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  • Publication . Report . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Szprot, Jakub; Arpagaus, Brigitte; Ciula, Arianna; Clivaz, Claire; Gabay, Simon; Honegger, Matthieu; Hughes, Lorna; Immenhauser, Beat; Jakeman, Neil; Lhotak, Martin; +8 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | DESIR (731081)

    This report provides information about activities and progress towards establishing DARIAH membership in six countries: the Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK, which took place between July and December 2019. Previous activities were described in detail in the D3.2 - Regularly Monitor Country-Specific Progress in Enabling New DARIAH Membership. During the project lifetime, the Czech Republic joined DARIAH ERIC; in other countries, collaboration with DARIAH has been greatly strengthened and significant progress regarding DARIAH membership has been achieved. The report also outlines the next steps in the accession processes, building on the results of the DESIR project.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tahko, Tuuli; Zehavi, Ora; Lhotak, Martin; Romanova, Natasha; Clivaz, Claire; Ros, Salvador; Raciti, Marco;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | Locus Ludi (741520), EC | DESIR (731081)

    The DESIR project sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and firmly establish it as a long-term leader and partner within arts and humanities communities. The project was designed to address six core infrastructural sustainability dimensions and one of these was dedicated to training and education, which is also one of the four pillars identified in the DARIAH Strategic Plan 2019-2026. In the framework of Work Package 7: Teaching, DESIR organised dedicated workshops in the six DARIAH accession countries (Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) to introduce them to the DARIAH infrastructure and related services, and to develop methodological research skills. The topic of each workshop was decided by accession countries representatives according to the training needs of the national communities of researchers in the (Digital) Humanities. Training topics varied greatly: on the one hand, some workshops had the objective to introduce participants to specific methodological research skills; on the other hand, a different approach was used, and some events focused on the infrastructural role of training and education. The workshops organised in the context of Work Package 7: Teaching are listed below:• CZECH REPUBLIC: “A series of fall tutorials 2019 organized by LINDAT/CLARIAHCZ, tutorial #3 on TEI Training”, November 28, 2019, Prague;• FINLAND: “Reuse & sustainability: Open Science and social sciences and humanities research infrastructures”, 23 October 2019, Helsinki;• ISRAEL: “Introduction to Text Encoding and Digital Editions”, 24 October 2019, Haifa;• SPAIN: “DESIR Workshop: Digital Tools, Shared Data, and Research Dissemination”, 3 July 2019, Madrid;• SWITZERLAND: “Sharing the Experience: Workflows for the Digital Humanities”, 5-6 December 2019, Neuchâtel;• UNITED KINGDOM: “Research Software Engineering for Digital Humanities: Role of Training in Sustaining Expertise”, 9 December, London.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claire Clivaz;
    Publisher: De Gruyter

    International audience; This article presents the challenges of developing Humanities research in a digital environment in relation to a New Testament test-case: the MARK16 project. The first section argues that virtual research environments (VREs) have become an excellent milieu in which to develop a digitized research project based on collaborative work. The second section presents an overview of VREs and digital projects on the New Testament. The third section demonstrates the ways in which the MARK16 project participates in the development of VREs and fosters new modes of engaging material in digitized NT research. Preamble The research question of this paper is simultaneously simple and boundless: does it matter if we practice Humanities research in a digital culture rather than in traditional print cultures? And what does the answer to this question mean for New Testament research in particular? Such abyssal questions are fundamental and should at least be considered when a scholar is planning a research project in biblical studies, theology, or religious studies. Indeed, the number of digital research projects are increasing at the international, European, and national levels.1 Such questions closely accompanied the preparatory phase of the SNSF PRIMA grant MARK16, a five-year project supported by the Swiss National Foundation.2 These interrogations are deeply embedded within the opening phase of the project and will remain so throughout, as MARK16 aims to build a new Digital Humanities research model. This will be based on a test case that is well known in New Testament textual criticism (NTTC): the ending of the Gospel according to Mark. Consequently, this article explores the epistemological digital turn in the Humanities and relates it to the MARK16 project, hoping to inspire further research and engagement in NTTC and New Testament studies. The first section outlines some challenges for digital research, pointing to the fact that virtual research environments (VREs) seem to be the main emergent digital milieu in which this work occurs. The second section presents an overview of VREs in New Testament and Early Christian research, and the third discusses the challenges presented by MARK16 in building a new Humanities research model around a NTTC test case.

search
Include:
3 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Publication . Report . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Szprot, Jakub; Arpagaus, Brigitte; Ciula, Arianna; Clivaz, Claire; Gabay, Simon; Honegger, Matthieu; Hughes, Lorna; Immenhauser, Beat; Jakeman, Neil; Lhotak, Martin; +8 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | DESIR (731081)

    This report provides information about activities and progress towards establishing DARIAH membership in six countries: the Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK, which took place between July and December 2019. Previous activities were described in detail in the D3.2 - Regularly Monitor Country-Specific Progress in Enabling New DARIAH Membership. During the project lifetime, the Czech Republic joined DARIAH ERIC; in other countries, collaboration with DARIAH has been greatly strengthened and significant progress regarding DARIAH membership has been achieved. The report also outlines the next steps in the accession processes, building on the results of the DESIR project.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tahko, Tuuli; Zehavi, Ora; Lhotak, Martin; Romanova, Natasha; Clivaz, Claire; Ros, Salvador; Raciti, Marco;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | Locus Ludi (741520), EC | DESIR (731081)

    The DESIR project sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and firmly establish it as a long-term leader and partner within arts and humanities communities. The project was designed to address six core infrastructural sustainability dimensions and one of these was dedicated to training and education, which is also one of the four pillars identified in the DARIAH Strategic Plan 2019-2026. In the framework of Work Package 7: Teaching, DESIR organised dedicated workshops in the six DARIAH accession countries (Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) to introduce them to the DARIAH infrastructure and related services, and to develop methodological research skills. The topic of each workshop was decided by accession countries representatives according to the training needs of the national communities of researchers in the (Digital) Humanities. Training topics varied greatly: on the one hand, some workshops had the objective to introduce participants to specific methodological research skills; on the other hand, a different approach was used, and some events focused on the infrastructural role of training and education. The workshops organised in the context of Work Package 7: Teaching are listed below:• CZECH REPUBLIC: “A series of fall tutorials 2019 organized by LINDAT/CLARIAHCZ, tutorial #3 on TEI Training”, November 28, 2019, Prague;• FINLAND: “Reuse & sustainability: Open Science and social sciences and humanities research infrastructures”, 23 October 2019, Helsinki;• ISRAEL: “Introduction to Text Encoding and Digital Editions”, 24 October 2019, Haifa;• SPAIN: “DESIR Workshop: Digital Tools, Shared Data, and Research Dissemination”, 3 July 2019, Madrid;• SWITZERLAND: “Sharing the Experience: Workflows for the Digital Humanities”, 5-6 December 2019, Neuchâtel;• UNITED KINGDOM: “Research Software Engineering for Digital Humanities: Role of Training in Sustaining Expertise”, 9 December, London.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claire Clivaz;
    Publisher: De Gruyter

    International audience; This article presents the challenges of developing Humanities research in a digital environment in relation to a New Testament test-case: the MARK16 project. The first section argues that virtual research environments (VREs) have become an excellent milieu in which to develop a digitized research project based on collaborative work. The second section presents an overview of VREs and digital projects on the New Testament. The third section demonstrates the ways in which the MARK16 project participates in the development of VREs and fosters new modes of engaging material in digitized NT research. Preamble The research question of this paper is simultaneously simple and boundless: does it matter if we practice Humanities research in a digital culture rather than in traditional print cultures? And what does the answer to this question mean for New Testament research in particular? Such abyssal questions are fundamental and should at least be considered when a scholar is planning a research project in biblical studies, theology, or religious studies. Indeed, the number of digital research projects are increasing at the international, European, and national levels.1 Such questions closely accompanied the preparatory phase of the SNSF PRIMA grant MARK16, a five-year project supported by the Swiss National Foundation.2 These interrogations are deeply embedded within the opening phase of the project and will remain so throughout, as MARK16 aims to build a new Digital Humanities research model. This will be based on a test case that is well known in New Testament textual criticism (NTTC): the ending of the Gospel according to Mark. Consequently, this article explores the epistemological digital turn in the Humanities and relates it to the MARK16 project, hoping to inspire further research and engagement in NTTC and New Testament studies. The first section outlines some challenges for digital research, pointing to the fact that virtual research environments (VREs) seem to be the main emergent digital milieu in which this work occurs. The second section presents an overview of VREs in New Testament and Early Christian research, and the third discusses the challenges presented by MARK16 in building a new Humanities research model around a NTTC test case.

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