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40 Research products, page 1 of 4

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  • 2018-2022
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  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leavy, Susan; Meaney, Gerardine; Wade, Karen; Greene, Derek;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    International Workshop on Algorithmic Bias in Search and Recommendation (Bias 2020), Lisbon, Portugal (held online due to coronavirus outbreak) 14 April 2020 Algorithmic bias has the capacity to amplify and perpetuate societal bias, and presents profound ethical implications for society. Gender bias in algorithms has been identified in the context of employment advertising and recruitment tools, due to their reliance on underlying language processing and recommendation algorithms. Attempts to address such issues have involved testing learned associations, integrating concepts of fairness to machine learning, and performing more rigorous analysis of training data. Mitigating bias when algorithms are trained on textual data is particularly challenging given the complex way gender ideology is embedded in language. This paper proposes a framework for the identification of gender bias in training data for machine learning. The work draws upon gender theory and sociolinguistics to systematically indicate levels of bias in textual training data and associated neural word embedding models, thus highlighting pathways for both removing bias from training data and critically assessing its impact in the context of search and recommender systems. Irish Research Council Science Foundation Ireland

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school have successfully completed up to the Winter period of 2019. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school across our (3) three campuses have successfully completed up to the Autumn period of 2022. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sweeney, Moira;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This practice-based thesis responds to the absence of documentary film or photographic studies and scholarship that embrace the contrasting experiences of different dock working constituencies in the transforming early twenty-first century space of Dublin Port. It is a filmic investigation into how the experiences and memories of this community of workers in Dublin’s surviving port space shape their urban identity and sense of place, undertaken with regard to the sensuous, haptic qualities of documentary and ethnographic filmmaking. In the ever-shifting world of neoliberalism, its narratives – in relation to labour practices – prioritise faceless markets over the humanity of working life. Therefore, in an attempt to interrogate the lived experiences and memories of working life and how these are central to the shaping of identity, the research is framed within the context of contrasting constituencies within the port community – dockers, crane drivers, stevedores, marine operatives and port managers.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Garry, Mark;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This thesis will enable a retrospective critical examination of aspects of my practice as an artist from 2005 - 2020. The research question addresses the implication of multiple forms of inter-reliance enabled in the practice. This will be enabled by opening a discursive space that retrospectively, integrates and critically examines the role and function of inter-reliance as a structural methodology and how this is implicated in the practice over this period. This thesis will use term inter-reliance to define a play of relations where individual art works when viewed in isolation exist only in partial illumination as a form of penumbra. The art works are inchoate as separate entities only becoming activated or fully realised when engaged with collectively and interdiscursively, as a set of enabled relationships. In each of the chapters inter-reliance is manifested as a set of specific enabled reciprocal relationships between artistic mechanisms and physical, perceptual, associative, sonic, contextual and cinematic space. Rather than make art for art’s sake or art that specifically engages with trends or tendencies within the art world, it will elucidate how the practice is relational and empathetic, facilitating an inter-reliance between artist and viewer and artist and society, the practice engages with and reflects upon broader society where articulations of ideological positions are subtly embedded.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eschenfelder, Kristin R.; Shankar, Kalpana;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    iConference 2019, Washington, United States of America, March 31- 3 April 2019 We investigate how the term “business model" was used in the digital cultural heritage literature from 2000 to 2015 through content analysis. We found that discussion of business models is not prevalent and there is no observable growth trend. Analysis of how authors represented business models showed predominately positive uses of the concept but include discussion of tension between the concept of business model and traditional cultural heritage field values. We found that non- element representations of business models were most common. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

  • Other research product . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Warren, Graeme; McDermott, Conor; Seaver, Matthew;
    Publisher: Irish Quaternary Association
    Country: Ireland

    The 20th INQUA Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 25-31 July 2019 Glendalough is one of Ireland’s most iconic landscapes, combining stunning scenery with evocative ruined architecture, including distinctively Irish styles such as the round tower. The popular understanding of the valley’s history is that Saint Kevin retreated into the wilderness where he could be closer to God, and that there he founded his monastery which rose to a position of pre-dominance before subsequent decline. This is a powerful story, appealing to important myths about the nature of early Irish Christianity and with a complex relationship with Irish cultural nationalism. However, it is only a partial understanding of the long-term history of how humans have settled the spectacular valley of Glendalough. Glendalough is also often viewed as a natural landscape, but its form is an outcome of the long-term interaction between people and their environment. This brief outline, and fieldtrip, offers a more holistic perspective on this remarkable landscape. Wicklow County Council

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Soro, Tommie;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The bases of artistic reputation have been widely debated within the sociology of art and art history. Remarkably, however, little has been said of the role discourse might play in the construction of artistic reputation. An obstacle to addressing this research gap is that discourse analytic approaches have been developed to analyse evaluation and the construction of legitimacy but not the construction of reputation. Attending first to this research gap in discourse analysis, the thesis combines Field Theory and Discourse Analysis to develop a Discursive Field Approach that can analyse the discursive construction of reputation in a cultural field. Using this approach, the thesis attends to the research gap in the literature on artistic reputation by addressing the research question: How is reputation constructed through discourse in the field of online contemporary art magazines? This breaks down into the following sub questions: How do OCAMs acquire the capacity to discursively construct reputation? How is the discursive construction of reputation by OCAMs regulated? How is reputation linguistically constructed by OCAMs? How do OCAMs propose the value of different symbolic resources within the artworld? And, how do internal and external structures in the field of OCAMs affect OCAMs’ construction of reputation? This thesis proposes that online contemporary art magazines acquire the capacity to construct reputation through the possession of key symbolic resources and their use of communication technologies, that their construction of reputation is regulated by field-specific norms, that they linguistically construct reputation through performative statements and supporting linguistic devices, and that the opposition between cultural and commercial discursive practices in the field of online contemporary art magazines comes to bear on the value of different symbolic resources in the artworld and the artworld’s relationships to legitimating fields.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wang, Fei;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    First Story Detection (FSD) is an important application of online novelty detection within Natural Language Processing (NLP). Given a stream of documents, or stories, about news events in a chronological order, the goal of FSD is to identify the very first story for each event. While a variety of NLP techniques have been applied to the task, FSD remains challenging because it is still not clear what is the most crucial factor in defining the “story novelty”. Giventhesechallenges,thethesisaddressedinthisdissertationisthat the notion of novelty in FSD is multi-dimensional. To address this, the work presented has adopted a three dimensional analysis of the relative qualities of FSD systems and gone on to propose a specific method that wearguesignificantlyimprovesunderstandingandperformanceofFSD. FSD is of course not a new problem type; therefore, our first dimen sion of analysis consists of a systematic study of detection models for firststorydetectionandthedistancesthatareusedinthedetectionmod els for defining novelty. This analysis presents a tripartite categorisa tion of the detection models based on the end points of the distance calculation. The study also considers issues of document representation explicitly, and shows that even in a world driven by distributed repres iv entations,thenearestneighbourdetectionmodelwithTF-IDFdocument representations still achieves the state-of-the-art performance for FSD. Weprovideanalysisofthisimportantresultandsuggestpotentialcauses and consequences. Events are introduced and change at a relatively slow rate relative to the frequency at which words come in and out of usage on a docu ment by document basis. Therefore we argue that the second dimen sion of analysis should focus on the temporal aspects of FSD. Here we are concerned with not only the temporal nature of the detection pro cess, e.g., the time/history window over the stories in the data stream, but also the processes that underpin the representational updates that underpin FSD. Through a systematic investigation of static representa tions, and also dynamic representations with both low and high update frequencies, we show that while a dynamic model unsurprisingly out performs static models, the dynamic model in fact stops improving but stays steady when the update frequency gets higher than a threshold. Our third dimension of analysis moves across to the particulars of lexicalcontent,andcriticallytheaffectoftermsinthedefinitionofstory novelty. Weprovideaspecificanalysisofhowtermsarerepresentedfor FSD, including the distinction between static and dynamic document representations, and the affect of out-of-vocabulary terms and the spe cificity of a word in the calculation of the distance. Our investigation showed that term distributional similarity rather than scale of common v terms across the background and target corpora is the most important factor in selecting background corpora for document representations in FSD. More crucially, in this work the simple idea of the new terms emerged as a vital factor in defining novelty for the first story.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    McCague, Clare;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This study examines the European pedal harp tradition in Ireland in the period c.1790-1900. Steered by collections of nineteenth-century pedal harp repertoire, and hinged on data extracted from newspaper archives, it addresses a lacuna in harp-focused scholarship, by illuminating the significance of the pedal harp tradition in nineteenth-century Irish musical life and reviving nineteenth-century pedal harp repertoire of Irish interest. The evolution of the pedal harp tradition in Ireland was influenced by multiple personalities. Foreign pedal harpists, including Nicholas Charles Bochsa (1789-1856), Charles Oberthür (1819-1895) and Aptommas (1829-1913), had a significant impact on the tradition and travelled regularly to Ireland to perform and to teach. Irish pedal harpists with a public profile, including the Ashe sisters (prior to 1850) and Glover sisters (after 1850), tended to be from established musical families. Central to the survival of the pedal harp tradition in Ireland was an amateur pedal harp community from which the demand for teaching, instruments and sheet music emanated. In the early decades of the nineteenth century, pedal harp tuition was taught privately, on a one-to-one basis or in educational facilities for ladies. In the second half of the century, access to tuition was ameliorated through convent schools and the Royal Irish Academy of Music. Over the course of the nineteenth century, demand for pedal harps and sheet music in Ireland was met by a reactive Irish music trade. Pedal harps were sold privately, by practising harpists or in music shops, and appeared in auctions of household furniture. The indigenous manufacture of pedal harps in Ireland was, for the most part, a phenomenon of the period 1800-1850 and was controlled by the Egan family of Dublin. This study establishes that Boleyne Reeves (1820-1905) was the most successful Irish pedal harpist of the nineteenth century. Born in Cork, Reeves was the only Irish composer, harpist or otherwise, who contributed what have been termed ‘original’ works to the canon of nineteenth-century pedal harp repertoire. A wider repertoire study, enriched by RISM cataloguing, establishes the existence of a body of nineteenth-century pedal harp works ‘of Irish significance’. These include arrangements, variations and fantasias based on ancient Irish melodies, particularly those popularised by Irish poet and lyricist Thomas Moore (1779-1852). Representative recordings of repertoire of Irish significance, including four compositions by Reeves, are an integrated component of this study and breathe life into a genre of pedal harp repertoire that is hitherto unaccounted for in contemporary harp scholarship.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
40 Research products, page 1 of 4
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leavy, Susan; Meaney, Gerardine; Wade, Karen; Greene, Derek;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    International Workshop on Algorithmic Bias in Search and Recommendation (Bias 2020), Lisbon, Portugal (held online due to coronavirus outbreak) 14 April 2020 Algorithmic bias has the capacity to amplify and perpetuate societal bias, and presents profound ethical implications for society. Gender bias in algorithms has been identified in the context of employment advertising and recruitment tools, due to their reliance on underlying language processing and recommendation algorithms. Attempts to address such issues have involved testing learned associations, integrating concepts of fairness to machine learning, and performing more rigorous analysis of training data. Mitigating bias when algorithms are trained on textual data is particularly challenging given the complex way gender ideology is embedded in language. This paper proposes a framework for the identification of gender bias in training data for machine learning. The work draws upon gender theory and sociolinguistics to systematically indicate levels of bias in textual training data and associated neural word embedding models, thus highlighting pathways for both removing bias from training data and critically assessing its impact in the context of search and recommender systems. Irish Research Council Science Foundation Ireland

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school have successfully completed up to the Winter period of 2019. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school across our (3) three campuses have successfully completed up to the Autumn period of 2022. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sweeney, Moira;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This practice-based thesis responds to the absence of documentary film or photographic studies and scholarship that embrace the contrasting experiences of different dock working constituencies in the transforming early twenty-first century space of Dublin Port. It is a filmic investigation into how the experiences and memories of this community of workers in Dublin’s surviving port space shape their urban identity and sense of place, undertaken with regard to the sensuous, haptic qualities of documentary and ethnographic filmmaking. In the ever-shifting world of neoliberalism, its narratives – in relation to labour practices – prioritise faceless markets over the humanity of working life. Therefore, in an attempt to interrogate the lived experiences and memories of working life and how these are central to the shaping of identity, the research is framed within the context of contrasting constituencies within the port community – dockers, crane drivers, stevedores, marine operatives and port managers.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Garry, Mark;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This thesis will enable a retrospective critical examination of aspects of my practice as an artist from 2005 - 2020. The research question addresses the implication of multiple forms of inter-reliance enabled in the practice. This will be enabled by opening a discursive space that retrospectively, integrates and critically examines the role and function of inter-reliance as a structural methodology and how this is implicated in the practice over this period. This thesis will use term inter-reliance to define a play of relations where individual art works when viewed in isolation exist only in partial illumination as a form of penumbra. The art works are inchoate as separate entities only becoming activated or fully realised when engaged with collectively and interdiscursively, as a set of enabled relationships. In each of the chapters inter-reliance is manifested as a set of specific enabled reciprocal relationships between artistic mechanisms and physical, perceptual, associative, sonic, contextual and cinematic space. Rather than make art for art’s sake or art that specifically engages with trends or tendencies within the art world, it will elucidate how the practice is relational and empathetic, facilitating an inter-reliance between artist and viewer and artist and society, the practice engages with and reflects upon broader society where articulations of ideological positions are subtly embedded.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eschenfelder, Kristin R.; Shankar, Kalpana;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    iConference 2019, Washington, United States of America, March 31- 3 April 2019 We investigate how the term “business model" was used in the digital cultural heritage literature from 2000 to 2015 through content analysis. We found that discussion of business models is not prevalent and there is no observable growth trend. Analysis of how authors represented business models showed predominately positive uses of the concept but include discussion of tension between the concept of business model and traditional cultural heritage field values. We found that non- element representations of business models were most common. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

  • Other research product . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Warren, Graeme; McDermott, Conor; Seaver, Matthew;
    Publisher: Irish Quaternary Association
    Country: Ireland

    The 20th INQUA Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 25-31 July 2019 Glendalough is one of Ireland’s most iconic landscapes, combining stunning scenery with evocative ruined architecture, including distinctively Irish styles such as the round tower. The popular understanding of the valley’s history is that Saint Kevin retreated into the wilderness where he could be closer to God, and that there he founded his monastery which rose to a position of pre-dominance before subsequent decline. This is a powerful story, appealing to important myths about the nature of early Irish Christianity and with a complex relationship with Irish cultural nationalism. However, it is only a partial understanding of the long-term history of how humans have settled the spectacular valley of Glendalough. Glendalough is also often viewed as a natural landscape, but its form is an outcome of the long-term interaction between people and their environment. This brief outline, and fieldtrip, offers a more holistic perspective on this remarkable landscape. Wicklow County Council

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Soro, Tommie;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The bases of artistic reputation have been widely debated within the sociology of art and art history. Remarkably, however, little has been said of the role discourse might play in the construction of artistic reputation. An obstacle to addressing this research gap is that discourse analytic approaches have been developed to analyse evaluation and the construction of legitimacy but not the construction of reputation. Attending first to this research gap in discourse analysis, the thesis combines Field Theory and Discourse Analysis to develop a Discursive Field Approach that can analyse the discursive construction of reputation in a cultural field. Using this approach, the thesis attends to the research gap in the literature on artistic reputation by addressing the research question: How is reputation constructed through discourse in the field of online contemporary art magazines? This breaks down into the following sub questions: How do OCAMs acquire the capacity to discursively construct reputation? How is the discursive construction of reputation by OCAMs regulated? How is reputation linguistically constructed by OCAMs? How do OCAMs propose the value of different symbolic resources within the artworld? And, how do internal and external structures in the field of OCAMs affect OCAMs’ construction of reputation? This thesis proposes that online contemporary art magazines acquire the capacity to construct reputation through the possession of key symbolic resources and their use of communication technologies, that their construction of reputation is regulated by field-specific norms, that they linguistically construct reputation through performative statements and supporting linguistic devices, and that the opposition between cultural and commercial discursive practices in the field of online contemporary art magazines comes to bear on the value of different symbolic resources in the artworld and the artworld’s relationships to legitimating fields.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wang, Fei;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    First Story Detection (FSD) is an important application of online novelty detection within Natural Language Processing (NLP). Given a stream of documents, or stories, about news events in a chronological order, the goal of FSD is to identify the very first story for each event. While a variety of NLP techniques have been applied to the task, FSD remains challenging because it is still not clear what is the most crucial factor in defining the “story novelty”. Giventhesechallenges,thethesisaddressedinthisdissertationisthat the notion of novelty in FSD is multi-dimensional. To address this, the work presented has adopted a three dimensional analysis of the relative qualities of FSD systems and gone on to propose a specific method that wearguesignificantlyimprovesunderstandingandperformanceofFSD. FSD is of course not a new problem type; therefore, our first dimen sion of analysis consists of a systematic study of detection models for firststorydetectionandthedistancesthatareusedinthedetectionmod els for defining novelty. This analysis presents a tripartite categorisa tion of the detection models based on the end points of the distance calculation. The study also considers issues of document representation explicitly, and shows that even in a world driven by distributed repres iv entations,thenearestneighbourdetectionmodelwithTF-IDFdocument representations still achieves the state-of-the-art performance for FSD. Weprovideanalysisofthisimportantresultandsuggestpotentialcauses and consequences. Events are introduced and change at a relatively slow rate relative to the frequency at which words come in and out of usage on a docu ment by document basis. Therefore we argue that the second dimen sion of analysis should focus on the temporal aspects of FSD. Here we are concerned with not only the temporal nature of the detection pro cess, e.g., the time/history window over the stories in the data stream, but also the processes that underpin the representational updates that underpin FSD. Through a systematic investigation of static representa tions, and also dynamic representations with both low and high update frequencies, we show that while a dynamic model unsurprisingly out performs static models, the dynamic model in fact stops improving but stays steady when the update frequency gets higher than a threshold. Our third dimension of analysis moves across to the particulars of lexicalcontent,andcriticallytheaffectoftermsinthedefinitionofstory novelty. Weprovideaspecificanalysisofhowtermsarerepresentedfor FSD, including the distinction between static and dynamic document representations, and the affect of out-of-vocabulary terms and the spe cificity of a word in the calculation of the distance. Our investigation showed that term distributional similarity rather than scale of common v terms across the background and target corpora is the most important factor in selecting background corpora for document representations in FSD. More crucially, in this work the simple idea of the new terms emerged as a vital factor in defining novelty for the first story.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    McCague, Clare;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This study examines the European pedal harp tradition in Ireland in the period c.1790-1900. Steered by collections of nineteenth-century pedal harp repertoire, and hinged on data extracted from newspaper archives, it addresses a lacuna in harp-focused scholarship, by illuminating the significance of the pedal harp tradition in nineteenth-century Irish musical life and reviving nineteenth-century pedal harp repertoire of Irish interest. The evolution of the pedal harp tradition in Ireland was influenced by multiple personalities. Foreign pedal harpists, including Nicholas Charles Bochsa (1789-1856), Charles Oberthür (1819-1895) and Aptommas (1829-1913), had a significant impact on the tradition and travelled regularly to Ireland to perform and to teach. Irish pedal harpists with a public profile, including the Ashe sisters (prior to 1850) and Glover sisters (after 1850), tended to be from established musical families. Central to the survival of the pedal harp tradition in Ireland was an amateur pedal harp community from which the demand for teaching, instruments and sheet music emanated. In the early decades of the nineteenth century, pedal harp tuition was taught privately, on a one-to-one basis or in educational facilities for ladies. In the second half of the century, access to tuition was ameliorated through convent schools and the Royal Irish Academy of Music. Over the course of the nineteenth century, demand for pedal harps and sheet music in Ireland was met by a reactive Irish music trade. Pedal harps were sold privately, by practising harpists or in music shops, and appeared in auctions of household furniture. The indigenous manufacture of pedal harps in Ireland was, for the most part, a phenomenon of the period 1800-1850 and was controlled by the Egan family of Dublin. This study establishes that Boleyne Reeves (1820-1905) was the most successful Irish pedal harpist of the nineteenth century. Born in Cork, Reeves was the only Irish composer, harpist or otherwise, who contributed what have been termed ‘original’ works to the canon of nineteenth-century pedal harp repertoire. A wider repertoire study, enriched by RISM cataloguing, establishes the existence of a body of nineteenth-century pedal harp works ‘of Irish significance’. These include arrangements, variations and fantasias based on ancient Irish melodies, particularly those popularised by Irish poet and lyricist Thomas Moore (1779-1852). Representative recordings of repertoire of Irish significance, including four compositions by Reeves, are an integrated component of this study and breathe life into a genre of pedal harp repertoire that is hitherto unaccounted for in contemporary harp scholarship.

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