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  • Research data . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Jordi Carbonell Silva;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    DataSet de pàgines de bellesa i cosmètica natural per realitzar la pràctica 1 de l'assignatura de Tipologia i Cicle de Vida de les Dades. Aquests datasets han estat extrets per realitzar una pràctica universitària, és a dir, amb finalitats acadèmiques.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ranucci M; Bianchi P,; Cotza M; Beccaris C; Silvetti S; Isgrò G; Giamberti A; Baryshnikova E.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data set from Ranucci M, Bianchi P, Cotza M, Beccaris C, Silvetti S, Isgrò G, Giamberti A, Baryshnikova E. Fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss in low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery. Perfusion. 2019 Nov;34(8):629-636. doi: 10.1177/0267659119854246. Epub 2019 Jun 28. PMID: 31250738. This is the abstract: Introduction: Low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass are prone to dilution and consumption of soluble coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Low levels of fibrinogen may represent a possible cause of severe postoperative chest drain blood loss. The present study investigates the association between post-cardiopulmonary bypass fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss and severe bleeding, aiming to identify possible cut-off values to trigger specific interventions. Methods: Prospective cohort study on 77 patients weighing <10 kg undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Haemostasis and coagulation data were collected before surgery (standard tests and thromboelastometry), after protamine (thromboelastometry) and at the arrival in the intensive care unit (standard tests). The primary outcome variable was severe bleeding (chest drain blood loss >30 ml kg-1/24h). Results: Factors being independently associated with severe bleeding were the international normalized ratio and the fibrinogen levels at the arrival in the intensive care unit. Once corrected for other confounders, fibrinogen levels had an odds ratio of 0.2 (95% confidence interval = 0.011-0.54) per 1 gL-1 for severe bleeding. The discrimination power was fair (area under the curve = 0.770). The best cut-off value was identified at a fibrinogen level of 150 mg dL-1, with a sensitivity of 52%, a specificity of 85% and a positive predictive value of 60% for severe bleeding. Conclusion: Both a prolonged international normalized ratio and low fibrinogen levels were predictive for severe bleeding, underscoring the role of coagulation factors dilution and consumption in this specific patient population.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Kumar, Dinesh; Raj, Ritu; Dubey, Durgesh; Jain, Avinash; Guleria, Anupam; Kumar, Umesh; Mohit K Rai; Harshit Singh; Saurabh Chaturvedi; Durga P Misra; +2 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Tuberculosis (TB) -a pulmonary granulomatous disease- is the leading cause of death worldwide from a single infectious disease agent especially in developing countries such as India. Current diagnostic methodologies often lack specificity and sensitivity; therefore, there is an immense clinical interest to investigate alternative biomarker signatures for obtaining a conclusive and suggestive diagnosis of TB. Particular challenge arises for treating physicians while differentiating TB from sarcoidosis (SAR) which is an uncommon granulomatous disease and shares the similar clinical, radiological and pathological features with TB. Symptoms common in TB such as cough, fever, fatigue, and weight-loss are often manifested in sarcoidosis as well. As India accounts for more than 26% of global burden of TB cases and epidemiological data about sarcoidosis is unknown, most of the sarcoidosis patients end up receiving anti tubercular therapy (ATT) erroneously, leading to delayed proper treatment and considerable risk of drug induced toxicity, whereas lung damage continues to progress in this backdrop. Therefore, there is an urgent unmet need to identify non-invasive biomarker(s) for differentiating sarcoidosis from TB. Metabolomics analysis of serum holds great potential to provide distinctive patterns of metabolic profiles relevant to underlying disease processes and thus may aid in rapid clinical diagnosis and guiding appropriate treatment. Starting our efforts in this direction, the serum metabolic profiles of sarcoidosis and active TB patients were measured using 800 MHz NMR Spectroscopy and compared using the multivariate and univariate statistical analysis tools. The partial least square discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) revealed significant serum metabolic disparity between SAR and TB with respect to normal control subjects [1-5]. Compared to SAR, the sera of TB patients were characterized by (a) elevated levels of lactate, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), glutamate and succinate (b) decreased levels of glucose, citrate, pyruvate, glutamine, and various lipid and membrane metabolites (such as very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL), polyunsaturated fatty acids, etc.). The altered circulatory levels of glucose (decreased) and lactate (increased) were found well consistent with previous report [6] demonstrating that infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. A very recent study reported increased production of glutamate from mitochondrial glutaminolysis and pleiotropic roles of glutamine metabolism in the metabolic reprogramming of MTb infected M1-like macrophages [7]. A previous study published in Science [8] reported the suppression of oxidative stress by 3HB. Another study published in scientific report demonstrated that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) secretory protein ESAT-induces GLUT-1 mediated enhanced glucose uptake by macrophages and increased fatty acid biosynthesis (to drive foamy macrophage differentiation) which in turn results in release of 3HB in the extracellular environment [9]. Based on previously reported metabolic derangements in MTb infected systems and our results derived from NMR-based serum metabolomics, the following remarks have been drawn: Active TB infection induces Warburg effect as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glucose and elevated levels of lactate Active TB infection causes increased biosynthesis of fatty acids as inferred from the decreased serum levels of citrate and increased levels of acetate and 3-Hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) Active TB infection manipulates oxidative stress (OS) induced pathogen killing host-defense mechanism as inferred from decreased circulatory phenylalanine-to-tyrosine ratio (PTR) and 3HB (known to suppress OS) Active TB infection induces augmented utilization of glutamine (an immunomodulatory nutrient) as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glutamine and increased serum levels of glutamate and succinate Active TB infection induces dyslipidemia as inferred from the decreased NMR signals of very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) References: Dinesh Kumar, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain , Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis” (Conference paper presented during IRACON-2018). F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (DOI: 10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1) Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Ritu Raj, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Targeted nuclear magnetic resonance-based serum metabolomics analysis revealed significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio in pulmonary sarcoidosis patients compared to tuberculosis patients”, (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0034) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit Kumar Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga Prasanna Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based Serum Metabolomics in Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis – Search for a Biomarker”, (Received Best Oral Award) (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0030) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335). Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal, “Diagnostic panel of biomarkers for the assessment of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis identified using NMR based serum metabolomics approach” (Poster Presented during BSRAC-2018) F1000Research (2018), 7:18 (doi: 10.7490/f1000research.1115194.1) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based serum metabolomics in sarcoidosis and tuberculosis: search for a biomarker” (Poster Presentation during British Society for Rheumatology Annual Conference 2018 | BSRAC-2018) Rheumatology (April 2018), Vol 57, Issue suppl_3 (DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/key075.338). Shi, L., Salamon, H., Eugenin, E.A., Pine, R., Cooper, A. and Gennaro, M.L., 2015. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-13. Jiang, Qingkui, and Lanbo Shi. "Coordination of the uptake and metabolism of amino acids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages." Frontiers in Immunology 12 (2021). Shimazu, T., Hirschey, M.D., Newman, J., He, W., Shirakawa, K., Le Moan, N., Grueter, C.A., Lim, H., Saunders, L.R., Stevens, R.D. and Newgard, C.B., 2013. Suppression of oxidative stress by β-hydroxybutyrate, an endogenous histone deacetylase inhibitor. Science, 339(6116), pp.211-214. Singh, V., Kaur, C., Chaudhary, V.K., Rao, K.V. and Chatterjee, S., 2015. M. tuberculosis secretory protein ESAT-6 induces metabolic flux perturbations to drive foamy macrophage differentiation. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-12. {"references": ["Dinesh Kumar*, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain, Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K. Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal*. Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis [version 1; not peer reviewed]. F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (poster) (https://doi.org/10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1)"]}

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Hans-Bianchi, Barbara; Balsamo, Camilla; De Lauretis, Lorenzo;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    ENDE corpus aligned translation corpus ENG - PDC, lemmatised and POS-annotated www.deitsch.eu

  • Research data . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Raphael Susewind;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This deposit serves as a long-term archive for the unprocessed raw data behind the uprolls2018 table in my comprehensive dataset on religion and politics in India, which is available at https://github.com/raphael-susewind/india-religion-politics/tree/master/uprolls2018

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Abdul Razak, Siti Fatimah;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data collected from 818 respondents who are licensed drivers in Malaysia.an online survey which was designed to assess drivers perception on advanced driver assistance systems. Questions include a demographic and driving behaviour, the perceptions of benefits and obstacles relevant to the use of advanced driver assistance systems, vehicle decision-making, and technology use.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Da Silva, Daniel Queirós; Santos, Luís Carlos; Santos, Filipe Neves Dos;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Dataset of several ROS2 bags acquired using a handheld OAK-D sensor in a forest area in Cantanhede, Portugal (40.369405, -8.658751). The bags are composed by RGB images, Stereo images, Depth images and IMU data of an OAK-D sensor. The images of this dataset have data of eucalyptus and pine trees.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Folpp, Heath; Schilling, Hayden T.; Clark, Graeme; Lowry, Michael; Maslen, Ben; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Code and Data for Folpp et al (in Review) Artificial reefs increase fish biomass in habitat-limited estuaries

  • Research data . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Susewind, Raphael;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This deposit serves as a long-term archive for the unprocessed raw data behind the uprolls2018 table in my comprehensive dataset on religion and politics in India, which is available at https://github.com/raphael-susewind/india-religion-politics/tree/master/uprolls2018

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Eleonora Vitali; Eleonora Palagano; Maria Lucia Schiavone; Giovanna Mantovani; Cristina Sobacchi; Gherardo Mazziotti; Andrea Lania;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This record contains data related to article" Direct effects of octreotide on osteoblast cell proliferation and function". Purpose. Octreotide (OCT) is a first-generation somatostatin analog (SSA) used in the treatment of acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In both diseases, OCT interacts with somatostatin receptors 2 and 5 (SSTR2 and SSTR5), inhibiting hormone hypersecretion and cell proliferation. Skeletal health is an important clinical concern with acromegaly and NETs since acromegalic osteopathy and NET bone metastasis occur in a remarkable number of patients. While OCT’s effect on NET cells has been extensively investigated, its direct action on bone cells remains unknown. Methods. Here we investigated OCT direct effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, mineralization, and chemoattractant capacity of murine primary osteoblasts and osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. Results. OCT inhibited osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation (-30% ± 16%, and -22 ± 4%, both p<0.05) and increased MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis (+76 ± 32%, p<0.05 vs control). The anti-proliferative action of OCT was mediated by SSTR2 and SSTR5 in MC3T3-E1, while its proapoptotic effect was abrogated in SSTR2-silenced cells. The analysis of genes related to the early and late phases of osteoblast differentiation showed that OCT did not affect Alp, Runx2, Bglap, Spp1, and Sost levels in MC3T3-E1 cells. Similarly, OCT had no effect on ALP activity and mineralization in osteoblasts. In addition, Vegfa expression decreased in OCT-treated MC3T3-E1 cells and OCT inhibited pancreatic NET cell migration towards osteoblast-conditioned medium. Conclusion.This study provides the first evidence of the direct action of OCT on osteoblasts which may have clinically relevant implications for the management of skeletal health in subjects with acromegaly and metastatic NETs.

search
Include:
9,159 Research products, page 1 of 916
  • Research data . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Jordi Carbonell Silva;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    DataSet de pàgines de bellesa i cosmètica natural per realitzar la pràctica 1 de l'assignatura de Tipologia i Cicle de Vida de les Dades. Aquests datasets han estat extrets per realitzar una pràctica universitària, és a dir, amb finalitats acadèmiques.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ranucci M; Bianchi P,; Cotza M; Beccaris C; Silvetti S; Isgrò G; Giamberti A; Baryshnikova E.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data set from Ranucci M, Bianchi P, Cotza M, Beccaris C, Silvetti S, Isgrò G, Giamberti A, Baryshnikova E. Fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss in low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery. Perfusion. 2019 Nov;34(8):629-636. doi: 10.1177/0267659119854246. Epub 2019 Jun 28. PMID: 31250738. This is the abstract: Introduction: Low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass are prone to dilution and consumption of soluble coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Low levels of fibrinogen may represent a possible cause of severe postoperative chest drain blood loss. The present study investigates the association between post-cardiopulmonary bypass fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss and severe bleeding, aiming to identify possible cut-off values to trigger specific interventions. Methods: Prospective cohort study on 77 patients weighing <10 kg undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Haemostasis and coagulation data were collected before surgery (standard tests and thromboelastometry), after protamine (thromboelastometry) and at the arrival in the intensive care unit (standard tests). The primary outcome variable was severe bleeding (chest drain blood loss >30 ml kg-1/24h). Results: Factors being independently associated with severe bleeding were the international normalized ratio and the fibrinogen levels at the arrival in the intensive care unit. Once corrected for other confounders, fibrinogen levels had an odds ratio of 0.2 (95% confidence interval = 0.011-0.54) per 1 gL-1 for severe bleeding. The discrimination power was fair (area under the curve = 0.770). The best cut-off value was identified at a fibrinogen level of 150 mg dL-1, with a sensitivity of 52%, a specificity of 85% and a positive predictive value of 60% for severe bleeding. Conclusion: Both a prolonged international normalized ratio and low fibrinogen levels were predictive for severe bleeding, underscoring the role of coagulation factors dilution and consumption in this specific patient population.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Kumar, Dinesh; Raj, Ritu; Dubey, Durgesh; Jain, Avinash; Guleria, Anupam; Kumar, Umesh; Mohit K Rai; Harshit Singh; Saurabh Chaturvedi; Durga P Misra; +2 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Tuberculosis (TB) -a pulmonary granulomatous disease- is the leading cause of death worldwide from a single infectious disease agent especially in developing countries such as India. Current diagnostic methodologies often lack specificity and sensitivity; therefore, there is an immense clinical interest to investigate alternative biomarker signatures for obtaining a conclusive and suggestive diagnosis of TB. Particular challenge arises for treating physicians while differentiating TB from sarcoidosis (SAR) which is an uncommon granulomatous disease and shares the similar clinical, radiological and pathological features with TB. Symptoms common in TB such as cough, fever, fatigue, and weight-loss are often manifested in sarcoidosis as well. As India accounts for more than 26% of global burden of TB cases and epidemiological data about sarcoidosis is unknown, most of the sarcoidosis patients end up receiving anti tubercular therapy (ATT) erroneously, leading to delayed proper treatment and considerable risk of drug induced toxicity, whereas lung damage continues to progress in this backdrop. Therefore, there is an urgent unmet need to identify non-invasive biomarker(s) for differentiating sarcoidosis from TB. Metabolomics analysis of serum holds great potential to provide distinctive patterns of metabolic profiles relevant to underlying disease processes and thus may aid in rapid clinical diagnosis and guiding appropriate treatment. Starting our efforts in this direction, the serum metabolic profiles of sarcoidosis and active TB patients were measured using 800 MHz NMR Spectroscopy and compared using the multivariate and univariate statistical analysis tools. The partial least square discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) revealed significant serum metabolic disparity between SAR and TB with respect to normal control subjects [1-5]. Compared to SAR, the sera of TB patients were characterized by (a) elevated levels of lactate, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), glutamate and succinate (b) decreased levels of glucose, citrate, pyruvate, glutamine, and various lipid and membrane metabolites (such as very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL), polyunsaturated fatty acids, etc.). The altered circulatory levels of glucose (decreased) and lactate (increased) were found well consistent with previous report [6] demonstrating that infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. A very recent study reported increased production of glutamate from mitochondrial glutaminolysis and pleiotropic roles of glutamine metabolism in the metabolic reprogramming of MTb infected M1-like macrophages [7]. A previous study published in Science [8] reported the suppression of oxidative stress by 3HB. Another study published in scientific report demonstrated that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) secretory protein ESAT-induces GLUT-1 mediated enhanced glucose uptake by macrophages and increased fatty acid biosynthesis (to drive foamy macrophage differentiation) which in turn results in release of 3HB in the extracellular environment [9]. Based on previously reported metabolic derangements in MTb infected systems and our results derived from NMR-based serum metabolomics, the following remarks have been drawn: Active TB infection induces Warburg effect as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glucose and elevated levels of lactate Active TB infection causes increased biosynthesis of fatty acids as inferred from the decreased serum levels of citrate and increased levels of acetate and 3-Hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) Active TB infection manipulates oxidative stress (OS) induced pathogen killing host-defense mechanism as inferred from decreased circulatory phenylalanine-to-tyrosine ratio (PTR) and 3HB (known to suppress OS) Active TB infection induces augmented utilization of glutamine (an immunomodulatory nutrient) as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glutamine and increased serum levels of glutamate and succinate Active TB infection induces dyslipidemia as inferred from the decreased NMR signals of very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) References: Dinesh Kumar, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain , Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis” (Conference paper presented during IRACON-2018). F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (DOI: 10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1) Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Ritu Raj, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Targeted nuclear magnetic resonance-based serum metabolomics analysis revealed significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio in pulmonary sarcoidosis patients compared to tuberculosis patients”, (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0034) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit Kumar Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga Prasanna Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based Serum Metabolomics in Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis – Search for a Biomarker”, (Received Best Oral Award) (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0030) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335). Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal, “Diagnostic panel of biomarkers for the assessment of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis identified using NMR based serum metabolomics approach” (Poster Presented during BSRAC-2018) F1000Research (2018), 7:18 (doi: 10.7490/f1000research.1115194.1) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based serum metabolomics in sarcoidosis and tuberculosis: search for a biomarker” (Poster Presentation during British Society for Rheumatology Annual Conference 2018 | BSRAC-2018) Rheumatology (April 2018), Vol 57, Issue suppl_3 (DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/key075.338). Shi, L., Salamon, H., Eugenin, E.A., Pine, R., Cooper, A. and Gennaro, M.L., 2015. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-13. Jiang, Qingkui, and Lanbo Shi. "Coordination of the uptake and metabolism of amino acids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages." Frontiers in Immunology 12 (2021). Shimazu, T., Hirschey, M.D., Newman, J., He, W., Shirakawa, K., Le Moan, N., Grueter, C.A., Lim, H., Saunders, L.R., Stevens, R.D. and Newgard, C.B., 2013. Suppression of oxidative stress by β-hydroxybutyrate, an endogenous histone deacetylase inhibitor. Science, 339(6116), pp.211-214. Singh, V., Kaur, C., Chaudhary, V.K., Rao, K.V. and Chatterjee, S., 2015. M. tuberculosis secretory protein ESAT-6 induces metabolic flux perturbations to drive foamy macrophage differentiation. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-12. {"references": ["Dinesh Kumar*, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain, Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K. Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal*. Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis [version 1; not peer reviewed]. F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (poster) (https://doi.org/10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1)"]}

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Hans-Bianchi, Barbara; Balsamo, Camilla; De Lauretis, Lorenzo;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    ENDE corpus aligned translation corpus ENG - PDC, lemmatised and POS-annotated www.deitsch.eu

  • Research data . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Raphael Susewind;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This deposit serves as a long-term archive for the unprocessed raw data behind the uprolls2018 table in my comprehensive dataset on religion and politics in India, which is available at https://github.com/raphael-susewind/india-religion-politics/tree/master/uprolls2018

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Abdul Razak, Siti Fatimah;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data collected from 818 respondents who are licensed drivers in Malaysia.an online survey which was designed to assess drivers perception on advanced driver assistance systems. Questions include a demographic and driving behaviour, the perceptions of benefits and obstacles relevant to the use of advanced driver assistance systems, vehicle decision-making, and technology use.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Da Silva, Daniel Queirós; Santos, Luís Carlos; Santos, Filipe Neves Dos;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Dataset of several ROS2 bags acquired using a handheld OAK-D sensor in a forest area in Cantanhede, Portugal (40.369405, -8.658751). The bags are composed by RGB images, Stereo images, Depth images and IMU data of an OAK-D sensor. The images of this dataset have data of eucalyptus and pine trees.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Folpp, Heath; Schilling, Hayden T.; Clark, Graeme; Lowry, Michael; Maslen, Ben; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Code and Data for Folpp et al (in Review) Artificial reefs increase fish biomass in habitat-limited estuaries

  • Research data . 2022
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Susewind, Raphael;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This deposit serves as a long-term archive for the unprocessed raw data behind the uprolls2018 table in my comprehensive dataset on religion and politics in India, which is available at https://github.com/raphael-susewind/india-religion-politics/tree/master/uprolls2018

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Eleonora Vitali; Eleonora Palagano; Maria Lucia Schiavone; Giovanna Mantovani; Cristina Sobacchi; Gherardo Mazziotti; Andrea Lania;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This record contains data related to article" Direct effects of octreotide on osteoblast cell proliferation and function". Purpose. Octreotide (OCT) is a first-generation somatostatin analog (SSA) used in the treatment of acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). In both diseases, OCT interacts with somatostatin receptors 2 and 5 (SSTR2 and SSTR5), inhibiting hormone hypersecretion and cell proliferation. Skeletal health is an important clinical concern with acromegaly and NETs since acromegalic osteopathy and NET bone metastasis occur in a remarkable number of patients. While OCT’s effect on NET cells has been extensively investigated, its direct action on bone cells remains unknown. Methods. Here we investigated OCT direct effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, mineralization, and chemoattractant capacity of murine primary osteoblasts and osteoblast cell line MC3T3-E1. Results. OCT inhibited osteoblasts and MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation (-30% ± 16%, and -22 ± 4%, both p<0.05) and increased MC3T3-E1 cell apoptosis (+76 ± 32%, p<0.05 vs control). The anti-proliferative action of OCT was mediated by SSTR2 and SSTR5 in MC3T3-E1, while its proapoptotic effect was abrogated in SSTR2-silenced cells. The analysis of genes related to the early and late phases of osteoblast differentiation showed that OCT did not affect Alp, Runx2, Bglap, Spp1, and Sost levels in MC3T3-E1 cells. Similarly, OCT had no effect on ALP activity and mineralization in osteoblasts. In addition, Vegfa expression decreased in OCT-treated MC3T3-E1 cells and OCT inhibited pancreatic NET cell migration towards osteoblast-conditioned medium. Conclusion.This study provides the first evidence of the direct action of OCT on osteoblasts which may have clinically relevant implications for the management of skeletal health in subjects with acromegaly and metastatic NETs.

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