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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karlheinz Mörth; Laurent Romary; Gerhard Budin; Daniel Schopper;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: FWF | Arabic in the Middle Atla... (P 21722)

    International audience; Academic dictionary writing is making greater and greater use of the TEI Guidelines’ dictionary module. And as increasing numbers of TEI dictionaries become available, there is an ever more palpable need to work towards greater interoperability among dictionary writing systems and other language resources that are needed by dictionaries and dictionary tools. In particular this holds true for the crucial role that statistical data obtained from language resources play in lexicographic workflow—a role that also has to be reflected in the model of the data produced in these workflows. Presenting a range of current projects, the authors address two main questions in this area: How can the relationship between a dictionary and other language resources be conceptualized, irrespective of whether they are used in the production of the dictionary or to enrich existing lexicographic data? And how can this be documented using the TEI Guidelines? Discussing a variety of options, this paper proposes a customization of the TEI dictionary module that tries to respond to the emerging requirements in an environment of increasingly intertwined language resources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Partzsch, Henriette;
    Publisher: Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia
    Country: United Kingdom

    ‘Salvage’ evokes complex dynamics of loss, recovery and value, in such contexts\ud as waste management or shipwreck and maritime law. Similar dynamics, often\ud triggered by a collective or individual experience of a void or an absence, motivate\ud and inform much research into the history of women’s writing. The present article\ud explores, from the point of view of literary studies, the effects of understanding\ud research into the history of women’s writing as a salvage operation. This metaphor\ud bestows on the material studied the ambiguous status of remains. While\ud hindering the full integration of women’ s writing in more traditional accounts of\ud the literary past, the understanding of surviving material as remains can become\ud the starting point for constructing new, inclusive approaches to literary history.\ud This reframing of the problem is possible thanks to recent developments in the\ud Humanities, with an increasing interest in models and theories that allow us\ud to better understand complex and dynamic phenomena. In order to illustrate\ud the possibilities of this approach, the article draws on a brief analysis of nineteenth-century Spanish fashion magazines.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Magdalena Matysek; Stephanie Evers; Marshall K. Samuel; Sofie Sjögersten;
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Country: United Kingdom

    AbstractTropical peatlands are currently being rapidly cleared and drained for the establishment of oil palm plantations, which threatens their globally significant carbon sequestration capacity. Large-scale land conversion of tropical peatlands is important in the context of greenhouse gas emission factors and sustainable land management. At present, quantification of carbon dioxide losses from tropical peatlands is limited by our understanding of the relative contribution of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration to net peat surface CO2 emissions. In this study we separated heterotrophic and autotrophic components of peat CO2 losses from two oil palm plantations (one established in ‘2000’ and the other in 1978, then replanted in ‘2006’) using chamber-based emissions sampling along a transect from the rooting to non-rooting zones on a peatland in Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia over the course of 3 months (June–August, 2014). Collar CO2 measurements were compared with soil temperature and moisture at site and also accompanied by depth profiles assessing peat C and bulk density. The soil respiration decreased exponentially with distance from the palm trunks with the sharpest decline found for the plantation with the younger palms with overall fluxes of 1341 and 988 mg CO2 m−2 h−1, respectively, at the 2000 and 2006 plantations, respectively. The mean heterotrophic flux was 909 ± SE 136 and 716 ± SE 201 mg m−2 h−1 at the 2000 and 2006 plantations, respectively. Autotrophic emissions adjacent to the palm trunks were 845 ± SE 135 and 1558 ± SE 341 mg m−2 h−1 at the 2000 and 2006 plantations, respectively. Heterotrophic CO2 flux was positively related to peat soil moisture, but not temperature. Total peat C stocks were 60 kg m−2 (down to 1 m depth) and did not vary among plantations of different ages but SOC concentrations declined significantly with depth at both plantations but the decline was sharper in the second generation 2006 plantation. The CO2 flux values reported in this study suggest a potential for very high carbon (C) loss from drained tropical peats during the dry season. This is particularly concerning given that more intense dry periods related to climate change are predicted for SE Asia. Taken together, this study highlights the need for careful management of tropical peatlands, and the vulnerability of their carbon storage capability under conditions of drainage.

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2017 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Collaboration, INDIGO-DataCloud; Salomoni, Davide; Campos, Isabel; Gaido, Luciano; de Lucas, Jesus Marco; Solagna, Peter; Gomes, Jorge; Matyska, Ludek; Fuhrman, Patrick; Hardt, Marcus; +54 more
    Publisher: arXiv
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549)

    This paper describes the achievements of the H2020 project INDIGO-DataCloud. The project has provided e-infrastructures with tools, applications and cloud framework enhancements to manage the demanding requirements of scientific communities, either locally or through enhanced interfaces. The middleware developed allows to federate hybrid resources, to easily write, port and run scientific applications to the cloud. In particular, we have extended existing PaaS (Platform as a Service) solutions, allowing public and private e-infrastructures, including those provided by EGI, EUDAT, and Helix Nebula, to integrate their existing services and make them available through AAI services compliant with GEANT interfederation policies, thus guaranteeing transparency and trust in the provisioning of such services. Our middleware facilitates the execution of applications using containers on Cloud and Grid based infrastructures, as well as on HPC clusters. Our developments are freely downloadable as open source components, and are already being integrated into many scientific applications. Comment: 39 pages, 15 figures.Version accepted in Journal of Grid Computing

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2020 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zamani, Maryam; Tejedor, Alejandro; Vogl, Malte; Krautli, Florian; Valleriani, Matteo; Kantz, Holger;
    Publisher: arXiv

    We investigated the evolution and transformation of scientific knowledge in the early modern period, analyzing more than 350 different editions of textbooks used for teaching astronomy in European universities from the late fifteenth century to mid-seventeenth century. These historical sources constitute the Sphaera Corpus. By examining different semantic relations among individual parts of each edition on record, we built a multiplex network consisting of six layers, as well as the aggregated network built from the superposition of all the layers. The network analysis reveals the emergence of five different communities. The contribution of each layer in shaping the communities and the properties of each community are studied. The most influential books in the corpus are found by calculating the average age of all the out-going and in-coming links for each book. A small group of editions is identified as a transmitter of knowledge as they bridge past knowledge to the future through a long temporal interval. Our analysis, moreover, identifies the most disruptive books. These books introduce new knowledge that is then adopted by almost all the books published afterwards until the end of the whole period of study. The historical research on the content of the identified books, as an empirical test, finally corroborates the results of all our analyses. Comment: 19 pages, 9 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bridgette Wessels; Rachel Finn; Peter Linde; Paolo Mazzetti; Stefano Nativi; Susan Riley; Rod Smallwood; Mark J. Taylor; Victoria Tsoukala; Kush Wadhwa; +1 more
    Countries: Italy, Sweden, Netherlands
    Project: EC | APARSEN (269977), EC | RECODE (321463), EC | OPENAIRE (246686), EC | ETTIS (285593), EC | DRIVER II (212147)

    This paper explores key issues in the development of open access to research data. The use of digital means for developing, storing and manipulating data is creating a focus on ‘data-driven science’. One aspect of this focus is the development of ‘open access’ to research data. Open access to research data refers to the way in which various types of data are openly available to public and private stakeholders, user communities and citizens. Open access to research data, however, involves more than simply providing easier and wider access to data for potential user groups. The development of open access requires attention to the ways data are considered in different areas of research. We identify how open access is being unevenly developed across the research environment and the consequences this has in terms of generating data gaps. Data gaps refer to the way data becomes detached from published conclusions. To address these issues, we examine four main areas in developing open access to research data: stakeholder roles and values; technological requirements for managing and sharing data; legal and ethical regulations and procedures; institutional roles and policy frameworks. We conclude that problems of variability and consistency across the open access ecosystem need to be addressed within and between these areas to ensure that risks surrounding a data gap are managed in open access. 11 authors. Missing: Sally Wyatt

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gerald Hiebel; Klaus Hanke;

    Abstract. The ancient mining landscape of Schwaz/Brixlegg in the Tyrol, Austria witnessed mining from prehistoric times to modern times creating a first order cultural landscape when it comes to one of the most important inventions in human history: the production of metal. In 1991 a part of this landscape was lost due to an enormous landslide that reshaped part of the mountain. With our work we want to propose a digital workflow to create a 3D semantic representation of this ancient mining landscape with its mining structures to preserve it for posterity. First, we define a conceptual model to integrate the data. It is based on the CIDOC CRM ontology and CRMgeo for geometric data. To transform our information sources to a formal representation of the classes and properties of the ontology we applied semantic web technologies and created a knowledge graph in RDF (Resource Description Framework). Through the CRMgeo extension coordinate information of mining features can be integrated into the RDF graph and thus related to the detailed digital elevation model that may be visualized together with the mining structures using Geoinformation systems or 3D visualization tools. The RDF network of the triple store can be queried using the SPARQL query language. We created a snapshot of mining, settlement and burial sites in the Bronze Age. The results of the query were loaded into a Geoinformation system and a visualization of known bronze age sites related to mining, settlement and burial activities was created.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Terras, Melissa; Baker, James; Hetherington, James; Beavan, David; Welsh, Anne; O'Neill, Helen; Finley, Will; Duke-Williams, Oliver; Farquhar, Adam;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    Although there has been a drive in the cultural heritage sector to provide large-scale, open data sets for researchers, we have not seen a commensurate rise in humanities researchers undertaking complex analysis of these data sets for their own research purposes. This article reports on a pilot project at University College London, working in collaboration with the British Library, to scope out how best high-performance computing facilities can be used to facilitate the needs of researchers in the humanities. Using institutional data-processing frameworks routinely used to support scientific research, we assisted four humanities researchers in analysing 60,000 digitized books, and we present two resulting case studies here. This research allowed us to identify infrastructural and procedural barriers and make recommendations on resource allocation to best support non-computational researchers in undertaking ‘big data’ research. We recommend that research software engineer capacity can be most efficiently deployed in maintaining and supporting data sets, while librarians can provide an essential service in running initial, routine queries for humanities scholars. At present there are too many technical hurdles for most individuals in the humanities to consider analysing at scale these increasingly available open data sets, and by building on existing frameworks of support from research computing and library services, we can best support humanities scholars in developing methods and approaches to take advantage of these research opportunities.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jack Bowers; Laurent Romary;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    In this paper we provide a systematic and comprehensive set of modeling principles for representing etymological data in digital dictionaries using TEI. The purpose is to integrate in one coherent framework both digital representations of legacy dictionaries and born-digital lexical databases that are constructed manually or semi-automatically. We provide examples from many different types of etymological phenomena from traditional lexicographic practice, as well as analytical approaches from functional and cognitive linguistics such as metaphor, metonymy, and grammaticalization, which in many lexicographical and formal linguistic circles have not often been treated as truly etymological in nature, and have thus been largely left out of etymological dictionaries. In order to fully and accurately express the phenomena and their structures, we have made several proposals for expanding and amending some aspects of the existing TEI framework. Finally, with reference to both synchronic and diachronic data, we also demonstrate how encoders may integrate semantic web/linked open data information resources into TEI dictionaries as a basis for the sense, and/or the semantic domain, of an entry and/or an etymon.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Birgit Schmidt; Astrid Orth; Gwen Franck; Iryna Kuchma; Petr Knoth; Jose Carvalho;
    Countries: Portugal, Germany
    Project: EC | FOSTER (612425)

    Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project. The FOSTER project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of all project partners to the design and implementation of the FOSTER project.

search
Include:
20 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karlheinz Mörth; Laurent Romary; Gerhard Budin; Daniel Schopper;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: FWF | Arabic in the Middle Atla... (P 21722)

    International audience; Academic dictionary writing is making greater and greater use of the TEI Guidelines’ dictionary module. And as increasing numbers of TEI dictionaries become available, there is an ever more palpable need to work towards greater interoperability among dictionary writing systems and other language resources that are needed by dictionaries and dictionary tools. In particular this holds true for the crucial role that statistical data obtained from language resources play in lexicographic workflow—a role that also has to be reflected in the model of the data produced in these workflows. Presenting a range of current projects, the authors address two main questions in this area: How can the relationship between a dictionary and other language resources be conceptualized, irrespective of whether they are used in the production of the dictionary or to enrich existing lexicographic data? And how can this be documented using the TEI Guidelines? Discussing a variety of options, this paper proposes a customization of the TEI dictionary module that tries to respond to the emerging requirements in an environment of increasingly intertwined language resources.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Partzsch, Henriette;
    Publisher: Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia
    Country: United Kingdom

    ‘Salvage’ evokes complex dynamics of loss, recovery and value, in such contexts\ud as waste management or shipwreck and maritime law. Similar dynamics, often\ud triggered by a collective or individual experience of a void or an absence, motivate\ud and inform much research into the history of women’s writing. The present article\ud explores, from the point of view of literary studies, the effects of understanding\ud research into the history of women’s writing as a salvage operation. This metaphor\ud bestows on the material studied the ambiguous status of remains. While\ud hindering the full integration of women’ s writing in more traditional accounts of\ud the literary past, the understanding of surviving material as remains can become\ud the starting point for constructing new, inclusive approaches to literary history.\ud This reframing of the problem is possible thanks to recent developments in the\ud Humanities, with an increasing interest in models and theories that allow us\ud to better understand complex and dynamic phenomena. In order to illustrate\ud the possibilities of this approach, the article draws on a brief analysis of nineteenth-century Spanish fashion magazines.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Magdalena Matysek; Stephanie Evers; Marshall K. Samuel; Sofie Sjögersten;
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Country: United Kingdom

    AbstractTropical peatlands are currently being rapidly cleared and drained for the establishment of oil palm plantations, which threatens their globally significant carbon sequestration capacity. Large-scale land conversion of tropical peatlands is important in the context of greenhouse gas emission factors and sustainable land management. At present, quantification of carbon dioxide losses from tropical peatlands is limited by our understanding of the relative contribution of heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration to net peat surface CO2 emissions. In this study we separated heterotrophic and autotrophic components of peat CO2 losses from two oil palm plantations (one established in ‘2000’ and the other in 1978, then replanted in ‘2006’) using chamber-based emissions sampling along a transect from the rooting to non-rooting zones on a peatland in Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia over the course of 3 months (June–August, 2014). Collar CO2 measurements were compared with soil temperature and moisture at site and also accompanied by depth profiles assessing peat C and bulk density. The soil respiration decreased exponentially with distance from the palm trunks with the sharpest decline found for the plantation with the younger palms with overall fluxes of 1341 and 988 mg CO2 m−2 h−1, respectively, at the 2000 and 2006 plantations, respectively. The mean heterotrophic flux was 909 ± SE 136 and 716 ± SE 201 mg m−2 h−1 at the 2000 and 2006 plantations, respectively. Autotrophic emissions adjacent to the palm trunks were 845 ± SE 135 and 1558 ± SE 341 mg m−2 h−1 at the 2000 and 2006 plantations, respectively. Heterotrophic CO2 flux was positively related to peat soil moisture, but not temperature. Total peat C stocks were 60 kg m−2 (down to 1 m depth) and did not vary among plantations of different ages but SOC concentrations declined significantly with depth at both plantations but the decline was sharper in the second generation 2006 plantation. The CO2 flux values reported in this study suggest a potential for very high carbon (C) loss from drained tropical peats during the dry season. This is particularly concerning given that more intense dry periods related to climate change are predicted for SE Asia. Taken together, this study highlights the need for careful management of tropical peatlands, and the vulnerability of their carbon storage capability under conditions of drainage.

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2017 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Collaboration, INDIGO-DataCloud; Salomoni, Davide; Campos, Isabel; Gaido, Luciano; de Lucas, Jesus Marco; Solagna, Peter; Gomes, Jorge; Matyska, Ludek; Fuhrman, Patrick; Hardt, Marcus; +54 more
    Publisher: arXiv
    Project: EC | INDIGO-DataCloud (653549)

    This paper describes the achievements of the H2020 project INDIGO-DataCloud. The project has provided e-infrastructures with tools, applications and cloud framework enhancements to manage the demanding requirements of scientific communities, either locally or through enhanced interfaces. The middleware developed allows to federate hybrid resources, to easily write, port and run scientific applications to the cloud. In particular, we have extended existing PaaS (Platform as a Service) solutions, allowing public and private e-infrastructures, including those provided by EGI, EUDAT, and Helix Nebula, to integrate their existing services and make them available through AAI services compliant with GEANT interfederation policies, thus guaranteeing transparency and trust in the provisioning of such services. Our middleware facilitates the execution of applications using containers on Cloud and Grid based infrastructures, as well as on HPC clusters. Our developments are freely downloadable as open source components, and are already being integrated into many scientific applications. Comment: 39 pages, 15 figures.Version accepted in Journal of Grid Computing

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2020 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Zamani, Maryam; Tejedor, Alejandro; Vogl, Malte; Krautli, Florian; Valleriani, Matteo; Kantz, Holger;
    Publisher: arXiv

    We investigated the evolution and transformation of scientific knowledge in the early modern period, analyzing more than 350 different editions of textbooks used for teaching astronomy in European universities from the late fifteenth century to mid-seventeenth century. These historical sources constitute the Sphaera Corpus. By examining different semantic relations among individual parts of each edition on record, we built a multiplex network consisting of six layers, as well as the aggregated network built from the superposition of all the layers. The network analysis reveals the emergence of five different communities. The contribution of each layer in shaping the communities and the properties of each community are studied. The most influential books in the corpus are found by calculating the average age of all the out-going and in-coming links for each book. A small group of editions is identified as a transmitter of knowledge as they bridge past knowledge to the future through a long temporal interval. Our analysis, moreover, identifies the most disruptive books. These books introduce new knowledge that is then adopted by almost all the books published afterwards until the end of the whole period of study. The historical research on the content of the identified books, as an empirical test, finally corroborates the results of all our analyses. Comment: 19 pages, 9 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bridgette Wessels; Rachel Finn; Peter Linde; Paolo Mazzetti; Stefano Nativi; Susan Riley; Rod Smallwood; Mark J. Taylor; Victoria Tsoukala; Kush Wadhwa; +1 more
    Countries: Italy, Sweden, Netherlands
    Project: EC | APARSEN (269977), EC | RECODE (321463), EC | OPENAIRE (246686), EC | ETTIS (285593), EC | DRIVER II (212147)

    This paper explores key issues in the development of open access to research data. The use of digital means for developing, storing and manipulating data is creating a focus on ‘data-driven science’. One aspect of this focus is the development of ‘open access’ to research data. Open access to research data refers to the way in which various types of data are openly available to public and private stakeholders, user communities and citizens. Open access to research data, however, involves more than simply providing easier and wider access to data for potential user groups. The development of open access requires attention to the ways data are considered in different areas of research. We identify how open access is being unevenly developed across the research environment and the consequences this has in terms of generating data gaps. Data gaps refer to the way data becomes detached from published conclusions. To address these issues, we examine four main areas in developing open access to research data: stakeholder roles and values; technological requirements for managing and sharing data; legal and ethical regulations and procedures; institutional roles and policy frameworks. We conclude that problems of variability and consistency across the open access ecosystem need to be addressed within and between these areas to ensure that risks surrounding a data gap are managed in open access. 11 authors. Missing: Sally Wyatt

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gerald Hiebel; Klaus Hanke;

    Abstract. The ancient mining landscape of Schwaz/Brixlegg in the Tyrol, Austria witnessed mining from prehistoric times to modern times creating a first order cultural landscape when it comes to one of the most important inventions in human history: the production of metal. In 1991 a part of this landscape was lost due to an enormous landslide that reshaped part of the mountain. With our work we want to propose a digital workflow to create a 3D semantic representation of this ancient mining landscape with its mining structures to preserve it for posterity. First, we define a conceptual model to integrate the data. It is based on the CIDOC CRM ontology and CRMgeo for geometric data. To transform our information sources to a formal representation of the classes and properties of the ontology we applied semantic web technologies and created a knowledge graph in RDF (Resource Description Framework). Through the CRMgeo extension coordinate information of mining features can be integrated into the RDF graph and thus related to the detailed digital elevation model that may be visualized together with the mining structures using Geoinformation systems or 3D visualization tools. The RDF network of the triple store can be queried using the SPARQL query language. We created a snapshot of mining, settlement and burial sites in the Bronze Age. The results of the query were loaded into a Geoinformation system and a visualization of known bronze age sites related to mining, settlement and burial activities was created.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Terras, Melissa; Baker, James; Hetherington, James; Beavan, David; Welsh, Anne; O'Neill, Helen; Finley, Will; Duke-Williams, Oliver; Farquhar, Adam;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    Although there has been a drive in the cultural heritage sector to provide large-scale, open data sets for researchers, we have not seen a commensurate rise in humanities researchers undertaking complex analysis of these data sets for their own research purposes. This article reports on a pilot project at University College London, working in collaboration with the British Library, to scope out how best high-performance computing facilities can be used to facilitate the needs of researchers in the humanities. Using institutional data-processing frameworks routinely used to support scientific research, we assisted four humanities researchers in analysing 60,000 digitized books, and we present two resulting case studies here. This research allowed us to identify infrastructural and procedural barriers and make recommendations on resource allocation to best support non-computational researchers in undertaking ‘big data’ research. We recommend that research software engineer capacity can be most efficiently deployed in maintaining and supporting data sets, while librarians can provide an essential service in running initial, routine queries for humanities scholars. At present there are too many technical hurdles for most individuals in the humanities to consider analysing at scale these increasingly available open data sets, and by building on existing frameworks of support from research computing and library services, we can best support humanities scholars in developing methods and approaches to take advantage of these research opportunities.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jack Bowers; Laurent Romary;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | PARTHENOS (654119)

    In this paper we provide a systematic and comprehensive set of modeling principles for representing etymological data in digital dictionaries using TEI. The purpose is to integrate in one coherent framework both digital representations of legacy dictionaries and born-digital lexical databases that are constructed manually or semi-automatically. We provide examples from many different types of etymological phenomena from traditional lexicographic practice, as well as analytical approaches from functional and cognitive linguistics such as metaphor, metonymy, and grammaticalization, which in many lexicographical and formal linguistic circles have not often been treated as truly etymological in nature, and have thus been largely left out of etymological dictionaries. In order to fully and accurately express the phenomena and their structures, we have made several proposals for expanding and amending some aspects of the existing TEI framework. Finally, with reference to both synchronic and diachronic data, we also demonstrate how encoders may integrate semantic web/linked open data information resources into TEI dictionaries as a basis for the sense, and/or the semantic domain, of an entry and/or an etymon.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Birgit Schmidt; Astrid Orth; Gwen Franck; Iryna Kuchma; Petr Knoth; Jose Carvalho;
    Countries: Portugal, Germany
    Project: EC | FOSTER (612425)

    Open science refers to all things open in research and scholarly communication: from publications and research data to code, models and methods as well as quality evaluation based on open peer review. However, getting started with implementing open science might not be as straightforward for all stakeholders. For example, what do research funders expect in terms of open access to publications and/or research data? Where and how to publish research data? How to ensure that research results are reproducible? These are all legitimate questions and, in particular, early career researchers may benefit from additional guidance and training. In this paper we review the activities of the European-funded FOSTER project which organized and supported a wide range of targeted trainings for open science, based on face-to-face events and on a growing suite of e-learning courses. This article reviews the approach and experiences gained from the first two years of the project. The FOSTER project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 612425. The authors gratefully acknowledge the contributions of all project partners to the design and implementation of the FOSTER project.

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