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15,119 Projects, page 1 of 1,512

  • 2011
  • 2014

10
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  • Funder: NSF Project Code: 1100020
    Partners: University of Michigan–Flint
  • Project . 2011 - 2014
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 620045
    Funder Contribution: 50,000 GBP
    Partners: University of London

    Awaiting Public Project Summary

  • Funder: NSF Project Code: 1109712
    Partners: Keystone College
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DC010827-02
    Funder Contribution: 361,789 USD
    Partners: University of Michigan
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 100900
    Funder Contribution: 270,540 GBP
    Partners: Kurt J. Lesker Company Limited

    The overall aim of this project is to develop prototype low cost, lightweight organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, exploiting our patented multi-junction cell technology which will enable power conversion efficiencies of >8% and accelerated lifetimes equivalent to at least 3 years in the field. New transparent conducting electrodes will be incorporated into the cells, eliminating the requirement for Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and enabling the technology to overcome one of the key obstacles to low cost manufacture. New thin film deposition technology will also be developed, allowing more efficient use of materials in the fabrication process and consistent with the need to reduce costs. The prototypes will demonstrate performance characteristics compatible with subsequent scale-up to product manufacture and commercialisation in the medium term for markets such as portable solar chargers for consumer electronics and auxiliary power for automotive and building integrated applications.

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R21NS072707-02
    Funder Contribution: 191,398 USD
    Partners: Duke University
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 135420
    Funder Contribution: 755,000
    Partners: ISREC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1H79TI023762-01
    Partners: COMMUNITY BRIDGES, INC.
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G1000769
    Funder Contribution: 411,951 GBP
    Partners: University of Reading

    Human enterovirus 71 causes epidemic outbreaks of mild febrile illness during childhood in Western countries. There are occasional complications but the virus is generally assumed to be innocuous and is only monitored periodically by the health authorities. In the Far East however, EV71 outbreaks are associated with an increased incidence of severe infection and encephalitis. It is unclear if this is because of the particular strains that circulate or if the genetics of the population favour a severe outcome. In either case a vaccine for EV71 would be a valuable preventive measure. A number of possibilities have been examined for production of a vaccine but all have so far failed to give a high level of protective immunity. Of the candidates examined ?empty capsid? vaccines, which are a safe non-infectious version of the authentic EV71 virus particle, have been shown to be the most promising. However, empty capsids are difficult to manufacture making their development to a marketable vaccine unsure. We have developed a new methodology that reproducibly produces empty capsid at high yield offering a potentially viable route for manufacture. In this application we are seeking to apply this technology to the production of an empty capsid vaccine for EV71 and to demonstrate its success in the generation of protective immunity. The work will be done in collaboration with the UK Health Protection Agency and the company Sentinext, based in Malaysia, who are actively working with regional strains and vaccine development.

search
15,119 Projects, page 1 of 1,512
  • Funder: NSF Project Code: 1100020
    Partners: University of Michigan–Flint
  • Project . 2011 - 2014
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 620045
    Funder Contribution: 50,000 GBP
    Partners: University of London

    Awaiting Public Project Summary

  • Funder: NSF Project Code: 1109712
    Partners: Keystone College
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DC010827-02
    Funder Contribution: 361,789 USD
    Partners: University of Michigan
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 100900
    Funder Contribution: 270,540 GBP
    Partners: Kurt J. Lesker Company Limited

    The overall aim of this project is to develop prototype low cost, lightweight organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, exploiting our patented multi-junction cell technology which will enable power conversion efficiencies of >8% and accelerated lifetimes equivalent to at least 3 years in the field. New transparent conducting electrodes will be incorporated into the cells, eliminating the requirement for Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and enabling the technology to overcome one of the key obstacles to low cost manufacture. New thin film deposition technology will also be developed, allowing more efficient use of materials in the fabrication process and consistent with the need to reduce costs. The prototypes will demonstrate performance characteristics compatible with subsequent scale-up to product manufacture and commercialisation in the medium term for markets such as portable solar chargers for consumer electronics and auxiliary power for automotive and building integrated applications.

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R21NS072707-02
    Funder Contribution: 191,398 USD
    Partners: Duke University
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 135420
    Funder Contribution: 755,000
    Partners: ISREC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1H79TI023762-01
    Partners: COMMUNITY BRIDGES, INC.
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G1000769
    Funder Contribution: 411,951 GBP
    Partners: University of Reading

    Human enterovirus 71 causes epidemic outbreaks of mild febrile illness during childhood in Western countries. There are occasional complications but the virus is generally assumed to be innocuous and is only monitored periodically by the health authorities. In the Far East however, EV71 outbreaks are associated with an increased incidence of severe infection and encephalitis. It is unclear if this is because of the particular strains that circulate or if the genetics of the population favour a severe outcome. In either case a vaccine for EV71 would be a valuable preventive measure. A number of possibilities have been examined for production of a vaccine but all have so far failed to give a high level of protective immunity. Of the candidates examined ?empty capsid? vaccines, which are a safe non-infectious version of the authentic EV71 virus particle, have been shown to be the most promising. However, empty capsids are difficult to manufacture making their development to a marketable vaccine unsure. We have developed a new methodology that reproducibly produces empty capsid at high yield offering a potentially viable route for manufacture. In this application we are seeking to apply this technology to the production of an empty capsid vaccine for EV71 and to demonstrate its success in the generation of protective immunity. The work will be done in collaboration with the UK Health Protection Agency and the company Sentinext, based in Malaysia, who are actively working with regional strains and vaccine development.

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