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  • 2012-2021
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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bernd Carsten Stahl;
    Publisher: IGI Global
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper concentrate on a proactive engagement with emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs) with the goal of an early identification of the ethical issues these technologies are likely to raise. After an overview of the emerging ICTs for the next future (leveraging the results of the EU funded project ETICA), the paper identify the possible ethical consequences. Then the emerging ICTs are evaluated from different perspectives for prioritizing technical and policy intervention on them. The question of governance is then addressed with a final collection of recommendations for policy makers, industry, researchers and civil society.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holma, Katariina; Huhtala, Hanna-Maija;
    Publisher: Philosophy of Education Society
    Country: Finland

    Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Conference object . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marta E. Cecchinato; Anna L. Cox; Jon Bird;
    Publisher: ACM
    Country: United Kingdom

    Wearable computers are expected to become the next big thing but popular press is divided on whether they will be successful. In this paper we review the existing literature on one type of wearable -- smartwatches -- and extend their definition, in addition to highlighting the need to understand users' everyday appropriation of these technologies. We present initial findings from an on going interview study with ten early adopters that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to investigate why and how people use smartwatches in real life. We describe everyday use of smartwatches, highlight the added value seen by users, and identify the limitations to mass adoption as expressed by current users.

  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yu Hao; Zhijie Xu; Jing Wang; Ying Liu; Jiulun Fan;
    Publisher: IEEE
    Country: United Kingdom

    With the purpose of automatic detection of crowd patterns including abrupt and abnormal changes, a novel approach for extracting motion “textures” from dynamic Spatio-Temporal Volume (STV) blocks formulated by live video streams has been proposed. This paper starts from introducing the common approach for STV construction and corresponding Spatio-Temporal Texture (STT) extraction techniques. Next the crowd motion information contained within the random STT slices are evaluated based on the information entropy theory to cull the static background and noises occupying most of the STV spaces. A preprocessing step using Gabor filtering for improving the STT sampling efficiency and motion fidelity has been devised and tested. The technique has been applied on benchmarking video databases for proof-of-concept and performance evaluation. Preliminary results have shown encouraging outcomes and promising potentials for its real-world crowd monitoring and control applications.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tatyana Humle; Catherine M. Hill;
    Country: United Kingdom

    In this chapter, patterns of interactions are reviewed, from benign to mutually harmful, that characterize people–primate relationships, and the main social and ecological factors shaping people–primate coexistence are summarized. The reasons why certain primate species are better able to share landscapes with their human neighbours are examined, along with factors that influence people’s perceptions of, and attitudes, towards them. The chapter stresses how, at a local level, variations in socio-economic and cultural norms and values often underlie negative interactions between humans and primates. Lessons learned from studies to reduce negative interactions between people and primates are discussed, and broader scale landscape approaches that could facilitate effective primate conservation and human livelihood objectives examined. Finally, it is emphasized that understanding people–primate interactions requires a multifaceted approach, combining detailed understanding of the context, and needs of the different stakeholders, human and animal, and drivers of changing patterns of coexistence.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jiwon Shin; Rudolph Triebel; Roland Siegwart;
    Publisher: Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Autonomous System Lab
    Country: Switzerland

    We present a method for mobile robots to learn the concept of objects and categorize them without supervision using 3D point clouds from a laser scanner as input. In particular, we address the challenges of categorizing objects discovered in different scans without knowing the number of categories. The underlying object discovery algorithm finds objects per scan and gives them locally-consistent labels. To associate these object labels across all scans, we introduce class graph which encodes the relationship among local object class labels. Our algorithm finds the mapping from local class labels to global category labels by inferring on this graph and uses this mapping to assign the final category label to the discovered objects. We demonstrate on real data our algorithm’s ability to discover and categorize objects without supervision.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2012
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gurch Randhawa;
    Publisher: InTech

    The UK’s Organ Donation Taskforce brought policy and resource focus to tackling transplant-related inequalities. In its first report, they stated, ‘There is an urgent requirement to identify and implement the most effective methods through which organ donation and the “gift of life” can be promoted to the general public, and specifically to the BME (Black and minority ethnic) population. Research should be commissioned through Department of Health Research and Development funding’ (Department of Health 2008a). The Taskforce’s second report stated that ‘The Taskforce strongly recommends that the Programme Delivery Board builds on the foundations of the interviews with faith and belief groups...., to ensure that the valuable dialogue that was established is maintained’ (Department of Health 2008b).

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paul Snelling;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    Codes of ethics and conduct are important documents in health care practice, and must be evaluated alongside an understanding of the role of the organisations which write and publish them. In the UK, established professions like medicine and nursing are subject to statutory regulation and codes which delineate ethical best practice from minimum conduct. However the regulation of psychotherapists in the UK has been the subject of changes in government policy during the last decade, resulting in a fragmented regulatory environment where a number of organisations function both as regular and professional body. There are about 40 codes of ethic and/or conduct in the UK relating to the various professions of psychotherapy. The chapter details the regulatory framework in the UK, and the places of codes within it. The codes’ regulatory role in establishing minimum practice is difficult to assess because so few cases of malpractice are brought, and their role in guiding practice is questioned by using disclosure of confidential information as an example. Psychotherapists are invited to assess whether the codes and associated guidance they operate under are sufficiently detailed to guide practice.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Spence, Peter;
    Publisher: The International Academic Forum (IAFOR)
    Country: United Kingdom

    In this paper I will consider tensions and dialogues between historical enquiry and narrative story-telling, using the case study of my own short historical documentary film The Archive (2018), which I propose to screen during my presentation. \ud \ud Entirely compiled from archive materials including audio testimony, home movie footage of Hong Kong and China in 1952, as well as a de-classified Federal Bureau of Investigation file, the film tells the story of New York lawyer David Drucker who was tracked by the FBI over several decades. These two types of archive may traditionally have been categorised according to their status, respectively, as ‘found’ and ‘official’. (Baron, 2014)\ud \ud As well as outlining theories of the archive I will also consider how this sits within the broader new historicist debate around narrative as a methodology of the historian. I will explore this shared discourse between history and story-telling in the context of The Archive (2018), which narrativizes David Drucker’s story as a historical thriller film. \ud \ud The paper asks the question: can a factual film that mediates the past through a model for genre narrative story-telling also offer new understanding of this period in US history?\ud \ud The outcome of research suggests that the particular editing strategy necessitated by the genre model challenges the traditional orthodoxy of the official government source by giving voice to a previously un-heard FBI suspect. Furthermore it asks us to question the respective ‘value’ of historic documents that have often been categorized according to a hierarchy of ‘official’ and ‘found’.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Juha Holma; Helena Päivinen; Heli Siltala; Salla Kaikkonen;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Finland

    High prevalence of intimate partner violence against women and high levels of gender equality in Finland yield to what has been called the “Nordic paradox.” It has been argued that the high level of gender equality has caused the need for IPV interventions and especially the gendered perspective to be overlooked. However, there has been recent and ongoing development in IPV intervention and prevention in regard to perpetrator programs, couple therapy, and programs to address post-separation stalking. Training programs for social and healthcare professionals and the police have been developed, as well as for teachers and other professionals at school. We hope the current government’s new action plan for combating violence against women will contribute to the development of efficient interventions. peerReviewed

search
Include:
22,826 Research products, page 1 of 2,283
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bernd Carsten Stahl;
    Publisher: IGI Global
    Country: United Kingdom

    This paper concentrate on a proactive engagement with emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs) with the goal of an early identification of the ethical issues these technologies are likely to raise. After an overview of the emerging ICTs for the next future (leveraging the results of the EU funded project ETICA), the paper identify the possible ethical consequences. Then the emerging ICTs are evaluated from different perspectives for prioritizing technical and policy intervention on them. The question of governance is then addressed with a final collection of recommendations for policy makers, industry, researchers and civil society.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holma, Katariina; Huhtala, Hanna-Maija;
    Publisher: Philosophy of Education Society
    Country: Finland

    Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Conference object . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marta E. Cecchinato; Anna L. Cox; Jon Bird;
    Publisher: ACM
    Country: United Kingdom

    Wearable computers are expected to become the next big thing but popular press is divided on whether they will be successful. In this paper we review the existing literature on one type of wearable -- smartwatches -- and extend their definition, in addition to highlighting the need to understand users' everyday appropriation of these technologies. We present initial findings from an on going interview study with ten early adopters that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to investigate why and how people use smartwatches in real life. We describe everyday use of smartwatches, highlight the added value seen by users, and identify the limitations to mass adoption as expressed by current users.

  • Publication . Conference object . Part of book or chapter of book . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yu Hao; Zhijie Xu; Jing Wang; Ying Liu; Jiulun Fan;
    Publisher: IEEE
    Country: United Kingdom

    With the purpose of automatic detection of crowd patterns including abrupt and abnormal changes, a novel approach for extracting motion “textures” from dynamic Spatio-Temporal Volume (STV) blocks formulated by live video streams has been proposed. This paper starts from introducing the common approach for STV construction and corresponding Spatio-Temporal Texture (STT) extraction techniques. Next the crowd motion information contained within the random STT slices are evaluated based on the information entropy theory to cull the static background and noises occupying most of the STV spaces. A preprocessing step using Gabor filtering for improving the STT sampling efficiency and motion fidelity has been devised and tested. The technique has been applied on benchmarking video databases for proof-of-concept and performance evaluation. Preliminary results have shown encouraging outcomes and promising potentials for its real-world crowd monitoring and control applications.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tatyana Humle; Catherine M. Hill;
    Country: United Kingdom

    In this chapter, patterns of interactions are reviewed, from benign to mutually harmful, that characterize people–primate relationships, and the main social and ecological factors shaping people–primate coexistence are summarized. The reasons why certain primate species are better able to share landscapes with their human neighbours are examined, along with factors that influence people’s perceptions of, and attitudes, towards them. The chapter stresses how, at a local level, variations in socio-economic and cultural norms and values often underlie negative interactions between humans and primates. Lessons learned from studies to reduce negative interactions between people and primates are discussed, and broader scale landscape approaches that could facilitate effective primate conservation and human livelihood objectives examined. Finally, it is emphasized that understanding people–primate interactions requires a multifaceted approach, combining detailed understanding of the context, and needs of the different stakeholders, human and animal, and drivers of changing patterns of coexistence.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jiwon Shin; Rudolph Triebel; Roland Siegwart;
    Publisher: Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Autonomous System Lab
    Country: Switzerland

    We present a method for mobile robots to learn the concept of objects and categorize them without supervision using 3D point clouds from a laser scanner as input. In particular, we address the challenges of categorizing objects discovered in different scans without knowing the number of categories. The underlying object discovery algorithm finds objects per scan and gives them locally-consistent labels. To associate these object labels across all scans, we introduce class graph which encodes the relationship among local object class labels. Our algorithm finds the mapping from local class labels to global category labels by inferring on this graph and uses this mapping to assign the final category label to the discovered objects. We demonstrate on real data our algorithm’s ability to discover and categorize objects without supervision.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2012
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gurch Randhawa;
    Publisher: InTech

    The UK’s Organ Donation Taskforce brought policy and resource focus to tackling transplant-related inequalities. In its first report, they stated, ‘There is an urgent requirement to identify and implement the most effective methods through which organ donation and the “gift of life” can be promoted to the general public, and specifically to the BME (Black and minority ethnic) population. Research should be commissioned through Department of Health Research and Development funding’ (Department of Health 2008a). The Taskforce’s second report stated that ‘The Taskforce strongly recommends that the Programme Delivery Board builds on the foundations of the interviews with faith and belief groups...., to ensure that the valuable dialogue that was established is maintained’ (Department of Health 2008b).

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Paul Snelling;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: United Kingdom

    Codes of ethics and conduct are important documents in health care practice, and must be evaluated alongside an understanding of the role of the organisations which write and publish them. In the UK, established professions like medicine and nursing are subject to statutory regulation and codes which delineate ethical best practice from minimum conduct. However the regulation of psychotherapists in the UK has been the subject of changes in government policy during the last decade, resulting in a fragmented regulatory environment where a number of organisations function both as regular and professional body. There are about 40 codes of ethic and/or conduct in the UK relating to the various professions of psychotherapy. The chapter details the regulatory framework in the UK, and the places of codes within it. The codes’ regulatory role in establishing minimum practice is difficult to assess because so few cases of malpractice are brought, and their role in guiding practice is questioned by using disclosure of confidential information as an example. Psychotherapists are invited to assess whether the codes and associated guidance they operate under are sufficiently detailed to guide practice.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Spence, Peter;
    Publisher: The International Academic Forum (IAFOR)
    Country: United Kingdom

    In this paper I will consider tensions and dialogues between historical enquiry and narrative story-telling, using the case study of my own short historical documentary film The Archive (2018), which I propose to screen during my presentation. \ud \ud Entirely compiled from archive materials including audio testimony, home movie footage of Hong Kong and China in 1952, as well as a de-classified Federal Bureau of Investigation file, the film tells the story of New York lawyer David Drucker who was tracked by the FBI over several decades. These two types of archive may traditionally have been categorised according to their status, respectively, as ‘found’ and ‘official’. (Baron, 2014)\ud \ud As well as outlining theories of the archive I will also consider how this sits within the broader new historicist debate around narrative as a methodology of the historian. I will explore this shared discourse between history and story-telling in the context of The Archive (2018), which narrativizes David Drucker’s story as a historical thriller film. \ud \ud The paper asks the question: can a factual film that mediates the past through a model for genre narrative story-telling also offer new understanding of this period in US history?\ud \ud The outcome of research suggests that the particular editing strategy necessitated by the genre model challenges the traditional orthodoxy of the official government source by giving voice to a previously un-heard FBI suspect. Furthermore it asks us to question the respective ‘value’ of historic documents that have often been categorized according to a hierarchy of ‘official’ and ‘found’.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Juha Holma; Helena Päivinen; Heli Siltala; Salla Kaikkonen;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Finland

    High prevalence of intimate partner violence against women and high levels of gender equality in Finland yield to what has been called the “Nordic paradox.” It has been argued that the high level of gender equality has caused the need for IPV interventions and especially the gendered perspective to be overlooked. However, there has been recent and ongoing development in IPV intervention and prevention in regard to perpetrator programs, couple therapy, and programs to address post-separation stalking. Training programs for social and healthcare professionals and the police have been developed, as well as for teachers and other professionals at school. We hope the current government’s new action plan for combating violence against women will contribute to the development of efficient interventions. peerReviewed

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