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352 Projects, page 1 of 36

  • UK Research and Innovation
  • 2015
  • 2020

10
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/N509413/1
    Funder Contribution: 242,010 GBP
    Partners: University of York

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at www.rcuk.ac.uk/StudentshipTerminology. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: MC_UU_12017/10
    Funder Contribution: 2,468,610 GBP
    Partners: University of Glasgow

    We are trying to find out what it is about where people live that influences their health and ability to lead a healthy life. Knowing more about what matters and whether it matters more for some people compared to others, for example those living in deprived areas compared to more affluent neighbourhoods, men or women, adults or children, means that we will have valuable information for policy makers to plan services that can make a difference to people’s health and daily lives. We are particularly interested in how children’s environments might influence how physically active they are, as this is associated with the likelihood of them being overweight and there is little knowledge on how the local environment impacts on this. To research this we are asking over 1500 10 year old children across Scotland to wear a device (Actigraph) to measure their physical activity and another device (Geographical Positioning System (GPS)) to detect the places they are most active over one week. This is a unique study which will shed light on the ways in which children use their local neighbourhood and which aspects e.g. greenspace, impact on their physical activity, thereby providing useful evidence for planning services.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M020207/1
    Funder Contribution: 977,312 GBP
    Partners: Imperial College London, ROLLS-ROYCE PLC, RCNDE, Tenaris, BP British Petroleum, BAM, University of Salford, MTC

    If imaging required less data, it would enable faster throughput, improved performance in restricted access situations and simpler, cheaper hardware. The information from images enables damage to be accurately quantified within engineering components, avoiding the need to choose between excessive conservatism and unpredicted failures. To enable improved reconstructions from limited data sets, a diverse set of approaches have been identified, incorporating knowledge of physical wave interaction with objects, use of external information, image processing and other techniques. The fellowship will address the broad problem by applying these approaches to several example applications which are of great interest to industry, and will ultimately enable the development of the field of limited data imaging. While primarily focused on NDE (non-destructive evaluation), the applications of this spread to areas including medicine, geophysics and security.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M000605/1
    Funder Contribution: 256,835 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    The NanoESCA is an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) photoemission spectroscopy system with sub-micron spatial resolution for real-space and k-space (reciprocal space) mapping from areas of a few microns of flat material surfaces, and the capability to perform quantitative chemical state mapping at the nanoscale. The system is designed for installation on a synchrotron beam line end-station or in a Nano Science Laboratory. The system has various modes of operation. UV photon sources are used for Ultra-violet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Angle Resolved UPS, and Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), soft X-rays are used for X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). UPS gives energy filtered information on weakly bound states and the valence band structure in real space and the surface electronic band structure in k-space. XPS is used to probe core level spectra to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of a surface. In contrast to the high resolution Scanning Electron Microscope, PEEM directly images surface areas emitting photoelectrons in real time without scanning. By energy filtering PEEM images it is possible to obtain quantitative maps of surface work function. The field of view is adjustable from millimetres to microns allowing high resolution imaging of features as small as 30nm (UPS modes) and 480nm (XPS mode). The NanoESCA machine being requested represents the next generation in imaging and spectroscopic PEEM. It uses an extension of the established parallel imaging technique, to simultaneously image and filter photoelectrons, by using a double hemispherical (aberration corrected) electron analyser in combination with high photon flux VUV and X-ray sources, to realise nano scale imaging and spectroscopy in real space and in k-space; the latter mode allows information on the electronic band structure of materials to be visualised and compared directly with theoretical models. Uniquely, this capability to obtain nanoscale spectroscopy using either X-ray or VUV sources is obtained by parallel imaging through the same PEEM 'column' which also acts as the entrance lens of the imaging spectrometer.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: ST/N000358/1
    Funder Contribution: 3,919,690 GBP
    Partners: University of Glasgow

    The four-year timescale is particularly exciting with the opening of a new energy frontier in LHC Run 2. We will focus our efforts on searches for BSM processes in the Higgs and top sectors for ATLAS, in the kaon sector for NA62, and in the charm and beauty sector for LHCb. We are simultaneously entering a major construction phase where synergies have been established between our ATLAS, LHCb and ILC detector developments. We anticipate that MICE will demonstrate ionization cooling as a major step towards a neutrino factory and Japan, with the international community, will decide to build the ILC. We have developed detector development and construction capacity to contribute to this future programme and have built up our technician and engineering effort in a carefully planned approach. Improved analysis techniques, well-calibrated detectors, increased computing power and theoretical input will be essential and we are at the forefront of the required developments in these areas. All academics are heavily involved in the LHC programme and our strategy is to generate leading-edge physics results from three experiments (ATLAS, LHCb and NA62) based upon expertise developed in those experiments. We will provide timely first results in Higgs H->bb modes for ATLAS, based upon our current expertise. Having secured high-quality completion in Run 1, we will ensure that this experience will underpin future ATLAS publications. Based on our earlier work, we will be key players in answering questions concerning the origin of mass and the nature of CP violation. For LHCb, we will measure rare two body B decays, search for CP violation in charm and make precision measurements of CP violation in the Bs sector. We will measure the CKM angle gamma from loop-mediated processes which offer significant new physics sensitivity. We will perform new measurements and search for new states in the spectroscopy of charmed baryons and excited beauty mesons. For NA62 we will maintain the UK expertise in measuring the ratio of kaon decays to electrons and muons, establish measurements of the ratio of kaon and pion decays and search for dark photons. We continue to invest in and promote a world-class Detector Development activity to enable longer-term initiatives and our Grid strength is aimed at maximising our impact in LHC physics as well as promoting new areas such as the linear collider. We additionally lever significant support through the College in these areas. We have set up physics analysis streams for each experiment, using the Grid, and will continue to fully exploit the LHC Run 2 data. We will also maintain our involvement in longer-term initiatives where we have leadership roles. We presently have leading roles in the ATLAS and LHCb upgrades, the linear collider and future neutrino initiatives. We anticipate greater involvement in these forward-looking programmes, based upon discoveries made at the LHC. Over the next four years we will develop these areas and progress those where early investment will become most productive, consistent with our highest priority of LHC physics exploitation. To enhance the priority programme, we will be supported via the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA). This will ensure that we can meet our priorities in silicon detector development via support of the LHC upgrade and other programmes. We anticipate working with the IGR where we gain from joint facilities. This strategy is well suited to the skills and capacity of our core group. The associated responsive effort will be essential at a critical point in the evolution of UK particle physics.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M024385/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,184,070 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol, Defence Science & Tech Lab DSTL, Heriot-Watt University, University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY, NPL, Astrazeneca Plc, UT, University of Glasgow, Sandia National Laboratories...

    Sensors permeate our society, measurement underpins quantitative action and standardized accurate measurements are a foundation of all commerce. The ability to measure parameters and sense phenomena with increasing precision has always led to dramatic advances in science and in technology - for example X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), interferometry and the scanning-tunneling microscope. Our rapidly growing understanding of how to engineer and control quantum systems vastly expands the limits of measurement and of sensing, opening up opportunities in radically alternative methods to the current state of the art in sensing. Through the developments proposed in this Fellowship, I aim to deliver sensors enhanced by the harnessing of unique quantum mechanical phenomena and principles inspired by insights into quantum physics to develop a series of prototypes with end-users. I plan to provide alternative approaches to the state of the art, to potentially reduce overall cost and dramatically increase capability, to reach new limits of precision measurement and to develop this technology for commercialization. Light is an excellent probe for sensing and measurement. Unique wavelength dependent absorption, and reemission of photons by atoms enable the properties of matter to be measured and the identification of constituent components. Interferometers provide ultra-sensitive measurement of optical path length changes on the nanometer-scale, translating to physical changes in distance, material expansion or sample density for example. However, for any canonical optical sensor, quantum mechanics predicts a fundamental limit of how much noise in such experiment can be suppressed - this is the so-called shot noise and is routinely observed as a noise floor when using a laser, the canonical "clean" source of radiation. By harnessing the quantum properties of light, it is possible reach precision beyond shot noise, enabling a new paradigm of precision sensors to be realized. Such quantum-enhanced sensors can use less light in the optical probe to gain the same level of precision in a conventional optical sensor. This enables, for example: the reduction of detrimental absorption in biological samples that can alter sample properties or damage it; the resolution of weak signals in trace gas detection; reduction of photon pressure in interferometry that can alter the measurement outcome; increase in precision when a limit of optical laser input is reached. Quantum-enhanced techniques are being used by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) scientific collaboration to reach sub-shot noise precision interferometry of gravitational wave detection in kilometer-scale Michelson interferometers (GEO600). However, there is otherwise a distinct lack of practical devices that prove the potential of quantum-enhanced sensing as a disruptive technology for healthcare, precision manufacture, national security and commerce. For quantum-enhanced sensors to become small-scale, portable and therefore practical for an increased range of applications outside of the specialized quantum optics laboratory, it is clear that there is an urgent need to engineer an integrated optics platform, tailored to the needs of quantum-enhanced sensing. Requirements include robustness, miniaturization inherent phase stability and greater efficiency. Lithographic fabrication of much of the platform offers repeatable and affordable manufacture. My Fellowship proposal aims to bring together revolutionary quantum-enhanced sensing capabilities and photonic chip scale architectures. This will enable capabilities beyond the limits of classical physics for: absorbance spectroscopy, lab-on-chip interferometry and process tomography (revealing an unknown quantum process with fewer measurements and fewer probe photons).

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 1725657
    Partners: University of London

    This PhD project aims to explore business to business innovation, exploring how suppliers and customers can accelerate innovation to market in the business environment. It focuses on the management science behind innovation and how this is applied in the construction sector at a business level. It touches upon a procurement as a stimulus for innovation through the contracting process across the supply chain. Of particular interest is capturing good practices across businesses and lessons learnt. This research will examine processes of encouraging, stimulating and applying innovation from other sectors.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2307467
    Partners: QUB

    The aim of this project is design two implants systems that can communicate with each other through a wireless scheme.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ST/N000315/1
    Funder Contribution: 380,394 GBP
    Partners: Durham University

    The successful interpretation of data from modern high-energy particle physics experiments is a complex process involving not only the actual measurement but also the input of a variety of theoretical or phenomenological models and processes, which, of course, rely on previous data. The HEPData project at the IPPP Durham will continue to compile HEP Experimental scattering data from particle physics experiments around the world and make these freely and openly available. It will keep these data easily accessible and thus promote them to a wider audience. The data in HEPData allow, among others, the planning and interpretation of new measurements and the re-interpretation of older data in light of new findings, precision tests of theoretical models and the extraction of fundamental parameters or their limits, and the tuning and validation of simulation tools. Through a better integration with Inspire, the central publication database of particle physics, HEPData will provide a vastly improved persistent open-access repository of published data, serving as the living memory of particle physics. HEPData will eventually become a formal member of the emerging INSPIRE collaboration, which currently consists of CERN, DESY, SLAC, FERMILAB and IHEP in China, and will thus represent the UK particle physics community in one aspect of the global data preservation strategy in particle physics. One of the effects of this integration is that valuable time of the trained physicist managing HEPData will be freed for central and important aspects of data curation, for further developments and for a broadening of the scope of HEPData. This will include extending the abilities of the new HEPdata-Inspire framework with respect to the old HEPData database, for instance by allowing the inclusion of supporting material that has not been part of the journal publication, by allowing cross linking with essential analysis software, thus providing a more integrated vision for data persistence, and by adding other modes and formats for data submission by the experimenters. In addition, we plan to broaden the scope of HEPData, to incorporate also data from particle decays or low-energy or astro-particle experiments, and to include also data relevant for the construction of detector simulation. Providing a repository for such data will also be useful for other fields of science, such as material science, space science, or medical physics. HEPDATA will also continue to provide a server for Parton Distribution Function (PDF) codes and maintain and improve facilities for plotting them. It will take part in developing and maintaining LHAPDF, the new library of PDFs for use in current and future analyses.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 113051
    Funder Contribution: 1,507,970 GBP
    Partners: Phoenix Scientific Industries (U K) Ltd

    TiPOW is an initiative by a consortium of leading UK companies proposing to define the requirements and develop the processing techniques to provide high quality Titanium powder; enabling the production of aerospace components via 3D printing or Additive Manufacturing (AM). AM is a revolutionary manufacturing technology with the potential to enable the production of highly complex lightweight aircraft and aero-engine parts using advanced production systems that in some cases print parts layer by layer from metal powders. The advanced components produced by AM can be up to 50% lighter than conventional components; constructed using completely new and novel designs, resulting in substantial weight reduction and increased efficiency & performance. GKN, global Tier 1 supplier for the Aerospace and Automotive industries has partnered with Metalysis, PSI and the University of Leeds for this project; each bringing a wealth of experience and background managing technology collaborations.

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352 Projects, page 1 of 36
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/N509413/1
    Funder Contribution: 242,010 GBP
    Partners: University of York

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at www.rcuk.ac.uk/StudentshipTerminology. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: MC_UU_12017/10
    Funder Contribution: 2,468,610 GBP
    Partners: University of Glasgow

    We are trying to find out what it is about where people live that influences their health and ability to lead a healthy life. Knowing more about what matters and whether it matters more for some people compared to others, for example those living in deprived areas compared to more affluent neighbourhoods, men or women, adults or children, means that we will have valuable information for policy makers to plan services that can make a difference to people’s health and daily lives. We are particularly interested in how children’s environments might influence how physically active they are, as this is associated with the likelihood of them being overweight and there is little knowledge on how the local environment impacts on this. To research this we are asking over 1500 10 year old children across Scotland to wear a device (Actigraph) to measure their physical activity and another device (Geographical Positioning System (GPS)) to detect the places they are most active over one week. This is a unique study which will shed light on the ways in which children use their local neighbourhood and which aspects e.g. greenspace, impact on their physical activity, thereby providing useful evidence for planning services.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M020207/1
    Funder Contribution: 977,312 GBP
    Partners: Imperial College London, ROLLS-ROYCE PLC, RCNDE, Tenaris, BP British Petroleum, BAM, University of Salford, MTC

    If imaging required less data, it would enable faster throughput, improved performance in restricted access situations and simpler, cheaper hardware. The information from images enables damage to be accurately quantified within engineering components, avoiding the need to choose between excessive conservatism and unpredicted failures. To enable improved reconstructions from limited data sets, a diverse set of approaches have been identified, incorporating knowledge of physical wave interaction with objects, use of external information, image processing and other techniques. The fellowship will address the broad problem by applying these approaches to several example applications which are of great interest to industry, and will ultimately enable the development of the field of limited data imaging. While primarily focused on NDE (non-destructive evaluation), the applications of this spread to areas including medicine, geophysics and security.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M000605/1
    Funder Contribution: 256,835 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol

    The NanoESCA is an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) photoemission spectroscopy system with sub-micron spatial resolution for real-space and k-space (reciprocal space) mapping from areas of a few microns of flat material surfaces, and the capability to perform quantitative chemical state mapping at the nanoscale. The system is designed for installation on a synchrotron beam line end-station or in a Nano Science Laboratory. The system has various modes of operation. UV photon sources are used for Ultra-violet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS), Angle Resolved UPS, and Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), soft X-rays are used for X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). UPS gives energy filtered information on weakly bound states and the valence band structure in real space and the surface electronic band structure in k-space. XPS is used to probe core level spectra to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of a surface. In contrast to the high resolution Scanning Electron Microscope, PEEM directly images surface areas emitting photoelectrons in real time without scanning. By energy filtering PEEM images it is possible to obtain quantitative maps of surface work function. The field of view is adjustable from millimetres to microns allowing high resolution imaging of features as small as 30nm (UPS modes) and 480nm (XPS mode). The NanoESCA machine being requested represents the next generation in imaging and spectroscopic PEEM. It uses an extension of the established parallel imaging technique, to simultaneously image and filter photoelectrons, by using a double hemispherical (aberration corrected) electron analyser in combination with high photon flux VUV and X-ray sources, to realise nano scale imaging and spectroscopy in real space and in k-space; the latter mode allows information on the electronic band structure of materials to be visualised and compared directly with theoretical models. Uniquely, this capability to obtain nanoscale spectroscopy using either X-ray or VUV sources is obtained by parallel imaging through the same PEEM 'column' which also acts as the entrance lens of the imaging spectrometer.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: ST/N000358/1
    Funder Contribution: 3,919,690 GBP
    Partners: University of Glasgow

    The four-year timescale is particularly exciting with the opening of a new energy frontier in LHC Run 2. We will focus our efforts on searches for BSM processes in the Higgs and top sectors for ATLAS, in the kaon sector for NA62, and in the charm and beauty sector for LHCb. We are simultaneously entering a major construction phase where synergies have been established between our ATLAS, LHCb and ILC detector developments. We anticipate that MICE will demonstrate ionization cooling as a major step towards a neutrino factory and Japan, with the international community, will decide to build the ILC. We have developed detector development and construction capacity to contribute to this future programme and have built up our technician and engineering effort in a carefully planned approach. Improved analysis techniques, well-calibrated detectors, increased computing power and theoretical input will be essential and we are at the forefront of the required developments in these areas. All academics are heavily involved in the LHC programme and our strategy is to generate leading-edge physics results from three experiments (ATLAS, LHCb and NA62) based upon expertise developed in those experiments. We will provide timely first results in Higgs H->bb modes for ATLAS, based upon our current expertise. Having secured high-quality completion in Run 1, we will ensure that this experience will underpin future ATLAS publications. Based on our earlier work, we will be key players in answering questions concerning the origin of mass and the nature of CP violation. For LHCb, we will measure rare two body B decays, search for CP violation in charm and make precision measurements of CP violation in the Bs sector. We will measure the CKM angle gamma from loop-mediated processes which offer significant new physics sensitivity. We will perform new measurements and search for new states in the spectroscopy of charmed baryons and excited beauty mesons. For NA62 we will maintain the UK expertise in measuring the ratio of kaon decays to electrons and muons, establish measurements of the ratio of kaon and pion decays and search for dark photons. We continue to invest in and promote a world-class Detector Development activity to enable longer-term initiatives and our Grid strength is aimed at maximising our impact in LHC physics as well as promoting new areas such as the linear collider. We additionally lever significant support through the College in these areas. We have set up physics analysis streams for each experiment, using the Grid, and will continue to fully exploit the LHC Run 2 data. We will also maintain our involvement in longer-term initiatives where we have leadership roles. We presently have leading roles in the ATLAS and LHCb upgrades, the linear collider and future neutrino initiatives. We anticipate greater involvement in these forward-looking programmes, based upon discoveries made at the LHC. Over the next four years we will develop these areas and progress those where early investment will become most productive, consistent with our highest priority of LHC physics exploitation. To enhance the priority programme, we will be supported via the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA). This will ensure that we can meet our priorities in silicon detector development via support of the LHC upgrade and other programmes. We anticipate working with the IGR where we gain from joint facilities. This strategy is well suited to the skills and capacity of our core group. The associated responsive effort will be essential at a critical point in the evolution of UK particle physics.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M024385/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,184,070 GBP
    Partners: University of Bristol, Defence Science & Tech Lab DSTL, Heriot-Watt University, University of Adelaide, AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL UNIVERSITY, NPL, Astrazeneca Plc, UT, University of Glasgow, Sandia National Laboratories...

    Sensors permeate our society, measurement underpins quantitative action and standardized accurate measurements are a foundation of all commerce. The ability to measure parameters and sense phenomena with increasing precision has always led to dramatic advances in science and in technology - for example X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), interferometry and the scanning-tunneling microscope. Our rapidly growing understanding of how to engineer and control quantum systems vastly expands the limits of measurement and of sensing, opening up opportunities in radically alternative methods to the current state of the art in sensing. Through the developments proposed in this Fellowship, I aim to deliver sensors enhanced by the harnessing of unique quantum mechanical phenomena and principles inspired by insights into quantum physics to develop a series of prototypes with end-users. I plan to provide alternative approaches to the state of the art, to potentially reduce overall cost and dramatically increase capability, to reach new limits of precision measurement and to develop this technology for commercialization. Light is an excellent probe for sensing and measurement. Unique wavelength dependent absorption, and reemission of photons by atoms enable the properties of matter to be measured and the identification of constituent components. Interferometers provide ultra-sensitive measurement of optical path length changes on the nanometer-scale, translating to physical changes in distance, material expansion or sample density for example. However, for any canonical optical sensor, quantum mechanics predicts a fundamental limit of how much noise in such experiment can be suppressed - this is the so-called shot noise and is routinely observed as a noise floor when using a laser, the canonical "clean" source of radiation. By harnessing the quantum properties of light, it is possible reach precision beyond shot noise, enabling a new paradigm of precision sensors to be realized. Such quantum-enhanced sensors can use less light in the optical probe to gain the same level of precision in a conventional optical sensor. This enables, for example: the reduction of detrimental absorption in biological samples that can alter sample properties or damage it; the resolution of weak signals in trace gas detection; reduction of photon pressure in interferometry that can alter the measurement outcome; increase in precision when a limit of optical laser input is reached. Quantum-enhanced techniques are being used by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) scientific collaboration to reach sub-shot noise precision interferometry of gravitational wave detection in kilometer-scale Michelson interferometers (GEO600). However, there is otherwise a distinct lack of practical devices that prove the potential of quantum-enhanced sensing as a disruptive technology for healthcare, precision manufacture, national security and commerce. For quantum-enhanced sensors to become small-scale, portable and therefore practical for an increased range of applications outside of the specialized quantum optics laboratory, it is clear that there is an urgent need to engineer an integrated optics platform, tailored to the needs of quantum-enhanced sensing. Requirements include robustness, miniaturization inherent phase stability and greater efficiency. Lithographic fabrication of much of the platform offers repeatable and affordable manufacture. My Fellowship proposal aims to bring together revolutionary quantum-enhanced sensing capabilities and photonic chip scale architectures. This will enable capabilities beyond the limits of classical physics for: absorbance spectroscopy, lab-on-chip interferometry and process tomography (revealing an unknown quantum process with fewer measurements and fewer probe photons).

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 1725657
    Partners: University of London

    This PhD project aims to explore business to business innovation, exploring how suppliers and customers can accelerate innovation to market in the business environment. It focuses on the management science behind innovation and how this is applied in the construction sector at a business level. It touches upon a procurement as a stimulus for innovation through the contracting process across the supply chain. Of particular interest is capturing good practices across businesses and lessons learnt. This research will examine processes of encouraging, stimulating and applying innovation from other sectors.

  • Project . 2015 - 2020
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2307467
    Partners: QUB

    The aim of this project is design two implants systems that can communicate with each other through a wireless scheme.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: ST/N000315/1
    Funder Contribution: 380,394 GBP
    Partners: Durham University

    The successful interpretation of data from modern high-energy particle physics experiments is a complex process involving not only the actual measurement but also the input of a variety of theoretical or phenomenological models and processes, which, of course, rely on previous data. The HEPData project at the IPPP Durham will continue to compile HEP Experimental scattering data from particle physics experiments around the world and make these freely and openly available. It will keep these data easily accessible and thus promote them to a wider audience. The data in HEPData allow, among others, the planning and interpretation of new measurements and the re-interpretation of older data in light of new findings, precision tests of theoretical models and the extraction of fundamental parameters or their limits, and the tuning and validation of simulation tools. Through a better integration with Inspire, the central publication database of particle physics, HEPData will provide a vastly improved persistent open-access repository of published data, serving as the living memory of particle physics. HEPData will eventually become a formal member of the emerging INSPIRE collaboration, which currently consists of CERN, DESY, SLAC, FERMILAB and IHEP in China, and will thus represent the UK particle physics community in one aspect of the global data preservation strategy in particle physics. One of the effects of this integration is that valuable time of the trained physicist managing HEPData will be freed for central and important aspects of data curation, for further developments and for a broadening of the scope of HEPData. This will include extending the abilities of the new HEPdata-Inspire framework with respect to the old HEPData database, for instance by allowing the inclusion of supporting material that has not been part of the journal publication, by allowing cross linking with essential analysis software, thus providing a more integrated vision for data persistence, and by adding other modes and formats for data submission by the experimenters. In addition, we plan to broaden the scope of HEPData, to incorporate also data from particle decays or low-energy or astro-particle experiments, and to include also data relevant for the construction of detector simulation. Providing a repository for such data will also be useful for other fields of science, such as material science, space science, or medical physics. HEPDATA will also continue to provide a server for Parton Distribution Function (PDF) codes and maintain and improve facilities for plotting them. It will take part in developing and maintaining LHAPDF, the new library of PDFs for use in current and future analyses.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 113051
    Funder Contribution: 1,507,970 GBP
    Partners: Phoenix Scientific Industries (U K) Ltd

    TiPOW is an initiative by a consortium of leading UK companies proposing to define the requirements and develop the processing techniques to provide high quality Titanium powder; enabling the production of aerospace components via 3D printing or Additive Manufacturing (AM). AM is a revolutionary manufacturing technology with the potential to enable the production of highly complex lightweight aircraft and aero-engine parts using advanced production systems that in some cases print parts layer by layer from metal powders. The advanced components produced by AM can be up to 50% lighter than conventional components; constructed using completely new and novel designs, resulting in substantial weight reduction and increased efficiency & performance. GKN, global Tier 1 supplier for the Aerospace and Automotive industries has partnered with Metalysis, PSI and the University of Leeds for this project; each bringing a wealth of experience and background managing technology collaborations.

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