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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abreu, Henso; Araujo Pereira, Rodrigo; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; +1,033 more
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Countries: France, France, Turkey, Poland, Spain, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Denmark, France ...

    A search for a chargino-neutralino pair decaying via the 125 GeV Higgs boson into photons is presented. The study is based on the data collected between 2015 and 2018 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 139 fb(-1) of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. No significant excess over the expected background is observed. Upper limits at 95% confidence level for a massless (chi) over tilde (0)(1) are set on several electroweakino production cross-sections and the visible cross-section for beyond the Standard Model processes. In the context of simplified supersymmetric models, 95% confidence-level limits of up to 310 GeV in m((chi) over tilde (+/-)(1)/(chi) over tilde (0)(2)), where m((chi) over tilde (0)(1)) = 0.5 GeV, are set. Limits at 95% confidence level are also set on the (chi) over tilde (+/-)(1)(chi) over tilde (0)(2) cross-section in the mass plane of m((chi) over tilde (+/-)(1)/(chi) over tilde (0)(2)) and m((chi) over tilde (0)(1)), and on scenarios with gravitino as the lightest supersymmetric particle. Upper limits at the 95% confidence-level are set on the higgsino production cross-section. Higgsino masses below 380 GeV are excluded for the case of the higgsino fully decaying into a Higgs boson and a gravitino. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT) Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Ministry of Education, Youth & Sports - Czech Republic Czech Republic Government Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) Netherlands Government Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT) Departamento Administrativo de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Colciencias Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (CONICYT) National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo (FAPESP) Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada European Union (EU) European Research Council (ERC) National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Ministry of Science and Higher Education, Poland Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology PROMETEO Programme Generalitat Valenciana, Spain Ministry of Energy & Natural Resources - Turkey CERCA Programme Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain Federal Ministry of Education & Research (BMBF) Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (ANAS) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology, China United States Department of Energy (DOE) Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) Danish Natural Science Research Council French National Research Agency (ANR) Herakleitos program - EU-ESF, Greece Slovenian Research Agency - Slovenia Goran Gustafssons Stiftelse, Sweden Greek Ministry of Development-GSRT National Science Foundation (NSF) Aristeia program - EU-ESF, Greece German Research Foundation (DFG) Canada Foundation for Innovation MES of Russia, Russia Federation Thales program - EU-ESF, Greece Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden Canton of Geneva, Switzerland Horizon 2020, European Union Canton of Bern, Switzerland Australian Research Council Austrian Science Fund (FWF) Chinese Academy of Sciences Israel Science Foundation NRC KI, Russia Federation Czech Republic Government Royal Society of London Benoziyo Center, Israel Compute Canada, Canada DST/NRF, South Africa Hong Kong SAR, China COST, European Union CEA-DRF/IRFU, France Greek NSRF, Greece Max Planck Society SERI, Switzerland Leverhulme Trust MNE/IFA, Romania SRNSFG, Georgia BSF-NSF, Israel CANARIE, Canada YerPhI, Armenia MSSR, Slovakia BMWFW, Austria CNRST, Morocco MIZS, Slovenia BCKDF, Canada DNRF, Denmark MESTD, Serbia SSTC, Belarus MINECO, Spain HGF, Germany RCN, Norway NCN, Poland NRC, Canada CRC, Canada SRC, Sweden RGC, China ANPCyT CERN JINR

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Georges Aad; Syed Haider Abidi; Ossama AbouZeid; Henso Abreu; Shunsuke Adachi; Leszek Adamczyk; Jahred Adelman; Michael Adersberger; Tim Adye; Catalin Agheorghiesei; +750 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Italy, Italy, United Kingdom, Portugal, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Germany, Turkey

    We thank CERN for the very successful operation of the LHC, as well as the support staff from our institutions without whom ATLAS could not be operated efficiently. We acknowledge the support of ANPCyT, Argentina; YerPhI, Armenia; ARC, Australia; BMWFW and FWF, Austria; ANAS, Azerbaijan; SSTC, Belarus; CNPq and FAPESP, Brazil; NSERC, NRC and CFI, Canada; CERN; CONICYT, Chile; CAS, MOST and NSFC, China; COLCIENCIAS, Colombia; MSMT CR, MPO CR and VSC CR, Czech Republic; DNRF and DNSRC, Denmark; IN2P3-CNRS, CEA-DRF/IRFU, France; SRNSFG, Georgia; BMBF, HGF, and MPG, Germany; GSRT, Greece; RGC, Hong Kong SAR, China; ISF and Benoziyo Center, Israel; INFN, Italy; MEXT and JSPS, Japan; CNRST, Morocco; NWO, Netherlands; RCN, Norway; MNiSW and NCN, Poland; FCT, Portugal; MNE/IFA, Romania; MES of Russia and NRC KI, Russian Federation; JINR; MESTD, Serbia; MSSR, Slovakia; ARRS and MIZS, Slovenia; DST/NRF, South Africa; MINECO, Spain; SRC and Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden; SERI, SNSF and Cantons of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland; MOST, Taiwan; TAEK, Turkey; STFC, United Kingdom; DOE and NSF, United States of America. In addition, individual groups and members have received support from BCKDF, CANARIE, CRC and Compute Canada, Canada; COST, ERC, ERDF, Horizon 2020, and Marie Sklodowska-Curie Actions, European Union; Investissements d' Avenir Labex and Idex, ANR, France; DFG and AvH Foundation, Germany; Herakleitos, Thales and Aristeia programmes co-financed by EU-ESF and the Greek NSRF, Greece; BSF-NSF and GIF, Israel; CERCA Programme Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain; The Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust, United Kingdom. The crucial computing support from all WLCG partners is acknowledged gratefully, in particular from CERN, the ATLAS Tier-1 facilities at TRIUMF (Canada), NDGF(Denmark, Norway, Sweden), CC-IN2P3 (France), KIT/GridKA (Germany), INFN-CNAF (Italy), NL-T1 (Netherlands), PIC (Spain), ASGC (Taiwan), RAL (UK) and BNL (USA), the Tier-2 facilities worldwide and large non-WLCG resource providers. Major contributors of comp Measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy in lead–lead collisions at sNN−−−√ = 5.02 TeV are presented using a data sample corresponding to 0.49 nb−1 integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2015. The recorded minimum-bias sample is enhanced by triggers for “ultra-central” collisions, providing an opportunity to perform detailed study of flow harmonics in the regime where the initial state is dominated by fluctuations. The anisotropy of the charged-particle azimuthal angle distributions is characterized by the Fourier coefficients, v2–v7, which are measured using the two-particle correlation, scalar-product and event-plane methods. The goal of the paper is to provide measurements of the differential as well as integrated flow harmonics vn over wide ranges of the transverse momentum, 0.5

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aaboud, Morad; Aad, Georges; Abreu, Henso; Armstrong, Alexander III; Hadef, Asma; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; +190 more
    Countries: Spain, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, United Kingdom, Italy
    Project: EC | DARKJETS (679305)

    The response of the ATLAS detector to large-radius jets is measured in situ using 36.2 fb$^{-1}$ of $\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV proton-proton collisions provided by the LHC and recorded by the ATLAS experiment during 2015 and 2016. The jet energy scale is measured in events where the jet recoils against a reference object, which can be either a calibrated photon, a reconstructed $Z$ boson, or a system of well-measured small-radius jets. The jet energy resolution and a calibration of forward jets are derived using dijet balance measurements. The jet mass response is measured with two methods: using mass peaks formed by $W$ bosons and top quarks with large transverse momenta and by comparing the jet mass measured using the energy deposited in the calorimeter with that using the momenta of charged-particle tracks. The transverse momentum and mass responses in simulations are found to be about 2-3% higher than in data. This difference is adjusted for with a correction factor. The results of the different methods are combined to yield a calibration over a large range of transverse momenta ($p_{\rm T}$). The precision of the relative jet energy scale is 1-2% for $200~{\rm GeV} < p_{\rm T} < 2~{\rm TeV}$, while that of the mass scale is 2-10%. The ratio of the energy resolutions in data and simulation is measured to a precision of 10-15% over the same $p_{\rm T}$ range. 70 pages in total, author list starting page 54, 32 figures, 5 tables, final version published in EPJC. All figures including auxiliary figures are available at https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/JETM-2018-02/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew J. L. Harris; Alexander Belousov; Sonia Calvari; Hugo Delgado-Granados; Matthias Hort; Kenneth T. Koga; Estuning Tyas Wulan Mei; Agung Harijoko; José Pacheco; Jean-Marie Prival; +4 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom, France, France, France, France

    International audience; When teaching at a non-English language university, we often argue that because English is the international language, students need to become familiar with English terms, even if the bulk of the class is in the native language. However, to make the meaning of the terms clear, a translation into the native language is always useful. Correct translation of terminology is even more crucial for emergency managers and decision makers who can be confronted with a confusing and inconsistently applied mix of terminology. Thus, it is imperative to have a translation that appropriately converts the meaning of a term, while being grammatically and lexicologically correct, before the need for use. If terms are not consistently defined across all languages following industry standards and norms, what one person believes to be a dog, to another is a cat. However, definitions and translations of English scientific and technical terms are not always available, and language is constantly evolving. We live and work in an international world where English is the common language of multi-cultural exchange. As a result, while finding the correct translation can be difficult because we are too used to the English language terms, translated equivalents that are available may not have been through the peer review process. We have explored this issue by discussing grammatically and lexicologically correct French, German, Icelandic, Indonesian, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Japanese versions for terms involved in communicating effusive eruption intensity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    A.G. Wrobel; Zuzana Kadlecova; Jan Kamenicky; Ji-Chun Yang; Torsten Herrmann; Bernard T. Kelly; Airlie J. McCoy; Philip R. Evans; Stephen R. Martin; Stefan Müller; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Infection and Immunity (097040), WT , EC | CME-REG (330268), WT | Structural Cell Biology o... (090909)

    Summary Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is key to maintaining the transmembrane protein composition of cells’ limiting membranes. During mammalian CME, a reversible phosphorylation event occurs on Thr156 of the μ2 subunit of the main endocytic clathrin adaptor, AP2. We show that this phosphorylation event starts during clathrin-coated pit (CCP) initiation and increases throughout CCP lifetime. μ2Thr156 phosphorylation favors a new, cargo-bound conformation of AP2 and simultaneously creates a binding platform for the endocytic NECAP proteins but without significantly altering AP2’s cargo affinity in vitro. We describe the structural bases of both. NECAP arrival at CCPs parallels that of clathrin and increases with μ2Thr156 phosphorylation. In turn, NECAP recruits drivers of late stages of CCP formation, including SNX9, via a site distinct from where NECAP binds AP2. Disruption of the different modules of this phosphorylation-based temporal regulatory system results in CCP maturation being delayed and/or stalled, hence impairing global rates of CME. Highlights • AP2 μ2T156 phosphorylation starts early at CCP inception and increases as CCP grows • Phosphorylation favors an AP2 conformational change and also triggers NECAP binding • NECAP PHear simultaneously binds P-AP2 and membrane-remodeling proteins on opposite faces • Disrupting the P-AP2:NECAP:membrane-remodeling protein network reduces CME rates Wrobel et al. show that phosphorylation of the mammalian endocytic AP2 adaptor causes a conformational change that allows it to efficiently bind the protein NECAP. This, in turn, recruits membrane-remodeling proteins into clathrin-coated pits, which drive their formation toward final scission from the parent membrane. Graphical Abstract

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maud Miguet; Kristine Beaulieu; Alicia Fillon; Marwa Khammassi; Julie Masurier; Céline Lambert; Martine Duclos; Yves Boirie; Graham Finlayson; David Thivel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom

    International audience; Background: While multidisciplinary weight loss (WL) programs have been suggested to improve the sensitivity of appetite control system, this study examined for the first time the effect of a specific multidisciplinary intervention on the hedonic aspects of food intake in adolescents with obesity.Study design: Twenty-four adolescents (11-15 years) with obesity (mean BMI: 35.7 ± 4.5 kg/m2; BMI percentile: 98.7 ± 0.5) took part in a 10-month inpatient WL program, which included physical activity, nutritional education and psychological support. Height, weight, body composition, food reward (pre- and post-meal), ad libitum energy intake, appetite sensations and eating behavior traits were assessed at baseline, 5 months and at the end of the 10-month intervention. Analyses were conducted with linear mixed models and paired t-tests.Results: The mean WL was 8.9 ± 6.9 kg. Appetite sensations and pre-meal hedonic ratings of liking for all food categories (HF: high-fat; LF: low-fat; SA: savory; SW: sweet) increased after 5 months (fasting hunger, p = 0.02; fasting desire to eat, p = 0.01; daily hunger, p = 0.001; pre-meal liking for HFSA, p = 0.03; LFSA, p = 0.04; HFSW, p = 0.009; LFSW, p = 0.005). In contrast, appetite sensations (fasting and daily), emotional eating (p < 0.001), uncontrolled eating (p = 0.009), and pre-meal explicit liking (for all food categories) decreased between months 5 and 10. Post-meal liking for HFSA (p < 0.001), LFSA (p = 0.002), HFSW (p = 0.02) and LFSW (p < 0.001) decreased between baseline and month 5 and remained unchanged between months 5 and 10.Conclusion: These findings suggest that adaptive mechanisms to WL occurring in the short-to-medium term are attenuated in the longer term with the persistence of WL. These results indicate improvements in the reward response to food in adolescents with obesity and may contribute to the beneficial effect of multicomponent WL interventions in this population. Future studies are required to confirm these findings and elucidate underlying mechanisms.; Adolescents; Energy intake; Food reward; Multidisciplinary intervention; Pediatric obesity; Weight loss.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Flora Camps Bres; Christine Guérard-Hélaine; Virgil Hélaine; Carlos A. F. Fernandes; Israel Sánchez-Moreno; Mounir Traïkia; Eduardo García-Junceda; Marielle Lemaire;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain

    One-pot multistep stereoselective cascade reactions were implemented for the straightforward synthe-sis of various nitrocyclitols. Two kinases, an aldolase and a phosphatase were involved in this process,together with a spontaneous intramolecular Henry reaction to provide the nitrocyclitol moiety. The C Cbond formation catalysed by the aldolase and the nitroaldol reactions were key steps to build the carbocy-cle stereoselectively. The aldolase acceptor substrates were all 4-nitrobutanal structurally based, eitherhydroxylated or unsubstituted at the C2 and/or C3 positions. l-Fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase (FucA)catalysed the formation of the expected (R,R)- or d-erythro aldol, except in the case of 4-nitrobutanal,from which the epimeric (R,S)- or l-threo aldol was also formed. l-Rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase con-sistently formed the expected (R,S)- or l-threo aldol together with a minor amount of (R,R)- or d-erythroaldol. The intramolecular Henry reaction was also found to be stereoselective, occurring spontaneouslyonce the aldol was formed due to the presence of both ketone and a terminally positioned nitro group.The combination of this set of reactions successfully furnished 11 nitrocyclitols which have not beendescribed previously in the literature. CNRS International Relationship service is thanked for mobilityfinancial support to F. Camps Bres. This work was also supportedin part, by the CNRS GDR RDR2 “Aller vers une chimie éco-compatible” Grant (to F.C.B.). E G-J. has been supported by theSpanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (Grants PI11/01436 andCTQ2010-19073/BQU). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ari Asmi; Alfred Wiedensohler; Paolo Laj; A. M. Fjaeraa; Karine Sellegri; Wolfram Birmili; Ernest Weingartner; Urs Baltensperger; V. Zdimal; Nadezda Zikova; +27 more
    Countries: France, Norway, Ireland, Netherlands
    Project: EC | ATMNUCLE (227463)

    Two years of harmonized aerosol number size distribution data from 24 European field monitoring sites have been analysed. The results give a comprehensive overview of the European near surface aerosol particle number concentrations and number size distributions between 30 and 500 nm of dry particle diameter. Spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols in the particle sizes most important for climate applications are presented. We also analyse the annual, weekly and diurnal cycles of the aerosol number concentrations, provide log-normal fitting parameters for median number size distributions, and give guidance notes for data users. Emphasis is placed on the usability of results within the aerosol modelling community. <br></br> We also show that the aerosol number concentrations of Aitken and accumulation mode particles (with 100 nm dry diameter as a cut-off between modes) are related, although there is significant variation in the ratios of the modal number concentrations. Different aerosol and station types are distinguished from this data and this methodology has potential for further categorization of stations aerosol number size distribution types. <br></br> The European submicron aerosol was divided into characteristic types: Central European aerosol, characterized by single mode median size distributions, unimodal number concentration histograms and low variability in CCN-sized aerosol number concentrations; Nordic aerosol with low number concentrations, although showing pronounced seasonal variation of especially Aitken mode particles; Mountain sites (altitude over 1000 m a.s.l.) with a strong seasonal cycle in aerosol number concentrations, high variability, and very low median number concentrations. Southern and Western European regions had fewer stations, which decreases the regional coverage of these results. Aerosol number concentrations over the Britain and Ireland had very high variance and there are indications of mixed air masses from several source regions; the Mediterranean aerosol exhibit high seasonality, and a strong accumulation mode in the summer. The greatest concentrations were observed at the Ispra station in Northern Italy with high accumulation mode number concentrations in the winter. The aerosol number concentrations at the Arctic station Zeppelin in Ny-AA lesund in Svalbard have also a strong seasonal cycle, with greater concentrations of accumulation mode particles in winter, and dominating summer Aitken mode indicating more recently formed particles. Observed particles did not show any statistically significant regional work-week or weekday related variation in number concentrations studied. <br></br> Analysis products are made for open-access to the research community, available in a freely accessible internet site. The results give to the modelling community a reliable, easy-to-use and freely available comparison dataset of aerosol size distributions.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Drevet, Joël,; Gharagozloo, P.; Gutierrez-Adán, A.; Champroux, A.; Noblanc, A.; Kocer, A.; Calle, A.; Pérez-Cerezales, S.; Pericuesta, E.; Polhemus, A.; +3 more
    Countries: Spain, France

    STUDY QUESTION Does a novel antioxidant formulation designed to restore redox balance within the male reproductive tract, reduce sperm DNA damage and increase pregnancy rates in mouse models of sperm oxidative stress? SUMMARY ANSWER Oral administration of a novel antioxidant formulation significantly reduced sperm DNA damage in glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPX5), knockout mice and restored pregnancy rates to near-normal levels in mice subjected to scrotal heat stress. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Animal and human studies have documented the adverse effect of sperm DNA damage on fertilization rates, embryo quality, miscarriage rates and the transfer of de novo mutations to offspring. Semen samples of infertile men are known to be deficient in several key antioxidants relative to their fertile counterparts. Antioxidants alone or in combination have demonstrated limited efficacy against sperm oxidative stress and DNA damage in numerous human clinical trials, however these studies have not been definitive and an optimum combination has remained elusive. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The efficacy of the antioxidant formulation was evaluated in two well-established mouse models of oxidative stress, scrotal heating and Gpx5 knockout (KO) mice, (n = 12 per experimental group), by two independent laboratories. Mice were provided the antioxidant product in their drinking water for 2-8 weeks and compared with control groups for sperm DNA damage and pregnancy rates. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS In the Gpx5 KO model, oxidative DNA damage was monitored in spermatozoa by immunocytochemical detection of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). In the scrotal heat stress model, male fertility was tested by partnering with three females for 5 days. The percentage of pregnant females, number of vaginal plugs, resorptions per litter, and litter size were recorded. MAIN RESULTS AND ROLE OF CHANCE Using immunocytochemical detection of 8OHdG as a biomarker of DNA oxidation, analysis of control mice revealed that around 30% of the sperm population was positively stained. This level increased to about 60% in transgenic mice deficient in the antioxidant enzyme, GPX5. Our results indicate that an 8 week pretreatment of Gpx5 KO mice with the antioxidant formulation provided complete protection of sperm DNA against oxidative damage. In mouse models of scrotal heat stress, only 35% (19/54) of female mice became pregnant resulting in 169 fetuses with 18% fetal resorption (30/169). This is in contrast to the antioxidant pretreated group where 74% (42/57) of female mice became pregnant, resulting in 427 fetuses with 9% fetal resorption (38/427). In both animal models the protection provided by the novel antioxidant was statistically significant (P < 0.01 for the reduction of 8OHdG in the spermatozoa of Gpx5 KO mice and P < 0.05 for increase in fertility in the scrotal heat stress model). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION It was not possible to determine the exact level of antioxidant consumption for each mouse during the treatment period. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Recent clinical studies confirm moderate to severe sperm DNA damage in about 60% of all men visiting IVF centers and in about 80% of men diagnosed with idiopathic male infertility. Our results, if confirmed in humans, will impact clinical fertility practice because they support the concept of using an efficacious antioxidant supplementation as a preconception therapy, in order to optimize fertilization rates, help to maintain a healthy pregnancy and limit the mutational load carried by children. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) The study was funded by the Clermont Universite and the University of Madrid. P.G. is the Managing Director of CellOxess LLC, which has a commercial interest in the detection and resolution of oxidative stress. A.M.;A.P. are employees of CellOxess, LLC. J.R.D.;A.G.-A.;R.J.A. are honorary members of the CellOxess advisory board. © 2016 The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction a d Embryology. All rights reserved.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fatima Cardoso; Stella Kyriakides; S. Ohno; Frédérique Penault-Llorca; Philip Poortmans; Isabel T. Rubio; Sophia Zackrisson; Elżbieta Senkus;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience

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Include:
3,340 Research products, page 1 of 334
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abreu, Henso; Araujo Pereira, Rodrigo; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; +1,033 more
    Publisher: SpringerOpen
    Countries: France, France, Turkey, Poland, Spain, Germany, Italy, Portugal, Denmark, France ...

    A search for a chargino-neutralino pair decaying via the 125 GeV Higgs boson into photons is presented. The study is based on the data collected between 2015 and 2018 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 139 fb(-1) of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. No significant excess over the expected background is observed. Upper limits at 95% confidence level for a massless (chi) over tilde (0)(1) are set on several electroweakino production cross-sections and the visible cross-section for beyond the Standard Model processes. In the context of simplified supersymmetric models, 95% confidence-level limits of up to 310 GeV in m((chi) over tilde (+/-)(1)/(chi) over tilde (0)(2)), where m((chi) over tilde (0)(1)) = 0.5 GeV, are set. Limits at 95% confidence level are also set on the (chi) over tilde (+/-)(1)(chi) over tilde (0)(2) cross-section in the mass plane of m((chi) over tilde (+/-)(1)/(chi) over tilde (0)(2)) and m((chi) over tilde (0)(1)), and on scenarios with gravitino as the lightest supersymmetric particle. Upper limits at the 95% confidence-level are set on the higgsino production cross-section. Higgsino masses below 380 GeV are excluded for the case of the higgsino fully decaying into a Higgs boson and a gravitino. Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT) Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Ministry of Education, Youth & Sports - Czech Republic Czech Republic Government Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) Netherlands Government Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT) Departamento Administrativo de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Colciencias Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica (CONICYT) National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Development Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo (FAPESP) Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada European Union (EU) European Research Council (ERC) National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Ministry of Science and Higher Education, Poland Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology PROMETEO Programme Generalitat Valenciana, Spain Ministry of Energy & Natural Resources - Turkey CERCA Programme Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain Federal Ministry of Education & Research (BMBF) Science & Technology Facilities Council (STFC) Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences (ANAS) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology, China United States Department of Energy (DOE) Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) Danish Natural Science Research Council French National Research Agency (ANR) Herakleitos program - EU-ESF, Greece Slovenian Research Agency - Slovenia Goran Gustafssons Stiftelse, Sweden Greek Ministry of Development-GSRT National Science Foundation (NSF) Aristeia program - EU-ESF, Greece German Research Foundation (DFG) Canada Foundation for Innovation MES of Russia, Russia Federation Thales program - EU-ESF, Greece Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden Canton of Geneva, Switzerland Horizon 2020, European Union Canton of Bern, Switzerland Australian Research Council Austrian Science Fund (FWF) Chinese Academy of Sciences Israel Science Foundation NRC KI, Russia Federation Czech Republic Government Royal Society of London Benoziyo Center, Israel Compute Canada, Canada DST/NRF, South Africa Hong Kong SAR, China COST, European Union CEA-DRF/IRFU, France Greek NSRF, Greece Max Planck Society SERI, Switzerland Leverhulme Trust MNE/IFA, Romania SRNSFG, Georgia BSF-NSF, Israel CANARIE, Canada YerPhI, Armenia MSSR, Slovakia BMWFW, Austria CNRST, Morocco MIZS, Slovenia BCKDF, Canada DNRF, Denmark MESTD, Serbia SSTC, Belarus MINECO, Spain HGF, Germany RCN, Norway NCN, Poland NRC, Canada CRC, Canada SRC, Sweden RGC, China ANPCyT CERN JINR

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Georges Aad; Syed Haider Abidi; Ossama AbouZeid; Henso Abreu; Shunsuke Adachi; Leszek Adamczyk; Jahred Adelman; Michael Adersberger; Tim Adye; Catalin Agheorghiesei; +750 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Italy, Italy, United Kingdom, Portugal, Denmark, Poland, Portugal, Germany, Turkey

    We thank CERN for the very successful operation of the LHC, as well as the support staff from our institutions without whom ATLAS could not be operated efficiently. We acknowledge the support of ANPCyT, Argentina; YerPhI, Armenia; ARC, Australia; BMWFW and FWF, Austria; ANAS, Azerbaijan; SSTC, Belarus; CNPq and FAPESP, Brazil; NSERC, NRC and CFI, Canada; CERN; CONICYT, Chile; CAS, MOST and NSFC, China; COLCIENCIAS, Colombia; MSMT CR, MPO CR and VSC CR, Czech Republic; DNRF and DNSRC, Denmark; IN2P3-CNRS, CEA-DRF/IRFU, France; SRNSFG, Georgia; BMBF, HGF, and MPG, Germany; GSRT, Greece; RGC, Hong Kong SAR, China; ISF and Benoziyo Center, Israel; INFN, Italy; MEXT and JSPS, Japan; CNRST, Morocco; NWO, Netherlands; RCN, Norway; MNiSW and NCN, Poland; FCT, Portugal; MNE/IFA, Romania; MES of Russia and NRC KI, Russian Federation; JINR; MESTD, Serbia; MSSR, Slovakia; ARRS and MIZS, Slovenia; DST/NRF, South Africa; MINECO, Spain; SRC and Wallenberg Foundation, Sweden; SERI, SNSF and Cantons of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland; MOST, Taiwan; TAEK, Turkey; STFC, United Kingdom; DOE and NSF, United States of America. In addition, individual groups and members have received support from BCKDF, CANARIE, CRC and Compute Canada, Canada; COST, ERC, ERDF, Horizon 2020, and Marie Sklodowska-Curie Actions, European Union; Investissements d' Avenir Labex and Idex, ANR, France; DFG and AvH Foundation, Germany; Herakleitos, Thales and Aristeia programmes co-financed by EU-ESF and the Greek NSRF, Greece; BSF-NSF and GIF, Israel; CERCA Programme Generalitat de Catalunya, Spain; The Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust, United Kingdom. The crucial computing support from all WLCG partners is acknowledged gratefully, in particular from CERN, the ATLAS Tier-1 facilities at TRIUMF (Canada), NDGF(Denmark, Norway, Sweden), CC-IN2P3 (France), KIT/GridKA (Germany), INFN-CNAF (Italy), NL-T1 (Netherlands), PIC (Spain), ASGC (Taiwan), RAL (UK) and BNL (USA), the Tier-2 facilities worldwide and large non-WLCG resource providers. Major contributors of comp Measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy in lead–lead collisions at sNN−−−√ = 5.02 TeV are presented using a data sample corresponding to 0.49 nb−1 integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2015. The recorded minimum-bias sample is enhanced by triggers for “ultra-central” collisions, providing an opportunity to perform detailed study of flow harmonics in the regime where the initial state is dominated by fluctuations. The anisotropy of the charged-particle azimuthal angle distributions is characterized by the Fourier coefficients, v2–v7, which are measured using the two-particle correlation, scalar-product and event-plane methods. The goal of the paper is to provide measurements of the differential as well as integrated flow harmonics vn over wide ranges of the transverse momentum, 0.5

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aaboud, Morad; Aad, Georges; Abreu, Henso; Armstrong, Alexander III; Hadef, Asma; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hagihara, Mutsuto; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; +190 more
    Countries: Spain, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, United Kingdom, Italy
    Project: EC | DARKJETS (679305)

    The response of the ATLAS detector to large-radius jets is measured in situ using 36.2 fb$^{-1}$ of $\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV proton-proton collisions provided by the LHC and recorded by the ATLAS experiment during 2015 and 2016. The jet energy scale is measured in events where the jet recoils against a reference object, which can be either a calibrated photon, a reconstructed $Z$ boson, or a system of well-measured small-radius jets. The jet energy resolution and a calibration of forward jets are derived using dijet balance measurements. The jet mass response is measured with two methods: using mass peaks formed by $W$ bosons and top quarks with large transverse momenta and by comparing the jet mass measured using the energy deposited in the calorimeter with that using the momenta of charged-particle tracks. The transverse momentum and mass responses in simulations are found to be about 2-3% higher than in data. This difference is adjusted for with a correction factor. The results of the different methods are combined to yield a calibration over a large range of transverse momenta ($p_{\rm T}$). The precision of the relative jet energy scale is 1-2% for $200~{\rm GeV} < p_{\rm T} < 2~{\rm TeV}$, while that of the mass scale is 2-10%. The ratio of the energy resolutions in data and simulation is measured to a precision of 10-15% over the same $p_{\rm T}$ range. 70 pages in total, author list starting page 54, 32 figures, 5 tables, final version published in EPJC. All figures including auxiliary figures are available at https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/JETM-2018-02/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Andrew J. L. Harris; Alexander Belousov; Sonia Calvari; Hugo Delgado-Granados; Matthias Hort; Kenneth T. Koga; Estuning Tyas Wulan Mei; Agung Harijoko; José Pacheco; Jean-Marie Prival; +4 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom, France, France, France, France

    International audience; When teaching at a non-English language university, we often argue that because English is the international language, students need to become familiar with English terms, even if the bulk of the class is in the native language. However, to make the meaning of the terms clear, a translation into the native language is always useful. Correct translation of terminology is even more crucial for emergency managers and decision makers who can be confronted with a confusing and inconsistently applied mix of terminology. Thus, it is imperative to have a translation that appropriately converts the meaning of a term, while being grammatically and lexicologically correct, before the need for use. If terms are not consistently defined across all languages following industry standards and norms, what one person believes to be a dog, to another is a cat. However, definitions and translations of English scientific and technical terms are not always available, and language is constantly evolving. We live and work in an international world where English is the common language of multi-cultural exchange. As a result, while finding the correct translation can be difficult because we are too used to the English language terms, translated equivalents that are available may not have been through the peer review process. We have explored this issue by discussing grammatically and lexicologically correct French, German, Icelandic, Indonesian, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Japanese versions for terms involved in communicating effusive eruption intensity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    A.G. Wrobel; Zuzana Kadlecova; Jan Kamenicky; Ji-Chun Yang; Torsten Herrmann; Bernard T. Kelly; Airlie J. McCoy; Philip R. Evans; Stephen R. Martin; Stefan Müller; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom
    Project: WT | Infection and Immunity (097040), WT , EC | CME-REG (330268), WT | Structural Cell Biology o... (090909)

    Summary Clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) is key to maintaining the transmembrane protein composition of cells’ limiting membranes. During mammalian CME, a reversible phosphorylation event occurs on Thr156 of the μ2 subunit of the main endocytic clathrin adaptor, AP2. We show that this phosphorylation event starts during clathrin-coated pit (CCP) initiation and increases throughout CCP lifetime. μ2Thr156 phosphorylation favors a new, cargo-bound conformation of AP2 and simultaneously creates a binding platform for the endocytic NECAP proteins but without significantly altering AP2’s cargo affinity in vitro. We describe the structural bases of both. NECAP arrival at CCPs parallels that of clathrin and increases with μ2Thr156 phosphorylation. In turn, NECAP recruits drivers of late stages of CCP formation, including SNX9, via a site distinct from where NECAP binds AP2. Disruption of the different modules of this phosphorylation-based temporal regulatory system results in CCP maturation being delayed and/or stalled, hence impairing global rates of CME. Highlights • AP2 μ2T156 phosphorylation starts early at CCP inception and increases as CCP grows • Phosphorylation favors an AP2 conformational change and also triggers NECAP binding • NECAP PHear simultaneously binds P-AP2 and membrane-remodeling proteins on opposite faces • Disrupting the P-AP2:NECAP:membrane-remodeling protein network reduces CME rates Wrobel et al. show that phosphorylation of the mammalian endocytic AP2 adaptor causes a conformational change that allows it to efficiently bind the protein NECAP. This, in turn, recruits membrane-remodeling proteins into clathrin-coated pits, which drive their formation toward final scission from the parent membrane. Graphical Abstract

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Maud Miguet; Kristine Beaulieu; Alicia Fillon; Marwa Khammassi; Julie Masurier; Céline Lambert; Martine Duclos; Yves Boirie; Graham Finlayson; David Thivel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, United Kingdom

    International audience; Background: While multidisciplinary weight loss (WL) programs have been suggested to improve the sensitivity of appetite control system, this study examined for the first time the effect of a specific multidisciplinary intervention on the hedonic aspects of food intake in adolescents with obesity.Study design: Twenty-four adolescents (11-15 years) with obesity (mean BMI: 35.7 ± 4.5 kg/m2; BMI percentile: 98.7 ± 0.5) took part in a 10-month inpatient WL program, which included physical activity, nutritional education and psychological support. Height, weight, body composition, food reward (pre- and post-meal), ad libitum energy intake, appetite sensations and eating behavior traits were assessed at baseline, 5 months and at the end of the 10-month intervention. Analyses were conducted with linear mixed models and paired t-tests.Results: The mean WL was 8.9 ± 6.9 kg. Appetite sensations and pre-meal hedonic ratings of liking for all food categories (HF: high-fat; LF: low-fat; SA: savory; SW: sweet) increased after 5 months (fasting hunger, p = 0.02; fasting desire to eat, p = 0.01; daily hunger, p = 0.001; pre-meal liking for HFSA, p = 0.03; LFSA, p = 0.04; HFSW, p = 0.009; LFSW, p = 0.005). In contrast, appetite sensations (fasting and daily), emotional eating (p < 0.001), uncontrolled eating (p = 0.009), and pre-meal explicit liking (for all food categories) decreased between months 5 and 10. Post-meal liking for HFSA (p < 0.001), LFSA (p = 0.002), HFSW (p = 0.02) and LFSW (p < 0.001) decreased between baseline and month 5 and remained unchanged between months 5 and 10.Conclusion: These findings suggest that adaptive mechanisms to WL occurring in the short-to-medium term are attenuated in the longer term with the persistence of WL. These results indicate improvements in the reward response to food in adolescents with obesity and may contribute to the beneficial effect of multicomponent WL interventions in this population. Future studies are required to confirm these findings and elucidate underlying mechanisms.; Adolescents; Energy intake; Food reward; Multidisciplinary intervention; Pediatric obesity; Weight loss.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Flora Camps Bres; Christine Guérard-Hélaine; Virgil Hélaine; Carlos A. F. Fernandes; Israel Sánchez-Moreno; Mounir Traïkia; Eduardo García-Junceda; Marielle Lemaire;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain

    One-pot multistep stereoselective cascade reactions were implemented for the straightforward synthe-sis of various nitrocyclitols. Two kinases, an aldolase and a phosphatase were involved in this process,together with a spontaneous intramolecular Henry reaction to provide the nitrocyclitol moiety. The C Cbond formation catalysed by the aldolase and the nitroaldol reactions were key steps to build the carbocy-cle stereoselectively. The aldolase acceptor substrates were all 4-nitrobutanal structurally based, eitherhydroxylated or unsubstituted at the C2 and/or C3 positions. l-Fuculose-1-phosphate aldolase (FucA)catalysed the formation of the expected (R,R)- or d-erythro aldol, except in the case of 4-nitrobutanal,from which the epimeric (R,S)- or l-threo aldol was also formed. l-Rhamnulose-1-phosphate aldolase con-sistently formed the expected (R,S)- or l-threo aldol together with a minor amount of (R,R)- or d-erythroaldol. The intramolecular Henry reaction was also found to be stereoselective, occurring spontaneouslyonce the aldol was formed due to the presence of both ketone and a terminally positioned nitro group.The combination of this set of reactions successfully furnished 11 nitrocyclitols which have not beendescribed previously in the literature. CNRS International Relationship service is thanked for mobilityfinancial support to F. Camps Bres. This work was also supportedin part, by the CNRS GDR RDR2 “Aller vers une chimie éco-compatible” Grant (to F.C.B.). E G-J. has been supported by theSpanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (Grants PI11/01436 andCTQ2010-19073/BQU). Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ari Asmi; Alfred Wiedensohler; Paolo Laj; A. M. Fjaeraa; Karine Sellegri; Wolfram Birmili; Ernest Weingartner; Urs Baltensperger; V. Zdimal; Nadezda Zikova; +27 more
    Countries: France, Norway, Ireland, Netherlands
    Project: EC | ATMNUCLE (227463)

    Two years of harmonized aerosol number size distribution data from 24 European field monitoring sites have been analysed. The results give a comprehensive overview of the European near surface aerosol particle number concentrations and number size distributions between 30 and 500 nm of dry particle diameter. Spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols in the particle sizes most important for climate applications are presented. We also analyse the annual, weekly and diurnal cycles of the aerosol number concentrations, provide log-normal fitting parameters for median number size distributions, and give guidance notes for data users. Emphasis is placed on the usability of results within the aerosol modelling community. <br></br> We also show that the aerosol number concentrations of Aitken and accumulation mode particles (with 100 nm dry diameter as a cut-off between modes) are related, although there is significant variation in the ratios of the modal number concentrations. Different aerosol and station types are distinguished from this data and this methodology has potential for further categorization of stations aerosol number size distribution types. <br></br> The European submicron aerosol was divided into characteristic types: Central European aerosol, characterized by single mode median size distributions, unimodal number concentration histograms and low variability in CCN-sized aerosol number concentrations; Nordic aerosol with low number concentrations, although showing pronounced seasonal variation of especially Aitken mode particles; Mountain sites (altitude over 1000 m a.s.l.) with a strong seasonal cycle in aerosol number concentrations, high variability, and very low median number concentrations. Southern and Western European regions had fewer stations, which decreases the regional coverage of these results. Aerosol number concentrations over the Britain and Ireland had very high variance and there are indications of mixed air masses from several source regions; the Mediterranean aerosol exhibit high seasonality, and a strong accumulation mode in the summer. The greatest concentrations were observed at the Ispra station in Northern Italy with high accumulation mode number concentrations in the winter. The aerosol number concentrations at the Arctic station Zeppelin in Ny-AA lesund in Svalbard have also a strong seasonal cycle, with greater concentrations of accumulation mode particles in winter, and dominating summer Aitken mode indicating more recently formed particles. Observed particles did not show any statistically significant regional work-week or weekday related variation in number concentrations studied. <br></br> Analysis products are made for open-access to the research community, available in a freely accessible internet site. The results give to the modelling community a reliable, easy-to-use and freely available comparison dataset of aerosol size distributions.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Drevet, Joël,; Gharagozloo, P.; Gutierrez-Adán, A.; Champroux, A.; Noblanc, A.; Kocer, A.; Calle, A.; Pérez-Cerezales, S.; Pericuesta, E.; Polhemus, A.; +3 more
    Countries: Spain, France

    STUDY QUESTION Does a novel antioxidant formulation designed to restore redox balance within the male reproductive tract, reduce sperm DNA damage and increase pregnancy rates in mouse models of sperm oxidative stress? SUMMARY ANSWER Oral administration of a novel antioxidant formulation significantly reduced sperm DNA damage in glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPX5), knockout mice and restored pregnancy rates to near-normal levels in mice subjected to scrotal heat stress. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Animal and human studies have documented the adverse effect of sperm DNA damage on fertilization rates, embryo quality, miscarriage rates and the transfer of de novo mutations to offspring. Semen samples of infertile men are known to be deficient in several key antioxidants relative to their fertile counterparts. Antioxidants alone or in combination have demonstrated limited efficacy against sperm oxidative stress and DNA damage in numerous human clinical trials, however these studies have not been definitive and an optimum combination has remained elusive. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The efficacy of the antioxidant formulation was evaluated in two well-established mouse models of oxidative stress, scrotal heating and Gpx5 knockout (KO) mice, (n = 12 per experimental group), by two independent laboratories. Mice were provided the antioxidant product in their drinking water for 2-8 weeks and compared with control groups for sperm DNA damage and pregnancy rates. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS In the Gpx5 KO model, oxidative DNA damage was monitored in spermatozoa by immunocytochemical detection of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8OHdG). In the scrotal heat stress model, male fertility was tested by partnering with three females for 5 days. The percentage of pregnant females, number of vaginal plugs, resorptions per litter, and litter size were recorded. MAIN RESULTS AND ROLE OF CHANCE Using immunocytochemical detection of 8OHdG as a biomarker of DNA oxidation, analysis of control mice revealed that around 30% of the sperm population was positively stained. This level increased to about 60% in transgenic mice deficient in the antioxidant enzyme, GPX5. Our results indicate that an 8 week pretreatment of Gpx5 KO mice with the antioxidant formulation provided complete protection of sperm DNA against oxidative damage. In mouse models of scrotal heat stress, only 35% (19/54) of female mice became pregnant resulting in 169 fetuses with 18% fetal resorption (30/169). This is in contrast to the antioxidant pretreated group where 74% (42/57) of female mice became pregnant, resulting in 427 fetuses with 9% fetal resorption (38/427). In both animal models the protection provided by the novel antioxidant was statistically significant (P < 0.01 for the reduction of 8OHdG in the spermatozoa of Gpx5 KO mice and P < 0.05 for increase in fertility in the scrotal heat stress model). LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION It was not possible to determine the exact level of antioxidant consumption for each mouse during the treatment period. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Recent clinical studies confirm moderate to severe sperm DNA damage in about 60% of all men visiting IVF centers and in about 80% of men diagnosed with idiopathic male infertility. Our results, if confirmed in humans, will impact clinical fertility practice because they support the concept of using an efficacious antioxidant supplementation as a preconception therapy, in order to optimize fertilization rates, help to maintain a healthy pregnancy and limit the mutational load carried by children. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) The study was funded by the Clermont Universite and the University of Madrid. P.G. is the Managing Director of CellOxess LLC, which has a commercial interest in the detection and resolution of oxidative stress. A.M.;A.P. are employees of CellOxess, LLC. J.R.D.;A.G.-A.;R.J.A. are honorary members of the CellOxess advisory board. © 2016 The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction a d Embryology. All rights reserved.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fatima Cardoso; Stella Kyriakides; S. Ohno; Frédérique Penault-Llorca; Philip Poortmans; Isabel T. Rubio; Sophia Zackrisson; Elżbieta Senkus;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience

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