed on a sliding window that corresponds to the 8 beats reference for dance. Different multiclass classifier has been tested, mainly k-nearest neighbours, Random forest and Support Vector Machine, with an accuracy result of classification up to 81% for three levels and 92% for two levels. A later feature analysis validates 23 out of 27 proposed features. The work presented here has profound implications for future studies of motion analysis, couple dance learning and human-human interaction.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    van Rijen, Paul; Teodoro, Douglas; Naderi, Nona; Mottin, Luc; Knafou, Julien David Marc; Ruch, Patrick;
    Country: Switzerland

    In response to the CLEF eRisk 2019 shared task on measuring the severity of the signs of depression from threads of user submissions on social media, our team has developed a data-driven, ensemble model approach. Our system leverages word polarities, token extraction via mutual information, keyword expansion and semantic similarities for classifying Reddit posts according to the Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI). Individual models were combined at the post level by majority voting. The approach achieved a baseline performance for the assessed metrics, including Average Hit Rate and Depression Category Hit Rate, being equivalent to the median system in the limit of one standard deviation.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Deotto, Francesco;
    Publisher: La Nuova Mezzina Arte (Molfetta)
    Country: Switzerland
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Joy McCorriston; Michael J. Harrower; Tara Steimer-Herbet; Kimberly D. Williams; Jennifer Everhart;
    Publisher: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology Press (Los Angeles)
    Country: Switzerland
  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudia Baur; Andrew Caines; Cathy Chua; Johanna Gerlach; Mengjie Qian; Manny Rayner; Martin J. Russell; Helmer Strik; Xizi Wei;
    Countries: Netherlands, Switzerland

    We present an overview of the second edition of the Spoken CALL Shared Task. Groups competed on a prompt-response task using English-language data collected, through an online CALL game, from Swiss German teens in their second and third years of learning English. Each item consists of a written German prompt and an audio file containing a spoken response. The task is to accept linguistically correct responses and reject linguistically incorrect ones, with "linguistically correct" defined by a gold standard derived from human annotations. Scoring was performed using a metric defined as the ratio of the relative rejection rates on incorrect and correct responses. The second edition received eighteen entries and showed very substantial improvement on the first edition; all entries were better than the best entry from the first edition, and the best score was about four times higher. We present the task, the resources, the results, a discussion of the metrics used, and an analysis of what makes items challenging. In particular, we present quantitative evidence suggesting that incorrect responses are much more difficult to process than correct responses, and that the most significant factor in making a response challenging is its distance from the closest training example.

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