search
161,745 Projects

  • UK Research and Innovation

  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: MR/P024335/2
    Funder Contribution: 76,020 GBP

    Vast numbers of poor people in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) depend on healthy ecosystems for their livelihoods and food security. In India, around 300 million people depend on forests that are badly degraded by human settlement, agricultural expansion, and over-grazing. When they access food, fuel, fodder and other products from degraded forests, these people risk exposure to harmful pathogens that circulate naturally in wildlife. The ecological balance between diverse wildlife and arthropod vector communities can be altered by forest degradation, but these ecological changes interact with the priorities and behaviour of people in the landscape to determine when and where exposure occurs. Upsurges in human cases of zoonotic diseases (diseases that circulate between animals and humans) in LMICs, like malaria and Leishmaniases, have been linked to deforestation, reforestation or particular forest activities. Knowledge gaps on the role of ecology and sociology in underpinning these changes prevents development of intelligent disease control strategies that allow people to benefit from forests but minimise exposure to disease. Such strategies require cooperation of policy-makers and forest users from across the animal health, human health and forestry sectors, from national and international decision-makers down to village communities, that all interact with the disease system. By bringing such stakeholders together in a network, along with experts in public and animal health, ecology, epidemiology and social science, this project aims to develop a new inter-disciplinary framework and decision-support tool to reduce health, welfare and livelihood impacts of zoonotic diseases on people that depend on forests in LMICs. It will be developed initially for Kyasanur Forest Disease (KFD), a fatal haemorrhagic disease of forest populations in India that cycles naturally amongst ticks, rodents and primates. The research underpinning the tool will include: 1. Mapping of key stakeholders in each sector, their knowledge, needs for decision-support tools and how they are impacted by or impact upon the disease system. 2. Intensive field observation of (i) how the priorities, behaviour and perceptions of disease risk of different forest groups, like traditional hunter-gatherer tribes and farmers, change; (ii) how the numbers and species of wildlife hosts and tick vectors, and the consequent hazard of KFD changes along forest landscape gradients from closed through fragmented to open forest. 3. Matching of historical geographical patterns in human cases of KFD with environmental patterns within models to disentangle social, climate and forest landscape drivers across the affected region in India. A geographical decision support tool, integrating this knowledge, will map how disease risk varies across forest landscapes, from which activities and by which forest user groups, with other constraints on disease management, availability and access to health care and medicines. The project will reduce impacts of KFD on health, welfare and livelihoods by increasing awareness of disease risk in forest users, especially tribal groups that harvest non-timber forest products and farmers that graze livestock. These groups will further benefit from specific guidance on (i) the key forest locations and habitats, seasons and activities, and (ii) why and how to access medicine and other protective measures. The decision-support tool will help disease managers to better target vaccination and risk communication efforts towards the forest communities that are most at risk and will inform planning of land use in forests. The project platform and approach of co-developing research and decision support tools on zoonotic diseases with stakeholders across sectors, accounting for their needs and underlying ecological and social processes, will build significant capacity in science, policy and practitioners to respond to emerging global threats.

    visibility17
    visibilityviews17
    downloaddownloads7
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/S017860/1
    Funder Contribution: 175,000 GBP

    Cardiff University will use EPSRC's Capital Award to purchase equipment that enhances the research environments of early career researchers (ECR) and supports their transition into the next generation of researchers. The funding will be allocated via an internal call with each proposal being led by an ECR that meets the criteria set out in the EPSRC's call document. Such equipment will contribute towards the development of World Class Labs and will enhance the overall research capacity of ECRs and the broader academic community. The Award will also be used to promote a culture of collaboration and equipment sharing between ECRs and the broader academic community.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/F007426/1
    Funder Contribution: 3,148,360 GBP

    The first phase of the SUE Programme has focused necessarily on the present, assessing current solutions and their application in the near future, thus providing a strong empirical base on which to build. There now exist both the need and a sufficient body of work to extrapolate the findings to establish and test alternative urban futures: to create a variety of scenarios, building on prior and new work, and predicated on different fundamental assumptions and priorities; to assess those scenarios in terms of design, engineering implementation and measurement of performance; to refine them, in terms of mitigation and adaptation measures, incorporating novel solutions; and ultimately to provide alternative solutions with an associated evidence base and strategies for their implementation. This bid seeks to integrate the outputs of three current SUE consortia (Birmingham Eastside, VivaCity 2020 and WaND) and complementary research on the use of trees to mitigate the effects of atmospheric pollution. The team will work across disciplines to envision and establish alternative futures (using extensive literature on this subject and prior WaND consortium work) and construct scenarios that might flow from each alternative future. The various work packages will then focus on testing specific dimensions of each alternative future vis a vis their design, implementation and performance in the context of case history sites. Each project will engage an expert panel of influential stakeholders who will meet six-monthly to test and help shape new ideas, the chairs of each of the expert panels forming the higher level project steering committee. Panel consultation will be followed by interviews of stakeholders on motivations and the decision-making process, and specific empirical research and modelling. The following high level questions will be addressed via this process: - How does the ab initio conceptualization of sustainability influence design outcomes (e.g. form, density)? How would outcomes change if urban renewal were predicated on either environmental or social or economic overriding drivers? - How does development impact on its environs, and vice versa (e.g. is a 'sustainable' site good for the city / region / country and, if so, in what ways?) and is there an optimum development size to yield optimally sustainable outcomes? - Push versus pull to achieve sustainable outcomes. Much of what is done is thought good (for individuals, society, the environment), what might be wanted (push). Thus decisions are made and people must decide whether or not to take ownership. Might more sustainable outcomes follow if those who must take ownership dictate what is created (pull)? Birmingham Eastside will be used both to develop sustainability ideas and to test them on sites at various stages of planning and development (the research team has unparalleled access via its partnerships with key stakeholders involved in Eastside). Lancaster (with Morecambe, population 96k) and Worcester (94k) will be used to test the outcomes at the scale of smaller urban areas (e.g. market towns) but no attempt will be made to build comprehensive databases as at Eastside. Several other UK and international urban areas (including Sao Paulo, Singapore and an urban area in India) will be used to test a sub-set of the project's findings to assess the transferability of the scenarios to a variety of contexts and thus their general applicability.

    visibility4
    visibilityviews4
    downloaddownloads13
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/W004291/1
    Funder Contribution: 398,801 GBP

    In 2019 48.5% of the 32 GW daily average energy demand in the UK was carbon-free - contributed by wind farms, solar and nuclear energy, alongside energy imported by subsea interconnectors and biomass. This trend supports the "net zero" commitment signed by the government in 2019. However, significant technologies still need to be developed to enable this goal. One key such technology is high voltage direct current (HVDC) grid level transmission which will enable the "supergrid". This is a network of long distance power transmission lines across and between countries and those aforementioned energy production facilities, particularly in remote locations such as offshore wind farms. Increasing the efficiency and power rating of each grid interconnection (as well as reducing their volume and weight) it would mean more widespread implementation and hence better energy security, lower carbon footprint and better energy economy for the UK. Within most interconnectors, 50% of the volume is the power electronics devices, traditionally made from Silicon technology. Silicon Carbide (SiC) has clear advantages over current Silicon technology such as high temperature and higher frequency operation, with lower resultant system weight and volume. Recently, commercially available SiC power devices have recently entered the market with force, predicted to be worth $2bn by 2024, with rapid growth in this technology is being actively driven by a number of early adopters in the automotive sector, e.g. Tesla. However for high voltage (>1.7 kV) power transmission, bipolar Silicon devices (IGBTs, GTOs) are more efficient - so the technology must presently be chosen relative to application. To remove this restriction, SiC power devices of all types can be additionally bolstered by SuperJunction (SJ) technology, improving the efficiencies of the material and fully ready to challenge Si technology. This proposal intends on developing new 6.5 kV SiC SJ materials and devices technology for the goal of increased power transmission. Current research in SiC SJ devices consists only of a handful of reports on single devices, whilst encouraging, the technology is still in its infancy. The UK has an opportunity to develop the technology from the ground up and become a serious international name. The major challenge being that SiC processing methods fall short of being able to mass-produce the superjunction material, with one method being expensive and complicated, another requiring very tight precision of parameters and the last compromising on current rating. Specifically here we propose to develop Trench Epitaxy (TE), which deposits crystalline materials in very high aspect ratio micro trenches. The deposition method is chemical vapour deposition (CVD), which is accepted as the industry gold standard of fast throughput, high quality materials production and so must be the method of choice when developing this technology. The challenges in developing TE lie in the transport of the gases to the bottom of the trenches to a) etch the material, b) condition it ready for deposition and c) fully refilling the trenches with modified material and d) ensuring the surface is returned to its previous state. The more complex challenges lie in the non-mutually exclusive chemical nature of the work, where a change in one parameter may change many more. Warwick currently houses the only industrial SiC CVD in the UK, has a dedicated SiC device fabrication cleanroom and many analytical tools so is the ideal place for the UK to enter this field with the view to contributing to the technology at the point of entry. The University of Warwick is a key member of EPSRC Centre for Power Electronics and is part of the £17M APC-12 ESCAPE (End-to-end Supply Chain development for Automotive Power Electronics) project which is developing a UK centred SiC production line, led by McLaren, so pathways exist of fully implementing TE SiC SJ technology after development.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: G9901264
    Funder Contribution: 1,489,940 GBP

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: BB/V509784/1
    Funder Contribution: 102,026 GBP

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at https://www.ukri.org/apply-for-funding/how-we-fund-studentships/. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/G024979/1
    Funder Contribution: 358,962 GBP

    This proposal is concerned primarily with Diophantine equations in two variables, i.e., polynomial relations with integers coefficients for which one seeks to understand the collection of integer solutions. The history of such investigations reaches back to the tradition of Greek mathematics, while the twentieth century has seen spectacular applications of abstract modern machinery to the resolution of difficult old questions, such as Wiles' proof of Fermat's last theorem. The investigator proposes a new approach to studying these classical problems by incorporating fundamental ideas of topology and geometry that go beyond the principal developments of the twentieth century in that the relevant structures are, in the main, non-commutative and non-linear. An eventual goal is to construct methods for effectively resolving Diophantine equations in two-variables.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: MR/R024987/2
    Funder Contribution: 133,902 GBP

    What is this project about? Our DNA is a collection of instructions for how a living being functions and develops. All the cells in our body have the same DNA sequence, but not all the cells are the same. For example, a brain cell has a very different structure, appearance and function to a skin or heart cell. So what makes the cells different? The way the DNA is used by the cells is similar to how a musician reads a music sheet; the DNA is like the sequence of musical notes. However, in a music sheet there are also instructions for the dynamics and rhythm of the music. In a similar way, there are mechanisms that decide which parts of the DNA are used by the cell; these are broadly called the epigenome of a cell. During early stages of development of a new organism, the epigenome is very important in determining the cell type of each cell in the adult organism. In this project I will identify changes in these mechanisms in different cell types across the early development of a new organism. Why is this important? The early development of a new human is a very vulnerable process. Errors during this time can increase the risk of someone developing a disease later in life. This includes mental health diseases such as schizophrenia. Researchers have been studying the mechanisms that regulate human development for a long time. However, to this day no one has described the epigenome of the different cell types during early stages of development. As a consequence, we still do not completely understand how the different cell types are generated and how errors during this process result in diseases. My project will help us to: 1) Understand how humans develop; 2) Determine how our different organs are generated; 3) Identify regions of the genome that can be used in the treatment of certain diseases, such as schizophrenia; 4) Understand how the different cell types are determined; 5) Identify regions of the genome that are more vulnerable during early development. How will I do this? During early stages of development, the new developing organism is called an embryo. Studying human embryos is a complicated process, which is limited by ethical restrictions. To study human development researchers often rely on animal models that have similarities with humans. In this project I will use zebrafish embryos. An obvious limitation of using zebrafish is that fish are not humans. However, the zebrafish embryo is surprisingly similar to other animals in the same group (vertebrates), such as mice or humans. In addition, the zebrafish DNA sequence is around 70% similar to humans. The zebrafish embryos develop outside of the mothers' bodies and are transparent. This characteristic makes it easy to see what happens to the embryos during development. Zebrafish are also cheap and easy to keep as an animal model. We can grow a large number of embryos in a very short time. Firstly, I will extract different cell types from zebrafish embryos at different stages of early development. I will then extract the DNA from these cells and use advanced laboratory methods to read the epigenome of these cells. To generate results, I will use powerful computer programs and software. To identify regions of the DNA that can be used in the treatment of mental health diseases, I will partner with the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly. I will compare DNA regions that are very important in development with regions that are involved in mental health disorders. The DNA regions in common to both processes can be investigated as targets for new medication. Eli Lily experts will teach me the best methods to generate the results of this project. In return, these results will inform them of possible drug targets for these diseases. By the end of this project we will have a greater insight into the mechanisms that regulate human development. We will identify target regions that can be used to create new medication for mental health diseases.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: 752752
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP

    Bridgwater College

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: 10030966

    This KTP will embed expertise that will allow us to create software that interacts with sensors, allowing us to monitor our hardware assets remotely. This will allow us to deliver 24hr care and diagnose faults, minimizing disruption to our customer's business.

    more_vert
161,745 Projects
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: MR/P024335/2
    Funder Contribution: 76,020 GBP

    Vast numbers of poor people in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) depend on healthy ecosystems for their livelihoods and food security. In India, around 300 million people depend on forests that are badly degraded by human settlement, agricultural expansion, and over-grazing. When they access food, fuel, fodder and other products from degraded forests, these people risk exposure to harmful pathogens that circulate naturally in wildlife. The ecological balance between diverse wildlife and arthropod vector communities can be altered by forest degradation, but these ecological changes interact with the priorities and behaviour of people in the landscape to determine when and where exposure occurs. Upsurges in human cases of zoonotic diseases (diseases that circulate between animals and humans) in LMICs, like malaria and Leishmaniases, have been linked to deforestation, reforestation or particular forest activities. Knowledge gaps on the role of ecology and sociology in underpinning these changes prevents development of intelligent disease control strategies that allow people to benefit from forests but minimise exposure to disease. Such strategies require cooperation of policy-makers and forest users from across the animal health, human health and forestry sectors, from national and international decision-makers down to village communities, that all interact with the disease system. By bringing such stakeholders together in a network, along with experts in public and animal health, ecology, epidemiology and social science, this project aims to develop a new inter-disciplinary framework and decision-support tool to reduce health, welfare and livelihood impacts of zoonotic diseases on people that depend on forests in LMICs. It will be developed initially for Kyasanur Forest Disease (KFD), a fatal haemorrhagic disease of forest populations in India that cycles naturally amongst ticks, rodents and primates. The research underpinning the tool will include: 1. Mapping of key stakeholders in each sector, their knowledge, needs for decision-support tools and how they are impacted by or impact upon the disease system. 2. Intensive field observation of (i) how the priorities, behaviour and perceptions of disease risk of different forest groups, like traditional hunter-gatherer tribes and farmers, change; (ii) how the numbers and species of wildlife hosts and tick vectors, and the consequent hazard of KFD changes along forest landscape gradients from closed through fragmented to open forest. 3. Matching of historical geographical patterns in human cases of KFD with environmental patterns within models to disentangle social, climate and forest landscape drivers across the affected region in India. A geographical decision support tool, integrating this knowledge, will map how disease risk varies across forest landscapes, from which activities and by which forest user groups, with other constraints on disease management, availability and access to health care and medicines. The project will reduce impacts of KFD on health, welfare and livelihoods by increasing awareness of disease risk in forest users, especially tribal groups that harvest non-timber forest products and farmers that graze livestock. These groups will further benefit from specific guidance on (i) the key forest locations and habitats, seasons and activities, and (ii) why and how to access medicine and other protective measures. The decision-support tool will help disease managers to better target vaccination and risk communication efforts towards the forest communities that are most at risk and will inform planning of land use in forests. The project platform and approach of co-developing research and decision support tools on zoonotic diseases with stakeholders across sectors, accounting for their needs and underlying ecological and social processes, will build significant capacity in science, policy and practitioners to respond to emerging global threats.

    visibility17
    visibilityviews17
    downloaddownloads7
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/S017860/1
    Funder Contribution: 175,000 GBP

    Cardiff University will use EPSRC's Capital Award to purchase equipment that enhances the research environments of early career researchers (ECR) and supports their transition into the next generation of researchers. The funding will be allocated via an internal call with each proposal being led by an ECR that meets the criteria set out in the EPSRC's call document. Such equipment will contribute towards the development of World Class Labs and will enhance the overall research capacity of ECRs and the broader academic community. The Award will also be used to promote a culture of collaboration and equipment sharing between ECRs and the broader academic community.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/F007426/1
    Funder Contribution: 3,148,360 GBP

    The first phase of the SUE Programme has focused necessarily on the present, assessing current solutions and their application in the near future, thus providing a strong empirical base on which to build. There now exist both the need and a sufficient body of work to extrapolate the findings to establish and test alternative urban futures: to create a variety of scenarios, building on prior and new work, and predicated on different fundamental assumptions and priorities; to assess those scenarios in terms of design, engineering implementation and measurement of performance; to refine them, in terms of mitigation and adaptation measures, incorporating novel solutions; and ultimately to provide alternative solutions with an associated evidence base and strategies for their implementation. This bid seeks to integrate the outputs of three current SUE consortia (Birmingham Eastside, VivaCity 2020 and WaND) and complementary research on the use of trees to mitigate the effects of atmospheric pollution. The team will work across disciplines to envision and establish alternative futures (using extensive literature on this subject and prior WaND consortium work) and construct scenarios that might flow from each alternative future. The various work packages will then focus on testing specific dimensions of each alternative future vis a vis their design, implementation and performance in the context of case history sites. Each project will engage an expert panel of influential stakeholders who will meet six-monthly to test and help shape new ideas, the chairs of each of the expert panels forming the higher level project steering committee. Panel consultation will be followed by interviews of stakeholders on motivations and the decision-making process, and specific empirical research and modelling. The following high level questions will be addressed via this process: - How does the ab initio conceptualization of sustainability influence design outcomes (e.g. form, density)? How would outcomes change if urban renewal were predicated on either environmental or social or economic overriding drivers? - How does development impact on its environs, and vice versa (e.g. is a 'sustainable' site good for the city / region / country and, if so, in what ways?) and is there an optimum development size to yield optimally sustainable outcomes? - Push versus pull to achieve sustainable outcomes. Much of what is done is thought good (for individuals, society, the environment), what might be wanted (push). Thus decisions are made and people must decide whether or not to take ownership. Might more sustainable outcomes follow if those who must take ownership dictate what is created (pull)? Birmingham Eastside will be used both to develop sustainability ideas and to test them on sites at various stages of planning and development (the research team has unparalleled access via its partnerships with key stakeholders involved in Eastside). Lancaster (with Morecambe, population 96k) and Worcester (94k) will be used to test the outcomes at the scale of smaller urban areas (e.g. market towns) but no attempt will be made to build comprehensive databases as at Eastside. Several other UK and international urban areas (including Sao Paulo, Singapore and an urban area in India) will be used to test a sub-set of the project's findings to assess the transferability of the scenarios to a variety of contexts and thus their general applicability.

    visibility4
    visibilityviews4
    downloaddownloads13
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/W004291/1
    Funder Contribution: 398,801 GBP

    In 2019 48.5% of the 32 GW daily average energy demand in the UK was carbon-free - contributed by wind farms, solar and nuclear energy, alongside energy imported by subsea interconnectors and biomass. This trend supports the "net zero" commitment signed by the government in 2019. However, significant technologies still need to be developed to enable this goal. One key such technology is high voltage direct current (HVDC) grid level transmission which will enable the "supergrid". This is a network of long distance power transmission lines across and between countries and those aforementioned energy production facilities, particularly in remote locations such as offshore wind farms. Increasing the efficiency and power rating of each grid interconnection (as well as reducing their volume and weight) it would mean more widespread implementation and hence better energy security, lower carbon footprint and better energy economy for the UK. Within most interconnectors, 50% of the volume is the power electronics devices, traditionally made from Silicon technology. Silicon Carbide (SiC) has clear advantages over current Silicon technology such as high temperature and higher frequency operation, with lower resultant system weight and volume. Recently, commercially available SiC power devices have recently entered the market with force, predicted to be worth $2bn by 2024, with rapid growth in this technology is being actively driven by a number of early adopters in the automotive sector, e.g. Tesla. However for high voltage (>1.7 kV) power transmission, bipolar Silicon devices (IGBTs, GTOs) are more efficient - so the technology must presently be chosen relative to application. To remove this restriction, SiC power devices of all types can be additionally bolstered by SuperJunction (SJ) technology, improving the efficiencies of the material and fully ready to challenge Si technology. This proposal intends on developing new 6.5 kV SiC SJ materials and devices technology for the goal of increased power transmission. Current research in SiC SJ devices consists only of a handful of reports on single devices, whilst encouraging, the technology is still in its infancy. The UK has an opportunity to develop the technology from the ground up and become a serious international name. The major challenge being that SiC processing methods fall short of being able to mass-produce the superjunction material, with one method being expensive and complicated, another requiring very tight precision of parameters and the last compromising on current rating. Specifically here we propose to develop Trench Epitaxy (TE), which deposits crystalline materials in very high aspect ratio micro trenches. The deposition method is chemical vapour deposition (CVD), which is accepted as the industry gold standard of fast throughput, high quality materials production and so must be the method of choice when developing this technology. The challenges in developing TE lie in the transport of the gases to the bottom of the trenches to a) etch the material, b) condition it ready for deposition and c) fully refilling the trenches with modified material and d) ensuring the surface is returned to its previous state. The more complex challenges lie in the non-mutually exclusive chemical nature of the work, where a change in one parameter may change many more. Warwick currently houses the only industrial SiC CVD in the UK, has a dedicated SiC device fabrication cleanroom and many analytical tools so is the ideal place for the UK to enter this field with the view to contributing to the technology at the point of entry. The University of Warwick is a key member of EPSRC Centre for Power Electronics and is part of the £17M APC-12 ESCAPE (End-to-end Supply Chain development for Automotive Power Electronics) project which is developing a UK centred SiC production line, led by McLaren, so pathways exist of fully implementing TE SiC SJ technology after development.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: G9901264
    Funder Contribution: 1,489,940 GBP

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: BB/V509784/1
    Funder Contribution: 102,026 GBP

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at https://www.ukri.org/apply-for-funding/how-we-fund-studentships/. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: EP/G024979/1
    Funder Contribution: 358,962 GBP

    This proposal is concerned primarily with Diophantine equations in two variables, i.e., polynomial relations with integers coefficients for which one seeks to understand the collection of integer solutions. The history of such investigations reaches back to the tradition of Greek mathematics, while the twentieth century has seen spectacular applications of abstract modern machinery to the resolution of difficult old questions, such as Wiles' proof of Fermat's last theorem. The investigator proposes a new approach to studying these classical problems by incorporating fundamental ideas of topology and geometry that go beyond the principal developments of the twentieth century in that the relevant structures are, in the main, non-commutative and non-linear. An eventual goal is to construct methods for effectively resolving Diophantine equations in two-variables.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: MR/R024987/2
    Funder Contribution: 133,902 GBP

    What is this project about? Our DNA is a collection of instructions for how a living being functions and develops. All the cells in our body have the same DNA sequence, but not all the cells are the same. For example, a brain cell has a very different structure, appearance and function to a skin or heart cell. So what makes the cells different? The way the DNA is used by the cells is similar to how a musician reads a music sheet; the DNA is like the sequence of musical notes. However, in a music sheet there are also instructions for the dynamics and rhythm of the music. In a similar way, there are mechanisms that decide which parts of the DNA are used by the cell; these are broadly called the epigenome of a cell. During early stages of development of a new organism, the epigenome is very important in determining the cell type of each cell in the adult organism. In this project I will identify changes in these mechanisms in different cell types across the early development of a new organism. Why is this important? The early development of a new human is a very vulnerable process. Errors during this time can increase the risk of someone developing a disease later in life. This includes mental health diseases such as schizophrenia. Researchers have been studying the mechanisms that regulate human development for a long time. However, to this day no one has described the epigenome of the different cell types during early stages of development. As a consequence, we still do not completely understand how the different cell types are generated and how errors during this process result in diseases. My project will help us to: 1) Understand how humans develop; 2) Determine how our different organs are generated; 3) Identify regions of the genome that can be used in the treatment of certain diseases, such as schizophrenia; 4) Understand how the different cell types are determined; 5) Identify regions of the genome that are more vulnerable during early development. How will I do this? During early stages of development, the new developing organism is called an embryo. Studying human embryos is a complicated process, which is limited by ethical restrictions. To study human development researchers often rely on animal models that have similarities with humans. In this project I will use zebrafish embryos. An obvious limitation of using zebrafish is that fish are not humans. However, the zebrafish embryo is surprisingly similar to other animals in the same group (vertebrates), such as mice or humans. In addition, the zebrafish DNA sequence is around 70% similar to humans. The zebrafish embryos develop outside of the mothers' bodies and are transparent. This characteristic makes it easy to see what happens to the embryos during development. Zebrafish are also cheap and easy to keep as an animal model. We can grow a large number of embryos in a very short time. Firstly, I will extract different cell types from zebrafish embryos at different stages of early development. I will then extract the DNA from these cells and use advanced laboratory methods to read the epigenome of these cells. To generate results, I will use powerful computer programs and software. To identify regions of the DNA that can be used in the treatment of mental health diseases, I will partner with the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly. I will compare DNA regions that are very important in development with regions that are involved in mental health disorders. The DNA regions in common to both processes can be investigated as targets for new medication. Eli Lily experts will teach me the best methods to generate the results of this project. In return, these results will inform them of possible drug targets for these diseases. By the end of this project we will have a greater insight into the mechanisms that regulate human development. We will identify target regions that can be used to create new medication for mental health diseases.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: 752752
    Funder Contribution: 5,000 GBP

    Bridgwater College

    more_vert
  • Funder: UK Research and Innovation Project Code: 10030966

    This KTP will embed expertise that will allow us to create software that interacts with sensors, allowing us to monitor our hardware assets remotely. This will allow us to deliver 24hr care and diagnose faults, minimizing disruption to our customer's business.

    more_vert