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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Adsera, Alicia; Ferrer, Ana;
    Project: SSHRC , CIHR

    This paper contributes to the analysis of the integration of immigrants in the Canadian labour market by focusing in two relatively new dimensions. We combine the large samples of the restricted version of the Canadian Census (1991-2006) with both a novel measure of linguistic proximity of the immigrant’s mother tongue to that of the destination country and with information of the occupational skills embodied in the jobs immigrants hold. This allows us to assess the role that language plays in the labour market performance of immigrants and to better study their career progression relative to the native born. Results show that linguistic proximity shapes the evolution of job-skill content of immigrant jobs over time and in some cases affects patterns of wage assimilation of immigrants.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fangong Kong; Shoujuan Wang; Weijue Gao; Pedram Fatehi;
    Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
    Project: NSERC

    Kraft lignin (KL) produced in kraft pulping process has a low molecular weight and solubility, which limits its application in industry. For the first time, KL was polymerized with acrylic acid (AA) in an acidic aqueous suspension system to produce a water soluble lignin–AA polymer with a high molecular weight in this work. The polymerization reaction was carried out using K2S2O8 as an initiator, and the influence of reaction conditions on the carboxylate group content and molecular weight of resultant lignin polymers was systematically investigated. The mechanism of polymerization of KL and AA was discussed fundamentally. The resulting lignin–AA polymer was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and elemental analyses. The results showed that the phenolic hydroxyl group (Ph-OH) content of KL promoted the polymerization under an acidic environment. Under the conditions of 1.5 wt% of initiator, 3.5 of pH, 10.0 of AA/lignin molar ratio, 0.15 mol L−1 of lignin concentration, 3 h and 80 °C, the carboxylate group content and the molecular weight of the polymer were 7.37 mmol g−1 and 7.4 × 105 g mol−1, respectively. The lignin–AA polymer was water soluble at a 10 g L−1 concentration and a pH higher than 4.5. Furthermore, the flocculation performance of lignin–AA polymer in an aluminium oxide suspension was evaluated. Compared with polyAA, the lignin–AA polymer was a more efficient flocculant for aluminium oxide suspension, which shows its potential to be used as a green flocculant in industry.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Catherine Martel;
    Publisher: Future Science Ltd

    Catherine Martel speaks to Francesca Lake, Managing Commissioning Editor: Catherine Martel obtained her PhD from the Université de Montréal and pursued a postdoctoral fellowship first at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York (NY, USA), then at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA), and obtained the Junior Investigator Award for Women from the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology council of the American Heart Association. Her postdoctoral work is certainly groundbreaking and brings forward new considerations in the field: she discovered that the lymphatic vessel route, the network that runs in parallel with the blood vessels, is critical for removing cholesterol from multiple tissues, including the aortic wall. In 2013, she joined the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Early Career Committee, eager to bring a Canadian perspective to the group and get involved in council activities. Since 2014, she is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Medicine at the Université de Montréal, and a research scientist at the Montreal Heart Institute. Her research program now focuses on characterizing the physiopathologic role of the lymphatics in the initiation, progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Basic and translational research will allow her team to identify the causes of lymphatic dysfunction, and eventually target potential therapeutic strategies aiming at improving lymphatic function at the different levels of the atherothrombotic disease. You can follow her laboratory at @LaboMartel_ICM.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 1997
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Raymond Douville;
    Publisher: Consortium Erudit
    Country: Canada
  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2009 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2009
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    T. J. Davidge;
    Publisher: arXiv

    Wide-field images obtained with the 3.6 meter Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the spatial distribution and photometric properties of the brightest stars in the disk of M81 (NGC 3031). With the exception of the central regions of the galaxy and gaps between CCDs, the survey is spatially complete for stars with i' < 24 and major axis distances of 18 kpc. A more modest near-infrared survey detects stars with K < 20 over roughly one third of the disk. Bright main sequence (MS) stars and RSGs are traced out to galactocentric distances of at least 18 kpc. The spatial distribution of bright MS stars tracks emission at far-ultraviolet, mid- and far-infrared wavelengths, although tidal features contain bright MS stars but have little or no infrared flux. The specific frequency of bright MS stars and RSGs, normalized to K-band integrated brightness, increases with radius, indicating that during the past 30 Myr the specific star formation rate (SSFR) has increased with increasing radius. The stellar content of the M81 disk undergoes a distinct change near R ~ 14 kpc, and the luminosity-weighted mean age decreases with increasing radius in the outer regions of the M81 disk. Accepted for puplication in the ApJ

  • Authors: 
    Marzouk Benali;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
  • Authors: 
    Donald G. Fleming; Mee Shelley; Donald J. Arseneau; Masayoshi Senba; James J. Pan; Emil Roduner;
    Publisher: American Chemical Society (ACS)

    The adsorption and dynamical behavior of the muonated cyclohexadienyl radical (C6H6Mu) in NaY zeolite, formed by muonium (Mu) addition on adsorbed benzene, was investigated by the muon spin resonance (μSR) technique, primarily at loadings of 2−3 C6H6 molecules per supercage of NaY. The dynamics of this radical are expected to be the same as its isotopic analogue, C6H7, for which there are no similar data available. Both TF-μSR and ALC-μSR spectra were recorded, with the most detailed information provided by the positions and line widths of the avoided level crossing resonances. In concert with 2H NMR, neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics studies of the parent benzene molecule, as well as current theoretical calculations, the dominant adsorption site for the C6H6Mu radical is believed to be the SII Na cation, within a supercage, which gives rise to three observed ALC lines, corresponding to two different orientations for the muon (proton) of the CHMu methylene group: pointing toward (endo) and away ...

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vikraman Selvaraja; Marco L. Fiorentini; Crystal LaFlamme; Boswell A. Wing; Thi Hao Bui;
    Publisher: Geological Society of America

    The cycle of sulfur, an important volatile in Earth9s crust, is the driver of many significant processes such as biological evolution, climate change, and the formation of ore deposits. This study investigates the ancient cycle of volatiles by tracing the indelible signal of anomalous sulfur isotopes, expressed as Δ 33 S ≠ 0, to illuminate the pathway of sulfur recycling through magmatic arcs. We selected the ca. 2.0 Ga Glenburgh gold deposit in the Glenburgh magmatic arc of Western Australia as a natural laboratory for this study. High-precision multiple sulfur isotope analyses of samples from the Glenburgh gold deposit and surrounding granitoid rocks yield the largest known sulfur isotope anomalies (Δ 33 S up to +0.82‰) in rocks 2.33 Ga. Multiple sulfur isotope data are able to clarify a process that is cryptic to most other currently available data sets, showing that the cycling of volatiles and metals in arc settings occurs on very large scales, from the atmosphere-hydrosphere through to the lithosphere during crustal generation.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    A. di Biase; Tanner R. Devlin; Maciej S. Kowalski; Jan A. Oleszkiewicz;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: NSERC

    Abstract Three 4 L anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactors (AMBBR) treated brewery wastewater with AC920 media providing 680 m 2 protected surface area per m 3 of media. Different hydraulic retention times (HRT; 24, 18, 12, 10, 8 and 6 h) at 40% media fill and 35 °C, as well as different temperatures (15, 25 and 35 °C) at 50% media fill and 18 h HRT were examined. Best performance at 35 °C and 40% media fill was observed when HRT was 18 h, which corresponded with 92% removal of soluble COD (sCOD). Organic loading rates (OLR) above 24 kg-COD m −3 d −1 decreased performance below 80% sCOD removal at 35 °C and 40% media fill. The reason was confirmed to be that surface area loading rates (SALR) above 50 g-sCOD m −2 d −1 caused excessive biofilm thickness that filled up internal channels of the media, leading to mass transfer limitations. Temperature had a very significant impact on process performance with 50% media fill and 18 h HRT. Biomass concentrations were significantly higher at lower temperatures. At 15 °C the mass of volatile solids (VS) was more than three times higher than at 35 °C for the same OLR. Biofilms acclimated to 25 °C and 15 °C achieved removal of 80% sCOD at SALR of 10 g-sCOD m −2 d −1 and 1.0 g-sCOD m −2 d −1 , respectively. Even though biomass concentrations were higher at lower temperature, biofilm acclimated to 25 °C and 15 °C performed significantly slower than that acclimated to 35 °C.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kurji HM; Ono Y; Nelson AA; More KD; Wong B; Dyke C; Boorman RS; Thornton GM; Lo IK;
    Publisher: Dove Medical Press

    Hafeez M Kurji,1 Yohei Ono,2,3 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Ben Wong,4 Corinne Dyke,4 Richard S Boorman,2 Gail M Thornton,2,5 Ian KY Lo2 1College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopaedic Surgery, McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 5Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Background: Arthroscopic repair of type II superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions is a common surgical procedure. However, anatomic healing following repair has rarely been investigated. The intraobserver and interobserver reliability of magnetic resonance imaging arthrography (MRA) following type II SLAP repair has not previously been investigated. This is of particular interest due to recent reports of poor clinical results following type II SLAP lesion repair. Purpose: To evaluate the MRA findings following arthroscopic type II SLAP lesion repair and determine its intraobserver and interobserver reliability. Study design: Cohort study (diagnosis), Level of Evidence, 2. Methods: Twenty-five patients with an isolated type II SLAP lesion (confirmed via diagnostic arthroscopy) underwent standard suture anchor-based repair. At a mean of 25.2 months postoperatively, patients underwent a standardized MRA protocol to investigate the integrity of the repair. MRAs were independently reviewed by two radiologists and a fellowship trained shoulder surgeon. The outcomes were classified as healed SLAP repair or re-torn SLAP repair. Results: On average, 54% of MRAs were interpreted as healed SLAP repairs while 46% of MRAs were interpreted as having a re-torn SLAP repair. Overall, only 43% of the studies had 100% agreement across all interpretations. The intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.71 to 0.81 while the interobserver reliability between readers ranged from 0.13 to 0.44 (Table 1). Conclusion: The intraobserver agreement of MRA in the evaluation of type II SLAP repair was substantial to excellent. However, the interobserver agreement of MRA was poor to fair. As a result, the routine use of MRA in the evaluation of type II SLAP lesion repair should be utilized with caution. A global evaluation of the patient, including detailed history and physical examination, is paramount in determining the cause of failure and one should not rely on MRA alone. Keywords: SLAP, MRA, labrum, postoperative

search
Include:
2,526,161 Research products, page 1 of 252,617
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Adsera, Alicia; Ferrer, Ana;
    Project: SSHRC , CIHR

    This paper contributes to the analysis of the integration of immigrants in the Canadian labour market by focusing in two relatively new dimensions. We combine the large samples of the restricted version of the Canadian Census (1991-2006) with both a novel measure of linguistic proximity of the immigrant’s mother tongue to that of the destination country and with information of the occupational skills embodied in the jobs immigrants hold. This allows us to assess the role that language plays in the labour market performance of immigrants and to better study their career progression relative to the native born. Results show that linguistic proximity shapes the evolution of job-skill content of immigrant jobs over time and in some cases affects patterns of wage assimilation of immigrants.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Fangong Kong; Shoujuan Wang; Weijue Gao; Pedram Fatehi;
    Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
    Project: NSERC

    Kraft lignin (KL) produced in kraft pulping process has a low molecular weight and solubility, which limits its application in industry. For the first time, KL was polymerized with acrylic acid (AA) in an acidic aqueous suspension system to produce a water soluble lignin–AA polymer with a high molecular weight in this work. The polymerization reaction was carried out using K2S2O8 as an initiator, and the influence of reaction conditions on the carboxylate group content and molecular weight of resultant lignin polymers was systematically investigated. The mechanism of polymerization of KL and AA was discussed fundamentally. The resulting lignin–AA polymer was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) and elemental analyses. The results showed that the phenolic hydroxyl group (Ph-OH) content of KL promoted the polymerization under an acidic environment. Under the conditions of 1.5 wt% of initiator, 3.5 of pH, 10.0 of AA/lignin molar ratio, 0.15 mol L−1 of lignin concentration, 3 h and 80 °C, the carboxylate group content and the molecular weight of the polymer were 7.37 mmol g−1 and 7.4 × 105 g mol−1, respectively. The lignin–AA polymer was water soluble at a 10 g L−1 concentration and a pH higher than 4.5. Furthermore, the flocculation performance of lignin–AA polymer in an aluminium oxide suspension was evaluated. Compared with polyAA, the lignin–AA polymer was a more efficient flocculant for aluminium oxide suspension, which shows its potential to be used as a green flocculant in industry.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Catherine Martel;
    Publisher: Future Science Ltd

    Catherine Martel speaks to Francesca Lake, Managing Commissioning Editor: Catherine Martel obtained her PhD from the Université de Montréal and pursued a postdoctoral fellowship first at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York (NY, USA), then at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA), and obtained the Junior Investigator Award for Women from the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology council of the American Heart Association. Her postdoctoral work is certainly groundbreaking and brings forward new considerations in the field: she discovered that the lymphatic vessel route, the network that runs in parallel with the blood vessels, is critical for removing cholesterol from multiple tissues, including the aortic wall. In 2013, she joined the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology Early Career Committee, eager to bring a Canadian perspective to the group and get involved in council activities. Since 2014, she is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Medicine at the Université de Montréal, and a research scientist at the Montreal Heart Institute. Her research program now focuses on characterizing the physiopathologic role of the lymphatics in the initiation, progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Basic and translational research will allow her team to identify the causes of lymphatic dysfunction, and eventually target potential therapeutic strategies aiming at improving lymphatic function at the different levels of the atherothrombotic disease. You can follow her laboratory at @LaboMartel_ICM.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 1997
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Raymond Douville;
    Publisher: Consortium Erudit
    Country: Canada
  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2009 . Embargo End Date: 01 Jan 2009
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    T. J. Davidge;
    Publisher: arXiv

    Wide-field images obtained with the 3.6 meter Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are used to investigate the spatial distribution and photometric properties of the brightest stars in the disk of M81 (NGC 3031). With the exception of the central regions of the galaxy and gaps between CCDs, the survey is spatially complete for stars with i' < 24 and major axis distances of 18 kpc. A more modest near-infrared survey detects stars with K < 20 over roughly one third of the disk. Bright main sequence (MS) stars and RSGs are traced out to galactocentric distances of at least 18 kpc. The spatial distribution of bright MS stars tracks emission at far-ultraviolet, mid- and far-infrared wavelengths, although tidal features contain bright MS stars but have little or no infrared flux. The specific frequency of bright MS stars and RSGs, normalized to K-band integrated brightness, increases with radius, indicating that during the past 30 Myr the specific star formation rate (SSFR) has increased with increasing radius. The stellar content of the M81 disk undergoes a distinct change near R ~ 14 kpc, and the luminosity-weighted mean age decreases with increasing radius in the outer regions of the M81 disk. Accepted for puplication in the ApJ

  • Authors: 
    Marzouk Benali;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
  • Authors: 
    Donald G. Fleming; Mee Shelley; Donald J. Arseneau; Masayoshi Senba; James J. Pan; Emil Roduner;
    Publisher: American Chemical Society (ACS)

    The adsorption and dynamical behavior of the muonated cyclohexadienyl radical (C6H6Mu) in NaY zeolite, formed by muonium (Mu) addition on adsorbed benzene, was investigated by the muon spin resonance (μSR) technique, primarily at loadings of 2−3 C6H6 molecules per supercage of NaY. The dynamics of this radical are expected to be the same as its isotopic analogue, C6H7, for which there are no similar data available. Both TF-μSR and ALC-μSR spectra were recorded, with the most detailed information provided by the positions and line widths of the avoided level crossing resonances. In concert with 2H NMR, neutron diffraction and molecular dynamics studies of the parent benzene molecule, as well as current theoretical calculations, the dominant adsorption site for the C6H6Mu radical is believed to be the SII Na cation, within a supercage, which gives rise to three observed ALC lines, corresponding to two different orientations for the muon (proton) of the CHMu methylene group: pointing toward (endo) and away ...

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vikraman Selvaraja; Marco L. Fiorentini; Crystal LaFlamme; Boswell A. Wing; Thi Hao Bui;
    Publisher: Geological Society of America

    The cycle of sulfur, an important volatile in Earth9s crust, is the driver of many significant processes such as biological evolution, climate change, and the formation of ore deposits. This study investigates the ancient cycle of volatiles by tracing the indelible signal of anomalous sulfur isotopes, expressed as Δ 33 S ≠ 0, to illuminate the pathway of sulfur recycling through magmatic arcs. We selected the ca. 2.0 Ga Glenburgh gold deposit in the Glenburgh magmatic arc of Western Australia as a natural laboratory for this study. High-precision multiple sulfur isotope analyses of samples from the Glenburgh gold deposit and surrounding granitoid rocks yield the largest known sulfur isotope anomalies (Δ 33 S up to +0.82‰) in rocks 2.33 Ga. Multiple sulfur isotope data are able to clarify a process that is cryptic to most other currently available data sets, showing that the cycling of volatiles and metals in arc settings occurs on very large scales, from the atmosphere-hydrosphere through to the lithosphere during crustal generation.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    A. di Biase; Tanner R. Devlin; Maciej S. Kowalski; Jan A. Oleszkiewicz;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: NSERC

    Abstract Three 4 L anaerobic moving bed biofilm reactors (AMBBR) treated brewery wastewater with AC920 media providing 680 m 2 protected surface area per m 3 of media. Different hydraulic retention times (HRT; 24, 18, 12, 10, 8 and 6 h) at 40% media fill and 35 °C, as well as different temperatures (15, 25 and 35 °C) at 50% media fill and 18 h HRT were examined. Best performance at 35 °C and 40% media fill was observed when HRT was 18 h, which corresponded with 92% removal of soluble COD (sCOD). Organic loading rates (OLR) above 24 kg-COD m −3 d −1 decreased performance below 80% sCOD removal at 35 °C and 40% media fill. The reason was confirmed to be that surface area loading rates (SALR) above 50 g-sCOD m −2 d −1 caused excessive biofilm thickness that filled up internal channels of the media, leading to mass transfer limitations. Temperature had a very significant impact on process performance with 50% media fill and 18 h HRT. Biomass concentrations were significantly higher at lower temperatures. At 15 °C the mass of volatile solids (VS) was more than three times higher than at 35 °C for the same OLR. Biofilms acclimated to 25 °C and 15 °C achieved removal of 80% sCOD at SALR of 10 g-sCOD m −2 d −1 and 1.0 g-sCOD m −2 d −1 , respectively. Even though biomass concentrations were higher at lower temperature, biofilm acclimated to 25 °C and 15 °C performed significantly slower than that acclimated to 35 °C.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kurji HM; Ono Y; Nelson AA; More KD; Wong B; Dyke C; Boorman RS; Thornton GM; Lo IK;
    Publisher: Dove Medical Press

    Hafeez M Kurji,1 Yohei Ono,2,3 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Ben Wong,4 Corinne Dyke,4 Richard S Boorman,2 Gail M Thornton,2,5 Ian KY Lo2 1College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopaedic Surgery, McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; 4Department of Radiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 5Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Background: Arthroscopic repair of type II superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions is a common surgical procedure. However, anatomic healing following repair has rarely been investigated. The intraobserver and interobserver reliability of magnetic resonance imaging arthrography (MRA) following type II SLAP repair has not previously been investigated. This is of particular interest due to recent reports of poor clinical results following type II SLAP lesion repair. Purpose: To evaluate the MRA findings following arthroscopic type II SLAP lesion repair and determine its intraobserver and interobserver reliability. Study design: Cohort study (diagnosis), Level of Evidence, 2. Methods: Twenty-five patients with an isolated type II SLAP lesion (confirmed via diagnostic arthroscopy) underwent standard suture anchor-based repair. At a mean of 25.2 months postoperatively, patients underwent a standardized MRA protocol to investigate the integrity of the repair. MRAs were independently reviewed by two radiologists and a fellowship trained shoulder surgeon. The outcomes were classified as healed SLAP repair or re-torn SLAP repair. Results: On average, 54% of MRAs were interpreted as healed SLAP repairs while 46% of MRAs were interpreted as having a re-torn SLAP repair. Overall, only 43% of the studies had 100% agreement across all interpretations. The intraobserver reliability ranged from 0.71 to 0.81 while the interobserver reliability between readers ranged from 0.13 to 0.44 (Table 1). Conclusion: The intraobserver agreement of MRA in the evaluation of type II SLAP repair was substantial to excellent. However, the interobserver agreement of MRA was poor to fair. As a result, the routine use of MRA in the evaluation of type II SLAP lesion repair should be utilized with caution. A global evaluation of the patient, including detailed history and physical examination, is paramount in determining the cause of failure and one should not rely on MRA alone. Keywords: SLAP, MRA, labrum, postoperative

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