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  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Jocelyne Bourgeois;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Since 1982, snow pit samples have been collected for pollen analysis from the top of ice caps in the Canadian Arctic during the annual glacier mass balance survey. Other glacier and ice cap sites, and Arctic Ocean sea ice locations have been sampled sporadically since 1982 in order to obtain a better coverage of pollen deposition. Through IPY, and in conjunction with other field activities, the Mount Oxford ice field, in Quttinirpaaq National Park, northern Ellesmere Island and the NEEM ice core drilling site, in north-west Greenland, were added to the list. At both sites, four snow layers were collected per year of accumulation. These correspond, more or less, to seasons. At Mount Oxford, the record covers 6 years (2002-2008), while at NEEM, it covers 3 years of snow accumulation. On Agassiz Ice Cap, Ellesmere Island, the seasonal pollen deposition record is continuous from 1982 to 2008. Pollen concentrations are typically low on Arctic ice caps (~ 2-50 pollen grains / L). However, on Agassiz Ice Cap, the data show the number of pollen in the snow has been increasing since the mid-1990.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Steven H. Ferguson; Tara Bortoluzzi; various local hunters;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Biological samples and information were gathered from ringed and bearded seals by local hunters during annual community subsistance harvests in the community. Biological samples gathered by hunters include: blubber (fist size), liver, muscle (fist size), kidney, lower jaw, reproductive tract, stomach, intestine, blood (5 ml), and a small muscle sample in DMFO (for genetic analysis). Other sample information collected includes: species, sex, date and time of harvest, location, GPS coordinates, habitat, total length, axillary girth, hips girth, fat depth, body weight, and sculp weight. These biological samples and related information were collected from 25 ringed seals and 15 bearded seals in 2008. All samples are stored at -25C.

  • Research data . 2017
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Zhang, Nicole; Johnstone, Graham; Coppens, Jarod; Kawamoto, Cory;
    Publisher: Borealis

    This is the data from group 6, with a focus on energy in climate change. This dataset contains our excel worksheets, research notebook, podcast file, presentation slides, and final deliverable.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Lévesque, Esther; Gérin-Lajoie, José; Elatiak, Doris; Henry, Greg; Interviewees from Kugluktuk;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    With the help of a local interpreter, semi-structured interviews were conducted with Elders and people still active on the land. Old and actual berry picking sites were identified on maps to evaluate spatial and temporal variability in vegetation and berry production. Interviews were recorded, filmed and transcribed. Similar projects are ongoing in Kangiqsualujjuaq, Kangiqsujuaq and Umiujaq (Nunavik) as well as in Pangnirtung, Baker Lake and Pond Inlet (Nunavut), and Nain (Nunatsiavut).

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Scott, Neal; Treitz, Paul; Arruda, Sean;
    Publisher: Queen's University Dataverse

    In 2015, Automated Soil CO2 Exchange (ACE) Stations were deployed at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO) to quantify the contribution of CO2 exchange from wet sedge vegetation. The wet sedge vegetation type is of specific interest as it is the most productive community type in the High Arctic. These communities are commonly regarded in past studies as carbon sinks during their entire growing season, although the scale and key controls are not completely understood. In addition, warming of the High Arctic enhances wet sedge growth, which may result in an increase of the percentage of land occupied by wet sedge meadows. This in turn has the capability of significantly altering the carbon balance of high Arctic landscapes. The objective of these data files is to determine the CO2 exchange rate in these settings, utilizing the ACE systems. The measurements from each chamber were automatically recorded every 30 minutes from July 3 2015 to August 7 2015. Active layer depth, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil temperature and soil moisture measurements were also collected in conjunction with the net CO2 exchange rate (NCER). The r esults indicate that wet sedge vegetation in this area does represent a carbon sink through photosynthetic processes.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Turner, Kevin;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    These data comprise a suite of water chemistry parameters for 13 - 24 river or creek sites across Old Crow Flats, Yukon, Canada. The sampling record is for 2007 - 2012 (n = 13) and 2015 - 2019 (n = 24). Samples were collected mostly during June and late August/early September for the entire record, and for late July for the early record. Sampling sites span headwaters to high-order channels including the main tributaries (i.e., Johnson Creek, Schaeffer Creek, Blackfox Creek, King Edward Creek, Thomas Creek, Potato Creek) and seven locations along the Old Crow River. Data provide an indication of water chemistry spatial patterns across Old Crow Flats during 2007 - 2019. Ongoing synthesis is being used to identify how these spatial patterns are responding to climate-driven landscape changes.

  • Research data . 2021
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Petrik, Ronny; Geyer, Beate;
    Publisher: World Data Center for Climate (WDCC) at DKRZ

    Project: open feed-in time series based on a Renewable Energy Database - The dataset was produced in the framework of the project openFRED. The data are dedicated to force energy system models, i.e. relevant parameters for wind energy (gust estimates), for solar energy (direct normal irradiation) and hydropower (runoff). The project was founded by Bundesministeriums für Wirtschaft und Energie, FKZ: 0324006B. Summary: This is an atmospheric hindcast for Western Europe and the North Atlantic using COSMO-CLM version 5.0 with spectral nudging from 2002-2017. MERRA2 reanalysis data are used as forcing. Additionally transient and monthly aerosol data of the MACv2 climatology are prescribed. The model uses a rotated grid with 566 x 481 grid points and a grid point distance of 0.0625 degrees, the rotated North pole is located at 162.0 W, 39.25 N. The published data excludes the sponge zone and have 526 x 441 grid points. In rotated coordinates the published simulation data extends from 22.64 W to 10.18 E, 11.2 S to 16.3 N, in geographical coordinates this corresponds to about 12 W to 30 E, 39 N to 60 N. institution: Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Coastal Research, Germany source: int2lm_131101_2.00_clm4, COSMO-CLM5.0_clm14_aerosol_gust (available at DKRZ's LTA WDCC service) contact: http://coastmod.hzg.de originator: Ronny Petrik crs: EPSG:4326

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Hubert , Casey; Noel, Amy; Burt, Alexis; Cramm, Margaret; Kostka, Joel; Montoya, Oscar; Stern, Gary; Sun, Xiaoxu;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Geomicrobiology Methods: Sediment sampling using the box core included bulk surface sediment bags for incubation experiments (mock oil spills) and ethanol-preserved aliquots of sediment for further genomic analysis (DNA sequencing for microbial community composition and biodiversity) at multiple stations. Sediment push cores were sectioned and ethanol-preserved for genomic analysis. Water was collected on board using the CTD-Rosette at multiple stations. At each of the stations, bottom and surface water was collected and filtered on board for future molecular analysis. Mock oil spills consist of small bottles in which artificial seawater is combined with marine sediment and either diesel, bunker fuel or crude oil in different concentrations. Bottles are incubated under either oxic (air in the headspace of the sealed bottles) or anoxic (90:10 N2/CO2 headspace) in the bottles. Incubations are conducted both at 4°C to mimic cold ocean conditions, and at room temperature, which promotes a faster microbial response. Some experiments were set up on board, kept at 4°C, and transported back to Calgary while still incubating in coolers with data loggers to record the incubation temperature. Incubations last from weeks to months, during which time the experiments are subsampled for analysis of the crude oil or fuel composition (via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), oxygen and CO2 in the headspace (via gas chromatography) and sulphate in the aqueous phase (via ion chromatography). DNA extraction uses a modified bead beating approach either using commercial kits from MoBio (PowerSoil) or MP Biomedical (FastDNA Spin Kit) or using an in-house protocol. Using PCR, 16S rRNA genes from bulk environmental DNA extracts are amplified and purified for partial sequencing in the in-house Illumina MiSeq. Samples were made in July and August 2013 at stations 115, 176, 323, 600 and 633. In August and September 2014, stations KANE2B, KEN1, 304, 309, 312, 437, GSC11BC, 435, 407, 405 and 460 were sampled. In 2015, stations QMG3, QMG, 314, CB1 were sampled from August to November.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Fernie, Kim; Elliott, Kyle; Braune, Birgit; Head, Jessica; Letcher, Robert;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Research shows that the exposure of wildlife to chemical pollutants can elicit endocrine disruptive and behavioral effects. Such potential effects may occur in Arctic seabirds that must concurrently deal with rapid environmental changes relating to climate change. Because the endocrine system plays a critical role in allowing animals to respond to environmental stress (e.g., changing ice patterns), endocrine disruption could influence the ability of wildlife to respond to climate change. We are examining such interactions with thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) that feed from ice flows and breed in Hudson Bay, Canada. Reductions in ice result in the birds spending more energy to obtain less fish that may result in poorer reproductive success and chick development. We sought to determine whether a suite of contaminants that bioaccumulates in this species, and the influence of climate change, have an effect on avian wildlife by limiting their ability to respond to changes in ice availability. In 2016 through 2018, foraging behaviors and movements of > 67 thick-billed murres were tracked each year with GPS-accelerometers, and concentrations of thyroid hormones, corticosterone, total mercury (THg), a suite of flame retardants (FRs), and per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were measured in the plasma of individuals. Levels of all measured PFASs and FRs were consistently low and unrelated to hormones or behavior. However, THg concentrations were associated with circulating triiodothyronine (T3) prior to foraging. In contrast to a "medium-ice" year (2016), in a "low-ice" year (2017), the relationship between T3 and THg was negative. The T3 concentrations of the birds prior to foraging were associated with their foraging behavior; in contrast to 2016, higher levels of T3 were associated with lower diving rates. We found no associations with plasma corticosterone. GPS tracks demonstrated that birds foraged to the north of the colony during incubation when ice was present, then moved to forage to the northwest as chick-rearing progressed when ice was no longer present. These results suggest that birds were foraging near regions of floating ice, which may improve foraging success and reduce diving rates. Based on our 2016-17 findings, we tentatively conclude that THg may influence the ability of these seabirds to adjust to variation in ice cover, and will further examine our hypothesis with 2018 data collected under different environmental conditions.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Sozialwissenschaftliche Studiengesellschaft;
    Publisher: AUSSDA

    No abstract available

search
Include:
283 Research products, page 1 of 29
  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Jocelyne Bourgeois;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Since 1982, snow pit samples have been collected for pollen analysis from the top of ice caps in the Canadian Arctic during the annual glacier mass balance survey. Other glacier and ice cap sites, and Arctic Ocean sea ice locations have been sampled sporadically since 1982 in order to obtain a better coverage of pollen deposition. Through IPY, and in conjunction with other field activities, the Mount Oxford ice field, in Quttinirpaaq National Park, northern Ellesmere Island and the NEEM ice core drilling site, in north-west Greenland, were added to the list. At both sites, four snow layers were collected per year of accumulation. These correspond, more or less, to seasons. At Mount Oxford, the record covers 6 years (2002-2008), while at NEEM, it covers 3 years of snow accumulation. On Agassiz Ice Cap, Ellesmere Island, the seasonal pollen deposition record is continuous from 1982 to 2008. Pollen concentrations are typically low on Arctic ice caps (~ 2-50 pollen grains / L). However, on Agassiz Ice Cap, the data show the number of pollen in the snow has been increasing since the mid-1990.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Steven H. Ferguson; Tara Bortoluzzi; various local hunters;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Biological samples and information were gathered from ringed and bearded seals by local hunters during annual community subsistance harvests in the community. Biological samples gathered by hunters include: blubber (fist size), liver, muscle (fist size), kidney, lower jaw, reproductive tract, stomach, intestine, blood (5 ml), and a small muscle sample in DMFO (for genetic analysis). Other sample information collected includes: species, sex, date and time of harvest, location, GPS coordinates, habitat, total length, axillary girth, hips girth, fat depth, body weight, and sculp weight. These biological samples and related information were collected from 25 ringed seals and 15 bearded seals in 2008. All samples are stored at -25C.

  • Research data . 2017
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Zhang, Nicole; Johnstone, Graham; Coppens, Jarod; Kawamoto, Cory;
    Publisher: Borealis

    This is the data from group 6, with a focus on energy in climate change. This dataset contains our excel worksheets, research notebook, podcast file, presentation slides, and final deliverable.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Lévesque, Esther; Gérin-Lajoie, José; Elatiak, Doris; Henry, Greg; Interviewees from Kugluktuk;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    With the help of a local interpreter, semi-structured interviews were conducted with Elders and people still active on the land. Old and actual berry picking sites were identified on maps to evaluate spatial and temporal variability in vegetation and berry production. Interviews were recorded, filmed and transcribed. Similar projects are ongoing in Kangiqsualujjuaq, Kangiqsujuaq and Umiujaq (Nunavik) as well as in Pangnirtung, Baker Lake and Pond Inlet (Nunavut), and Nain (Nunatsiavut).

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Scott, Neal; Treitz, Paul; Arruda, Sean;
    Publisher: Queen's University Dataverse

    In 2015, Automated Soil CO2 Exchange (ACE) Stations were deployed at the Cape Bounty Arctic Watershed Observatory (CBAWO) to quantify the contribution of CO2 exchange from wet sedge vegetation. The wet sedge vegetation type is of specific interest as it is the most productive community type in the High Arctic. These communities are commonly regarded in past studies as carbon sinks during their entire growing season, although the scale and key controls are not completely understood. In addition, warming of the High Arctic enhances wet sedge growth, which may result in an increase of the percentage of land occupied by wet sedge meadows. This in turn has the capability of significantly altering the carbon balance of high Arctic landscapes. The objective of these data files is to determine the CO2 exchange rate in these settings, utilizing the ACE systems. The measurements from each chamber were automatically recorded every 30 minutes from July 3 2015 to August 7 2015. Active layer depth, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil temperature and soil moisture measurements were also collected in conjunction with the net CO2 exchange rate (NCER). The r esults indicate that wet sedge vegetation in this area does represent a carbon sink through photosynthetic processes.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Turner, Kevin;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    These data comprise a suite of water chemistry parameters for 13 - 24 river or creek sites across Old Crow Flats, Yukon, Canada. The sampling record is for 2007 - 2012 (n = 13) and 2015 - 2019 (n = 24). Samples were collected mostly during June and late August/early September for the entire record, and for late July for the early record. Sampling sites span headwaters to high-order channels including the main tributaries (i.e., Johnson Creek, Schaeffer Creek, Blackfox Creek, King Edward Creek, Thomas Creek, Potato Creek) and seven locations along the Old Crow River. Data provide an indication of water chemistry spatial patterns across Old Crow Flats during 2007 - 2019. Ongoing synthesis is being used to identify how these spatial patterns are responding to climate-driven landscape changes.

  • Research data . 2021
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Petrik, Ronny; Geyer, Beate;
    Publisher: World Data Center for Climate (WDCC) at DKRZ

    Project: open feed-in time series based on a Renewable Energy Database - The dataset was produced in the framework of the project openFRED. The data are dedicated to force energy system models, i.e. relevant parameters for wind energy (gust estimates), for solar energy (direct normal irradiation) and hydropower (runoff). The project was founded by Bundesministeriums für Wirtschaft und Energie, FKZ: 0324006B. Summary: This is an atmospheric hindcast for Western Europe and the North Atlantic using COSMO-CLM version 5.0 with spectral nudging from 2002-2017. MERRA2 reanalysis data are used as forcing. Additionally transient and monthly aerosol data of the MACv2 climatology are prescribed. The model uses a rotated grid with 566 x 481 grid points and a grid point distance of 0.0625 degrees, the rotated North pole is located at 162.0 W, 39.25 N. The published data excludes the sponge zone and have 526 x 441 grid points. In rotated coordinates the published simulation data extends from 22.64 W to 10.18 E, 11.2 S to 16.3 N, in geographical coordinates this corresponds to about 12 W to 30 E, 39 N to 60 N. institution: Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Coastal Research, Germany source: int2lm_131101_2.00_clm4, COSMO-CLM5.0_clm14_aerosol_gust (available at DKRZ's LTA WDCC service) contact: http://coastmod.hzg.de originator: Ronny Petrik crs: EPSG:4326

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Hubert , Casey; Noel, Amy; Burt, Alexis; Cramm, Margaret; Kostka, Joel; Montoya, Oscar; Stern, Gary; Sun, Xiaoxu;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Geomicrobiology Methods: Sediment sampling using the box core included bulk surface sediment bags for incubation experiments (mock oil spills) and ethanol-preserved aliquots of sediment for further genomic analysis (DNA sequencing for microbial community composition and biodiversity) at multiple stations. Sediment push cores were sectioned and ethanol-preserved for genomic analysis. Water was collected on board using the CTD-Rosette at multiple stations. At each of the stations, bottom and surface water was collected and filtered on board for future molecular analysis. Mock oil spills consist of small bottles in which artificial seawater is combined with marine sediment and either diesel, bunker fuel or crude oil in different concentrations. Bottles are incubated under either oxic (air in the headspace of the sealed bottles) or anoxic (90:10 N2/CO2 headspace) in the bottles. Incubations are conducted both at 4°C to mimic cold ocean conditions, and at room temperature, which promotes a faster microbial response. Some experiments were set up on board, kept at 4°C, and transported back to Calgary while still incubating in coolers with data loggers to record the incubation temperature. Incubations last from weeks to months, during which time the experiments are subsampled for analysis of the crude oil or fuel composition (via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), oxygen and CO2 in the headspace (via gas chromatography) and sulphate in the aqueous phase (via ion chromatography). DNA extraction uses a modified bead beating approach either using commercial kits from MoBio (PowerSoil) or MP Biomedical (FastDNA Spin Kit) or using an in-house protocol. Using PCR, 16S rRNA genes from bulk environmental DNA extracts are amplified and purified for partial sequencing in the in-house Illumina MiSeq. Samples were made in July and August 2013 at stations 115, 176, 323, 600 and 633. In August and September 2014, stations KANE2B, KEN1, 304, 309, 312, 437, GSC11BC, 435, 407, 405 and 460 were sampled. In 2015, stations QMG3, QMG, 314, CB1 were sampled from August to November.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Fernie, Kim; Elliott, Kyle; Braune, Birgit; Head, Jessica; Letcher, Robert;
    Publisher: Polar Data Catalogue

    Research shows that the exposure of wildlife to chemical pollutants can elicit endocrine disruptive and behavioral effects. Such potential effects may occur in Arctic seabirds that must concurrently deal with rapid environmental changes relating to climate change. Because the endocrine system plays a critical role in allowing animals to respond to environmental stress (e.g., changing ice patterns), endocrine disruption could influence the ability of wildlife to respond to climate change. We are examining such interactions with thick-billed murres (Uria lomvia) that feed from ice flows and breed in Hudson Bay, Canada. Reductions in ice result in the birds spending more energy to obtain less fish that may result in poorer reproductive success and chick development. We sought to determine whether a suite of contaminants that bioaccumulates in this species, and the influence of climate change, have an effect on avian wildlife by limiting their ability to respond to changes in ice availability. In 2016 through 2018, foraging behaviors and movements of > 67 thick-billed murres were tracked each year with GPS-accelerometers, and concentrations of thyroid hormones, corticosterone, total mercury (THg), a suite of flame retardants (FRs), and per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) were measured in the plasma of individuals. Levels of all measured PFASs and FRs were consistently low and unrelated to hormones or behavior. However, THg concentrations were associated with circulating triiodothyronine (T3) prior to foraging. In contrast to a "medium-ice" year (2016), in a "low-ice" year (2017), the relationship between T3 and THg was negative. The T3 concentrations of the birds prior to foraging were associated with their foraging behavior; in contrast to 2016, higher levels of T3 were associated with lower diving rates. We found no associations with plasma corticosterone. GPS tracks demonstrated that birds foraged to the north of the colony during incubation when ice was present, then moved to forage to the northwest as chick-rearing progressed when ice was no longer present. These results suggest that birds were foraging near regions of floating ice, which may improve foraging success and reduce diving rates. Based on our 2016-17 findings, we tentatively conclude that THg may influence the ability of these seabirds to adjust to variation in ice cover, and will further examine our hypothesis with 2018 data collected under different environmental conditions.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Sozialwissenschaftliche Studiengesellschaft;
    Publisher: AUSSDA

    No abstract available

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