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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scholtens, Salome; Postma, Dirkje S.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Panasevich, Sviatlana; Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Melen, Erik; Nyberg, Fredrik; Pershagen, Goeran; Jarvis, Deborah; +44 more
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT | A second-generation genom... (084703)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gaspar, Rui; Domingos, Samuel; Diniz, António M.; Falanga, Roberto;
    Publisher: IGI Global
    Country: Portugal
    Project: FCT | UID/PSI/04810/2013 (UID/PSI/04810/2013), WT

    Non-adherence to health recommendations (e.g. medical prescriptions) presents potential costs for healthcare, which could be prevented or mitigated. This is often attributed to a person’s rational choice, to not adhere. However, this may also be determined by individual and contextual factors implied in the recommendations communication process. In accordance, this chapter focuses specifically on barriers to and facilitators of adherence to recommendations and engagement with the healthcare process, particularly concerning the communication between health professionals and patients. For this, the authors present examples of engagement increment through different degrees of participation, from a one-way/directive towards a two-way/engaging communication process. This focuses specifically on a vulnerable population group with increasing healthcare needs: older adults. Future possibilities for two-way engaging communications are discussed, aimed at promoting increased adherence to health recommendations and people’s self-regulation of their own health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Deans, Zandra C.; Costa, Jose Luis; Cree, Ian; Dequeker, Els; Edsjo, Anders; Henderson, Shirley; Hummel, Michael; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Loddo, Marco; Machado, Jose Carlos; +12 more
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT

    The clinical demand for mutation detection within multiple genes from a single tumour sample requires molecular diagnostic laboratories to develop rapid, high-throughput, highly sensitive, accurate and parallel testing within tight budget constraints. To meet this demand, many laboratories employ next-generation sequencing (NGS) based on small amplicons. Building on existing publications and general guidance for the clinical use of NGS and learnings from germline testing, the following guidelines establish consensus standards for somatic diagnostic testing, specifically for identifying and reporting mutations in solid tumours. These guidelines cover the testing strategy, implementation of testing within clinical service, sample requirements, data analysis and reporting of results. In conjunction with appropriate staff training and international standards for laboratory testing, these consensus standards for the use of NGS in molecular pathology of solid tumours will assist laboratories in implementing NGS in clinical services.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dijk, E.M.S.; Dimitropoulos, Harry; Iatropoulou, Katerina; Foufoulas, Ioannis;
    Publisher: OpenAIRE2020
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT , EC | OpenAIRE2020 (643410)

    This deliverable relates to the work carried out under task T8.3, “Research Impact Services”. The task’s focus is on the development of pilots with selected National funding agencies and infrastructure initiatives in order to serve them with the OpenAIRE research impact suite of services. A major service that OpenAIRE provides is the linking of research results to funding. Aside from importing the links from the repositories and journals, OpenAIRE designs, develops and enhances mining algorithms that identify and extract funding information from the text of scientific publications. With the help of NOADs we have initiated bi-lateral, often informal, collaborations with national funding agencies to facilitate mining extraction on their data. This is an on-going activity throughout the duration of the project. Currently the national funding agencies that we are working with are: FCT (Portugal), ARC (Australia), NHMRC (Australia), NSF & NIH (USA), SFI (Ireland), “Ministry of Science Education and Sport” & "Croatian Science Foundation” (Croatia), NWO (Netherlands), and DFG (Germany). This deliverable describes the nature of the data of the identified National funding agencies, as well as their export technologies, and provides the specification of the general-purpose OpenAIRE services required to support research impact measurements.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wathuo, Miriam; Medley, Graham; Nokes, D. James; Munywoki, Patrick K.;
    Publisher: F1000Research
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Household transmission of... (090853), WT | Defining pathways of resp... (102975)

    Background: A better understanding of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemiology requires realistic estimates of RSV shedding patterns, quantities shed, and identification of the related underlying factors.\ud \ud Methods: RSV infection data arise from a cohort study of 47 households with 493 occupants, in coastal Kenya, during the 2009/2010 RSV season. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken every 3 to 4 days and screened for RSV using a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The amount of virus shed was quantified by calculating the ‘area under the curve’ using the trapezoidal rule applied to rescaled PCR cycle threshold output. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify correlates of amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Results: The median quantity of virus shed per infection episode was 29.4 (95% CI: 15.2, 54.2) log10 ribonucleic acid (RNA) copies. Young age (<1 year), presence of upper respiratory symptoms, intra-household acquisition of infection, an individual’s first infection episode in the RSV season, and having a co-infection of RSV group A and B were associated with increased amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Conclusions: The findings provide insight into which groups of individuals have higher potential for transmission, information which may be useful in designing RSV prevention strategies.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marks, Sarah;
    Publisher: SAGE
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT

    This article will briefly explore some of the ways in which the past has been used as a means to talk about psychotherapy as a practice and as a profession, its impact on individuals and society, and the ethical debates at stake. It will show how, despite the multiple and competing claims about psychotherapy’s history and its meanings, historians themselves have, to a large degree, not attended to the intellectual and cultural development of many therapeutic approaches. This absence has the potential consequence of implying that therapies have emerged as value-free techniques, outside of a social, economic and political context. The relative neglect of psychotherapy, by contrast with the attention historians have paid to other professions, particularly psychiatry, has also underplayed its societal impact. This article will foreground some of the instances where psychotherapy has become an object of emerging historical interest, including the new research that forms the substance of this special issue of History of the Human Sciences.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reis, Pedro;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Country: Portugal
    Project: WT

    The exercise of Environmental Citizenship is strongly associated with a citizen’s capacity to act in society as an agent of change (ENEC 2018), and this depends on the development of a person’s willingness and competence for a critical, active and democratic engagement in preventing and solving environmental problems. There is a call for a citizenry that is well informed and empowered to take appropriate actions on the seriousness of the environmental problems affecting our world (Gray et al. 2009; Hodson 2003). However, many citizens do not feel empowered enough to participate in decision-making processes regarding socio-environmental issues, and, at the same time, the faith and trust in politicians have decreased, and political apathy is gaining ground (Hodson 2014). Throughout the past decade, the surge in authoritarian government practices, the failure of popular movements to replace undemocratic regimes and the increase in populist movements all over the world are fuelling concerns about a possible ‘democratic recession’ (Diamond 2015). Part of the success of this movement has been credited to the failures in mobilising young people’s political participation (Schulz et al. 2018; Jackson et al. 2016). Civic engagement depends on students and their ‘motivation to participate in civic activities, their confidence in the effectiveness of their participation, and their beliefs about their own capacity to become actively involved’ (Schulz et al. 2018, p. 72). Research shows that a student’s civic engagement can be supported and encouraged by school, with the help of (1) open school climates, (2) democratic structures within schools and (3) early opportunities for active participation, the promotion of students’ civic knowledge and the predisposition to engage in civic activities in the future (Schulz et al. 2018; Pancer 2015; Roth and Barton 2004). Therefore, education represents a key element in counteracting low levels of civic engagement among young people, namely, through the promotion of democratic activism (Hodson 2014).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kaye, TL; West, NP; Jayne, DJ; Tolan, DJ;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT
  • Other research product . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Singh, Satwant;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT

    The theme of this contextual statement is Hoarding Disorder (HD), which can be defined as a failure to discard possessions, which may be useless or of little value, resulting in excessive clutter that precludes activities for which the living space was originally intended. Individuals with HD have a strong emotional and sentimental attachment to these items resulting in the experience or perceived high levels of distress at the thought of discarding them.\ud \ud Hoarding disorder is a relatively new disorder. Within this contextual statement, I will demonstrate how I contributed to the increased awareness and understanding of this disorder in the United Kingdom in four key areas outlined below which is the basis of the public works that are being presented for consideration of the award Doctorate in Psychotherapy by Public Works:\ud \ud • RAISING AWARENESS AND UNDERSTANDING\ud As a relatively new disorder, there has been a lack of understanding and awareness of this condition across the professional domains. I have been involved in raising the understanding and awareness of HD and its impact on the individuals, community, environment and professions through radio interviews, teaching and training and providing consultations to individuals, professionals and organisations. This has also influenced and contributed to the development of protocols for engaging those who have hoarding issues.\ud \ud • RESEARCH COLLABORATION\ud My personal experiences of providing therapy, observations, reflections and reflexivity led me to undertake private and collaborative research with a range of professionals and variety of fields to improve understanding of the disorder.\ud This collaborative work has helped develop innovative and creative interventions that led to the development of the London Hoarding Treatment Group model.\ud \ud • DISSEMINATION\ud As part of good practice and to improve the quality of life for individuals who engage in hoarding behaviours I have been actively disseminating research findings, treatment practices through teaching and training, while presenting at national and international conferences and peer review journal publications. I have contributing to the field by offering expertise, knowledge and skills by undertaking professional reviews for professional journals for academic articles submitted for publications.\ud \ud • TREATMENT MODEL\ud The impact of my personal experiences of providing treatment, undertaking both private and collaborative research, developing creative and innovative interventions has led to the development of the London Hoarding Treatment Group model. There have been a number of self-help books published on HD. This treatment model has been published as the UK’s first self-help book titled Overcoming Hoarding and led to the development of the smart phone app titled Reclaim your space and life.\ud \ud Part 1 contains a summary of the Public Works, a timeline, an introduction to HD, and the practice of engagement in narrative inquiry and reflexivity on which I based my personal and professional development in relation to my professional practice and in the development of my interest in HD. \ud \ud Part 2 describes the Public Works, the knowledge and skills, collaborative work and challenges faced and achievements in the development of the works, and how I have applied them in the development of my influence in increasing the awareness and treatment of HD and the impact it has had on the field. I will draw on the work I have produced in relation to HD between the periods of 2011 to 2016. I will refer to my earlier works in Part 1 between 2004 and 2010 to set the context, demonstrate my interest in HD and the journey of my personal and professional development in this field. I will conclude with a critical reflection on the development of awareness, understanding, and treatment for HD and outline future development in this area.\ud \ud Part 3 contains examples of the Public Works and supporting evidence.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hang'ombe, BM; Ziwa, M; Haule, M; Nakamura, I; Samui, KL; Kaile, D; Mweene, AS; Kilonzo, BS; Lyamuya, EF; Matee, M; +3 more
    Publisher: AOSIS
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | One Medicine Africa-UK Re... (087546)
search
Include:
93 Research products, page 1 of 10
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Scholtens, Salome; Postma, Dirkje S.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Panasevich, Sviatlana; Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Melen, Erik; Nyberg, Fredrik; Pershagen, Goeran; Jarvis, Deborah; +44 more
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT | A second-generation genom... (084703)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gaspar, Rui; Domingos, Samuel; Diniz, António M.; Falanga, Roberto;
    Publisher: IGI Global
    Country: Portugal
    Project: FCT | UID/PSI/04810/2013 (UID/PSI/04810/2013), WT

    Non-adherence to health recommendations (e.g. medical prescriptions) presents potential costs for healthcare, which could be prevented or mitigated. This is often attributed to a person’s rational choice, to not adhere. However, this may also be determined by individual and contextual factors implied in the recommendations communication process. In accordance, this chapter focuses specifically on barriers to and facilitators of adherence to recommendations and engagement with the healthcare process, particularly concerning the communication between health professionals and patients. For this, the authors present examples of engagement increment through different degrees of participation, from a one-way/directive towards a two-way/engaging communication process. This focuses specifically on a vulnerable population group with increasing healthcare needs: older adults. Future possibilities for two-way engaging communications are discussed, aimed at promoting increased adherence to health recommendations and people’s self-regulation of their own health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Deans, Zandra C.; Costa, Jose Luis; Cree, Ian; Dequeker, Els; Edsjo, Anders; Henderson, Shirley; Hummel, Michael; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Loddo, Marco; Machado, Jose Carlos; +12 more
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT

    The clinical demand for mutation detection within multiple genes from a single tumour sample requires molecular diagnostic laboratories to develop rapid, high-throughput, highly sensitive, accurate and parallel testing within tight budget constraints. To meet this demand, many laboratories employ next-generation sequencing (NGS) based on small amplicons. Building on existing publications and general guidance for the clinical use of NGS and learnings from germline testing, the following guidelines establish consensus standards for somatic diagnostic testing, specifically for identifying and reporting mutations in solid tumours. These guidelines cover the testing strategy, implementation of testing within clinical service, sample requirements, data analysis and reporting of results. In conjunction with appropriate staff training and international standards for laboratory testing, these consensus standards for the use of NGS in molecular pathology of solid tumours will assist laboratories in implementing NGS in clinical services.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dijk, E.M.S.; Dimitropoulos, Harry; Iatropoulou, Katerina; Foufoulas, Ioannis;
    Publisher: OpenAIRE2020
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: WT , EC | OpenAIRE2020 (643410)

    This deliverable relates to the work carried out under task T8.3, “Research Impact Services”. The task’s focus is on the development of pilots with selected National funding agencies and infrastructure initiatives in order to serve them with the OpenAIRE research impact suite of services. A major service that OpenAIRE provides is the linking of research results to funding. Aside from importing the links from the repositories and journals, OpenAIRE designs, develops and enhances mining algorithms that identify and extract funding information from the text of scientific publications. With the help of NOADs we have initiated bi-lateral, often informal, collaborations with national funding agencies to facilitate mining extraction on their data. This is an on-going activity throughout the duration of the project. Currently the national funding agencies that we are working with are: FCT (Portugal), ARC (Australia), NHMRC (Australia), NSF & NIH (USA), SFI (Ireland), “Ministry of Science Education and Sport” & "Croatian Science Foundation” (Croatia), NWO (Netherlands), and DFG (Germany). This deliverable describes the nature of the data of the identified National funding agencies, as well as their export technologies, and provides the specification of the general-purpose OpenAIRE services required to support research impact measurements.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wathuo, Miriam; Medley, Graham; Nokes, D. James; Munywoki, Patrick K.;
    Publisher: F1000Research
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Household transmission of... (090853), WT | Defining pathways of resp... (102975)

    Background: A better understanding of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) epidemiology requires realistic estimates of RSV shedding patterns, quantities shed, and identification of the related underlying factors.\ud \ud Methods: RSV infection data arise from a cohort study of 47 households with 493 occupants, in coastal Kenya, during the 2009/2010 RSV season. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken every 3 to 4 days and screened for RSV using a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The amount of virus shed was quantified by calculating the ‘area under the curve’ using the trapezoidal rule applied to rescaled PCR cycle threshold output. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify correlates of amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Results: The median quantity of virus shed per infection episode was 29.4 (95% CI: 15.2, 54.2) log10 ribonucleic acid (RNA) copies. Young age (<1 year), presence of upper respiratory symptoms, intra-household acquisition of infection, an individual’s first infection episode in the RSV season, and having a co-infection of RSV group A and B were associated with increased amount of virus shed.\ud \ud Conclusions: The findings provide insight into which groups of individuals have higher potential for transmission, information which may be useful in designing RSV prevention strategies.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Marks, Sarah;
    Publisher: SAGE
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT

    This article will briefly explore some of the ways in which the past has been used as a means to talk about psychotherapy as a practice and as a profession, its impact on individuals and society, and the ethical debates at stake. It will show how, despite the multiple and competing claims about psychotherapy’s history and its meanings, historians themselves have, to a large degree, not attended to the intellectual and cultural development of many therapeutic approaches. This absence has the potential consequence of implying that therapies have emerged as value-free techniques, outside of a social, economic and political context. The relative neglect of psychotherapy, by contrast with the attention historians have paid to other professions, particularly psychiatry, has also underplayed its societal impact. This article will foreground some of the instances where psychotherapy has become an object of emerging historical interest, including the new research that forms the substance of this special issue of History of the Human Sciences.

  • Other research product . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Reis, Pedro;
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Country: Portugal
    Project: WT

    The exercise of Environmental Citizenship is strongly associated with a citizen’s capacity to act in society as an agent of change (ENEC 2018), and this depends on the development of a person’s willingness and competence for a critical, active and democratic engagement in preventing and solving environmental problems. There is a call for a citizenry that is well informed and empowered to take appropriate actions on the seriousness of the environmental problems affecting our world (Gray et al. 2009; Hodson 2003). However, many citizens do not feel empowered enough to participate in decision-making processes regarding socio-environmental issues, and, at the same time, the faith and trust in politicians have decreased, and political apathy is gaining ground (Hodson 2014). Throughout the past decade, the surge in authoritarian government practices, the failure of popular movements to replace undemocratic regimes and the increase in populist movements all over the world are fuelling concerns about a possible ‘democratic recession’ (Diamond 2015). Part of the success of this movement has been credited to the failures in mobilising young people’s political participation (Schulz et al. 2018; Jackson et al. 2016). Civic engagement depends on students and their ‘motivation to participate in civic activities, their confidence in the effectiveness of their participation, and their beliefs about their own capacity to become actively involved’ (Schulz et al. 2018, p. 72). Research shows that a student’s civic engagement can be supported and encouraged by school, with the help of (1) open school climates, (2) democratic structures within schools and (3) early opportunities for active participation, the promotion of students’ civic knowledge and the predisposition to engage in civic activities in the future (Schulz et al. 2018; Pancer 2015; Roth and Barton 2004). Therefore, education represents a key element in counteracting low levels of civic engagement among young people, namely, through the promotion of democratic activism (Hodson 2014).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kaye, TL; West, NP; Jayne, DJ; Tolan, DJ;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT
  • Other research product . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Singh, Satwant;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT

    The theme of this contextual statement is Hoarding Disorder (HD), which can be defined as a failure to discard possessions, which may be useless or of little value, resulting in excessive clutter that precludes activities for which the living space was originally intended. Individuals with HD have a strong emotional and sentimental attachment to these items resulting in the experience or perceived high levels of distress at the thought of discarding them.\ud \ud Hoarding disorder is a relatively new disorder. Within this contextual statement, I will demonstrate how I contributed to the increased awareness and understanding of this disorder in the United Kingdom in four key areas outlined below which is the basis of the public works that are being presented for consideration of the award Doctorate in Psychotherapy by Public Works:\ud \ud • RAISING AWARENESS AND UNDERSTANDING\ud As a relatively new disorder, there has been a lack of understanding and awareness of this condition across the professional domains. I have been involved in raising the understanding and awareness of HD and its impact on the individuals, community, environment and professions through radio interviews, teaching and training and providing consultations to individuals, professionals and organisations. This has also influenced and contributed to the development of protocols for engaging those who have hoarding issues.\ud \ud • RESEARCH COLLABORATION\ud My personal experiences of providing therapy, observations, reflections and reflexivity led me to undertake private and collaborative research with a range of professionals and variety of fields to improve understanding of the disorder.\ud This collaborative work has helped develop innovative and creative interventions that led to the development of the London Hoarding Treatment Group model.\ud \ud • DISSEMINATION\ud As part of good practice and to improve the quality of life for individuals who engage in hoarding behaviours I have been actively disseminating research findings, treatment practices through teaching and training, while presenting at national and international conferences and peer review journal publications. I have contributing to the field by offering expertise, knowledge and skills by undertaking professional reviews for professional journals for academic articles submitted for publications.\ud \ud • TREATMENT MODEL\ud The impact of my personal experiences of providing treatment, undertaking both private and collaborative research, developing creative and innovative interventions has led to the development of the London Hoarding Treatment Group model. There have been a number of self-help books published on HD. This treatment model has been published as the UK’s first self-help book titled Overcoming Hoarding and led to the development of the smart phone app titled Reclaim your space and life.\ud \ud Part 1 contains a summary of the Public Works, a timeline, an introduction to HD, and the practice of engagement in narrative inquiry and reflexivity on which I based my personal and professional development in relation to my professional practice and in the development of my interest in HD. \ud \ud Part 2 describes the Public Works, the knowledge and skills, collaborative work and challenges faced and achievements in the development of the works, and how I have applied them in the development of my influence in increasing the awareness and treatment of HD and the impact it has had on the field. I will draw on the work I have produced in relation to HD between the periods of 2011 to 2016. I will refer to my earlier works in Part 1 between 2004 and 2010 to set the context, demonstrate my interest in HD and the journey of my personal and professional development in this field. I will conclude with a critical reflection on the development of awareness, understanding, and treatment for HD and outline future development in this area.\ud \ud Part 3 contains examples of the Public Works and supporting evidence.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hang'ombe, BM; Ziwa, M; Haule, M; Nakamura, I; Samui, KL; Kaile, D; Mweene, AS; Kilonzo, BS; Lyamuya, EF; Matee, M; +3 more
    Publisher: AOSIS
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: WT | One Medicine Africa-UK Re... (087546)
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