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8,222 Projects, page 2 of 823

  • UK Research and Innovation
  • 2015

10
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 320056
    Funder Contribution: 600 GBP
    Partners: Centre for Factories of the Future Limited

    Awaiting Public Project Summary

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 509444
    Funder Contribution: 31,170 GBP
    Partners: University of Warwick

    To understand the lifetime performance of composites. Develop an 'artificial' ageing process to improve their impact properties. Produce a technology demonstrator which makes use of the technology/process for purpose of marketing to potential clients.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/N509103/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,957,400 GBP
    Partners: University of Cambridge

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at www.rcuk.ac.uk/StudentshipTerminology. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/N005279/1
    Funder Contribution: 389,910 GBP
    Partners: University of Warwick

    The economic importance of seed plants cannot be overstated, as they are our main sources of food, fibre and other industrial raw materials. However, our capacity to generate sufficient food, animal feed and energy is increasingly compromised by human population expansion, competition for land use, rapid biodiversity loss and predicted global climate change. The process of sexual reproduction in higher plants is of particular importance for the aim of increasing crop yields, overcoming hybridization barriers and selecting and fixing quality traits. Before we can develop tools to manipulate plant reproduction in our favour we must achieve a deeper understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying gamete development and double fertilization mechanisms in angiosperms. The project will deliver the first comprehensive view of the molecular evolution of plant sexual reproduction and will provide insights into the origins of double fertilization in flowering plants. In addition, gene expression data and the networks generated will be valuable in understanding the evolution of biological pathways and gene function prediction beyond the focus on reproduction in this project. In parallel, the work on crop species will identify genes useful to the agricultural industry to enable precision control of plant reproduction, to overcome hybridization barriers and to promote better breeding schemes by improving hybrid seed production.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/M008096/1
    Funder Contribution: 123,133 GBP
    Partners: SRUC

    Life-End summary Sustainable production of safe chicken is an international priority and preserving bird welfare is a key component of this. Current intensive (broiler) production can compromise bird health and welfare and food safety and there are strong links between poor bird welfare and the Campylobacter public health threat. Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea in the EU and despite millions of pounds of research funding it is estimated that contaminated chicken caused ~700000 human campylobacteriosis cases in the UK in 2013 with around 100 deaths. Infection is characterised by severe abdominal pain and acute (sometimes bloody) diarrhoea and costs the UK an estimated £1 billion per year. Campylobacter contamination of chicken takes two forms. First, surface contamination of carcasses leads to cross-contamination in the kitchen. Second, and perhaps of greater importance than currently thought, contamination within muscle and liver tissues, increasing the health risk by facilitating bacterial survival during cooking. Chickens in poor production environments or exposed to stress are more susceptible to Campylobacter and in such birds the bacteria show greater extra-intestinal spread to edible tissues, possibly as a consequence of disturbance to the gut environment. Therefore, improvements in broiler welfare have great potential to improve public health but there is an urgent need for information on the effect of stress to inform targeted interventions to reduce Campylobacter in broiler chickens. One acutely stressful event in the life of broilers, in any production stream, is harvest when birds are removed from the farm for slaughter. We define the process as comprising: food withdrawal, catching, transport and stunning by either gas or electricity. Although there is a growing body of evidence that these stressors can increase Campylobacter growth rates as well as extra-intestinal spread, there is a paucity of data on their relative importance or how they may select for particular types of Campylobacter. By examining the harvest processes using large scale industry-relevant experimental conditions, state-of-the-art genomics, molecular microbiology and mathematical modelling techniques, we will determine the impact of harvest on gut health in broilers. We will combine this with a study to identify bacterial genetic determinants involved in extra-intestinal spread of Campylobacter to edible tissues. We will quantify the relative impact of each stage of harvest on the gut bacterial population and the physiology and immunity of the birds, and investigate the role these play in controlling extra-intestinal spread of Campylobacter. This multidisciplinary research programme will enhance understanding of the influence of the harvest process on bird gut health and Campylobacter. The quantitative information and modelling will be used to provide direct advice to industry about the elements of the harvest processes that provide the best opportunity for interventions that will mitigate the ongoing challenge of Campylobacter contamination in chicken meat.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132142
    Funder Contribution: 51,074 GBP
    Partners: Fraunhofer UK Research

    Offshore renewable energy such as tidal, wave and offshore wind is an important part of the UK energy supply and is becoming more so. However there are challenges when it comes to operating in an offshore or marine environment. The cable infrastructure can be vulnerable to being dragged or worn. The transmission capacity can limit the ammount of energy taken from a device or device array. Repair of offshore cables or infrastructure is costly. This project seeks to investigate the feasibiity of combining two types of sensor technology on a shared optical fibre network that can provide real time monitoring of electrical performance and also the physical condition of a cable in a marine energy project. The proposed system would use pre- existing optical fibre already on the installed power cable to opticallly interrogate electrical sensors and to also perform as a dsitributed sensor The expected outcome from the project is a system level design with technical and commercial development plan to fully exploit this technology.

  • Project . 2015 - 2016
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132070
    Funder Contribution: 30,100 GBP
    Partners: Glen Dimplex Home Appliances Limited

    In preserving and extending the life of food, medicines or drugs, fridges would seem like a circular economy hero, but they make up one of the largest part of UK e-waste, contain complex constuctions or materials that are hard to reuse or recycle, and have not got more durable or longer lasting over the years. Fridges are simply not designed, made or sold with circularity in mind. Bringing together Glen Dimplex Home Appliances fridge market and manufacturing know-how, The Sure Chill Company's new, more circular refridgeration technology and Seymourpowell's innovation, design and sustainability expertise, this project aims to rethink fridges for a circular economy. Using a design-led innovation process, our feasibility study will investigate and identify a new circular business model for Professional fridges - initially for UK Catering and Medical customers. Proving successsful would divert 600 tons of fridges from e-waste p/a, and then be scaled up by GDHA to other segments, markets and appliances

  • Project . 2015 - 2015
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 751912
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP
    Partners: Stay Under Cover Limited

    Bedding range that does not fall off of the bed. Will be used mainly for children, elderly and disabled market but can equally be used by anybody.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 752340
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP
    Partners: Wearable Concepts Limited

    "At Product Resolutions they combine creativity, innovation and technical knowledge to help us make commercially successful new products. It’s not just about the way it looks. When they design a new product they think about how it's used by the consumer, how it can be assembled in the factory and how we can ensure it hits the development budget. Their approach works with all types of products and companies from entrepreneurs and inventors through to market leading brands. Website http://productresolutions.com/ They are a registered supplier. "

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MR/M024679/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,943,630 GBP
    Partners: University of Leicester

    One hundred and ten million primary surgical incisions occur globally every year, with those made in areas of high tension particularly prone to scarring. Scarring is the result of the natural process of wound repair, generated by excessive cell behaviour in the healing wound. Depending on the body location, wound scars can be emotionally (face) and physically (joint) debilitating. This is especially true for some patients who suffer significant darkening (hyperpigmentation) of the skin at the site of damage, making any injury particularly traumatic. In addition, the care of wound scars places a heavy financial burden on healthcare systems worldwide. An effective scar prevention treatment would benefit the millions of patients with skin injury, enhancing the patient's health and quality of life. There are currently no proven treatments available to prevent wound scarring. Salbutamol is a safe and well-tolerated pharmaceutical, which has been a mainstay of asthma therapy in the UK since 1968. Research in the Pullar lab and other labs has shown that salbutamol can modulate wound repair processes. Uniquely, when salbutamol is applied to the wound site, it alters the way the wound heals, curbing excessive cell behaviour and moving the healing process away from scarring and towards normal skin regeneration. In a pig wound model, salbutamol reduced scar area and hyperpigmentation by almost 50%, 56 days post-wounding, significantly improving scar appearance. Here, stable salbutamol and placebo gels will be manufactured for topical use in skin wounds in accordance with good manufacturing practices. Non-clinical studies will be performed in a pig wound model in accordance with good laboratory practices to ensure safety (pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and skin toxicology), to satisfy regulatory requirements and determine the optimum 1x dose for skin scar prevention in the first-in-human clinical trial (CT). To move towards therapeutic implementation, the phase I CT is designed as a within-volunteer, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled dose escalation trial. A robust recruitment plan will recruit 45 healthy volunteers who will be recruited into three groups of 0.5x, 1x (selected from the pre-CT) and 2x salbutamol formulation, starting with the lowest dose. The study, performed in accordance with good clinical practice, will be for 12 months. 2cm linear incisions will be made at the same anatomical location under each arm of volunteers and placebo and salbutamol dose will be randomised between left and right arms. Incisions will be treated daily for 60 days. The primarily trial objective will be to assess safety and tolerability of topical salbutamol when applied to linear incisions. Blood samples will be collected at day 0/1 after surgery to perform PK analysis to determine if peak salbutamol plasma levels are acceptable. Skin tolerance will be assessed at each site daily. Adverse events will be recorded. Interim analysis of safety will be provided after the 0.5x dose to progress to the higher dose. The secondary objective is to determine the optimal topical salbutamol dose for scar improvement. Wound healing and scar assessments will compare the active dose and placebo in each volunteer's paired, contralateral scars at 6, 9 and 12 months post-wounding, when scars are considered fully mature. The data will determine whether this study will pave the way for further CTs within patients with surgical procedures prone to scarring. In addition to the benefit to patients, this treatment would also benefit the surgeons and the NHS. Patients would heal better, leave hospital sooner and require less scar revision surgery, which would provide significant cost savings. Demonstrated efficacy in skin scar prevention could pave the way to the use of salbutamol to prevent excessive skin scarring (keloids - raised, progressively enlarging scars at the wound site) and fibrosis in other tissues.

search
8,222 Projects, page 2 of 823
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 320056
    Funder Contribution: 600 GBP
    Partners: Centre for Factories of the Future Limited

    Awaiting Public Project Summary

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 509444
    Funder Contribution: 31,170 GBP
    Partners: University of Warwick

    To understand the lifetime performance of composites. Develop an 'artificial' ageing process to improve their impact properties. Produce a technology demonstrator which makes use of the technology/process for purpose of marketing to potential clients.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/N509103/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,957,400 GBP
    Partners: University of Cambridge

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at www.rcuk.ac.uk/StudentshipTerminology. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/N005279/1
    Funder Contribution: 389,910 GBP
    Partners: University of Warwick

    The economic importance of seed plants cannot be overstated, as they are our main sources of food, fibre and other industrial raw materials. However, our capacity to generate sufficient food, animal feed and energy is increasingly compromised by human population expansion, competition for land use, rapid biodiversity loss and predicted global climate change. The process of sexual reproduction in higher plants is of particular importance for the aim of increasing crop yields, overcoming hybridization barriers and selecting and fixing quality traits. Before we can develop tools to manipulate plant reproduction in our favour we must achieve a deeper understanding of the basic mechanisms underlying gamete development and double fertilization mechanisms in angiosperms. The project will deliver the first comprehensive view of the molecular evolution of plant sexual reproduction and will provide insights into the origins of double fertilization in flowering plants. In addition, gene expression data and the networks generated will be valuable in understanding the evolution of biological pathways and gene function prediction beyond the focus on reproduction in this project. In parallel, the work on crop species will identify genes useful to the agricultural industry to enable precision control of plant reproduction, to overcome hybridization barriers and to promote better breeding schemes by improving hybrid seed production.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/M008096/1
    Funder Contribution: 123,133 GBP
    Partners: SRUC

    Life-End summary Sustainable production of safe chicken is an international priority and preserving bird welfare is a key component of this. Current intensive (broiler) production can compromise bird health and welfare and food safety and there are strong links between poor bird welfare and the Campylobacter public health threat. Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea in the EU and despite millions of pounds of research funding it is estimated that contaminated chicken caused ~700000 human campylobacteriosis cases in the UK in 2013 with around 100 deaths. Infection is characterised by severe abdominal pain and acute (sometimes bloody) diarrhoea and costs the UK an estimated £1 billion per year. Campylobacter contamination of chicken takes two forms. First, surface contamination of carcasses leads to cross-contamination in the kitchen. Second, and perhaps of greater importance than currently thought, contamination within muscle and liver tissues, increasing the health risk by facilitating bacterial survival during cooking. Chickens in poor production environments or exposed to stress are more susceptible to Campylobacter and in such birds the bacteria show greater extra-intestinal spread to edible tissues, possibly as a consequence of disturbance to the gut environment. Therefore, improvements in broiler welfare have great potential to improve public health but there is an urgent need for information on the effect of stress to inform targeted interventions to reduce Campylobacter in broiler chickens. One acutely stressful event in the life of broilers, in any production stream, is harvest when birds are removed from the farm for slaughter. We define the process as comprising: food withdrawal, catching, transport and stunning by either gas or electricity. Although there is a growing body of evidence that these stressors can increase Campylobacter growth rates as well as extra-intestinal spread, there is a paucity of data on their relative importance or how they may select for particular types of Campylobacter. By examining the harvest processes using large scale industry-relevant experimental conditions, state-of-the-art genomics, molecular microbiology and mathematical modelling techniques, we will determine the impact of harvest on gut health in broilers. We will combine this with a study to identify bacterial genetic determinants involved in extra-intestinal spread of Campylobacter to edible tissues. We will quantify the relative impact of each stage of harvest on the gut bacterial population and the physiology and immunity of the birds, and investigate the role these play in controlling extra-intestinal spread of Campylobacter. This multidisciplinary research programme will enhance understanding of the influence of the harvest process on bird gut health and Campylobacter. The quantitative information and modelling will be used to provide direct advice to industry about the elements of the harvest processes that provide the best opportunity for interventions that will mitigate the ongoing challenge of Campylobacter contamination in chicken meat.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132142
    Funder Contribution: 51,074 GBP
    Partners: Fraunhofer UK Research

    Offshore renewable energy such as tidal, wave and offshore wind is an important part of the UK energy supply and is becoming more so. However there are challenges when it comes to operating in an offshore or marine environment. The cable infrastructure can be vulnerable to being dragged or worn. The transmission capacity can limit the ammount of energy taken from a device or device array. Repair of offshore cables or infrastructure is costly. This project seeks to investigate the feasibiity of combining two types of sensor technology on a shared optical fibre network that can provide real time monitoring of electrical performance and also the physical condition of a cable in a marine energy project. The proposed system would use pre- existing optical fibre already on the installed power cable to opticallly interrogate electrical sensors and to also perform as a dsitributed sensor The expected outcome from the project is a system level design with technical and commercial development plan to fully exploit this technology.

  • Project . 2015 - 2016
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 132070
    Funder Contribution: 30,100 GBP
    Partners: Glen Dimplex Home Appliances Limited

    In preserving and extending the life of food, medicines or drugs, fridges would seem like a circular economy hero, but they make up one of the largest part of UK e-waste, contain complex constuctions or materials that are hard to reuse or recycle, and have not got more durable or longer lasting over the years. Fridges are simply not designed, made or sold with circularity in mind. Bringing together Glen Dimplex Home Appliances fridge market and manufacturing know-how, The Sure Chill Company's new, more circular refridgeration technology and Seymourpowell's innovation, design and sustainability expertise, this project aims to rethink fridges for a circular economy. Using a design-led innovation process, our feasibility study will investigate and identify a new circular business model for Professional fridges - initially for UK Catering and Medical customers. Proving successsful would divert 600 tons of fridges from e-waste p/a, and then be scaled up by GDHA to other segments, markets and appliances

  • Project . 2015 - 2015
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 751912
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP
    Partners: Stay Under Cover Limited

    Bedding range that does not fall off of the bed. Will be used mainly for children, elderly and disabled market but can equally be used by anybody.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 752340
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP
    Partners: Wearable Concepts Limited

    "At Product Resolutions they combine creativity, innovation and technical knowledge to help us make commercially successful new products. It’s not just about the way it looks. When they design a new product they think about how it's used by the consumer, how it can be assembled in the factory and how we can ensure it hits the development budget. Their approach works with all types of products and companies from entrepreneurs and inventors through to market leading brands. Website http://productresolutions.com/ They are a registered supplier. "

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MR/M024679/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,943,630 GBP
    Partners: University of Leicester

    One hundred and ten million primary surgical incisions occur globally every year, with those made in areas of high tension particularly prone to scarring. Scarring is the result of the natural process of wound repair, generated by excessive cell behaviour in the healing wound. Depending on the body location, wound scars can be emotionally (face) and physically (joint) debilitating. This is especially true for some patients who suffer significant darkening (hyperpigmentation) of the skin at the site of damage, making any injury particularly traumatic. In addition, the care of wound scars places a heavy financial burden on healthcare systems worldwide. An effective scar prevention treatment would benefit the millions of patients with skin injury, enhancing the patient's health and quality of life. There are currently no proven treatments available to prevent wound scarring. Salbutamol is a safe and well-tolerated pharmaceutical, which has been a mainstay of asthma therapy in the UK since 1968. Research in the Pullar lab and other labs has shown that salbutamol can modulate wound repair processes. Uniquely, when salbutamol is applied to the wound site, it alters the way the wound heals, curbing excessive cell behaviour and moving the healing process away from scarring and towards normal skin regeneration. In a pig wound model, salbutamol reduced scar area and hyperpigmentation by almost 50%, 56 days post-wounding, significantly improving scar appearance. Here, stable salbutamol and placebo gels will be manufactured for topical use in skin wounds in accordance with good manufacturing practices. Non-clinical studies will be performed in a pig wound model in accordance with good laboratory practices to ensure safety (pharmacokinetic (PK) studies and skin toxicology), to satisfy regulatory requirements and determine the optimum 1x dose for skin scar prevention in the first-in-human clinical trial (CT). To move towards therapeutic implementation, the phase I CT is designed as a within-volunteer, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled dose escalation trial. A robust recruitment plan will recruit 45 healthy volunteers who will be recruited into three groups of 0.5x, 1x (selected from the pre-CT) and 2x salbutamol formulation, starting with the lowest dose. The study, performed in accordance with good clinical practice, will be for 12 months. 2cm linear incisions will be made at the same anatomical location under each arm of volunteers and placebo and salbutamol dose will be randomised between left and right arms. Incisions will be treated daily for 60 days. The primarily trial objective will be to assess safety and tolerability of topical salbutamol when applied to linear incisions. Blood samples will be collected at day 0/1 after surgery to perform PK analysis to determine if peak salbutamol plasma levels are acceptable. Skin tolerance will be assessed at each site daily. Adverse events will be recorded. Interim analysis of safety will be provided after the 0.5x dose to progress to the higher dose. The secondary objective is to determine the optimal topical salbutamol dose for scar improvement. Wound healing and scar assessments will compare the active dose and placebo in each volunteer's paired, contralateral scars at 6, 9 and 12 months post-wounding, when scars are considered fully mature. The data will determine whether this study will pave the way for further CTs within patients with surgical procedures prone to scarring. In addition to the benefit to patients, this treatment would also benefit the surgeons and the NHS. Patients would heal better, leave hospital sooner and require less scar revision surgery, which would provide significant cost savings. Demonstrated efficacy in skin scar prevention could pave the way to the use of salbutamol to prevent excessive skin scarring (keloids - raised, progressively enlarging scars at the wound site) and fibrosis in other tissues.

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