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  • Publication . Conference object . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    GulwaniSumit; RadičekIvan; ZulegerFlorian;

    Providing feedback on programming assignments is a tedious task for the instructor, and even impossible in large Massive Open Online Courses with thousands of students. Previous research has suggested that program repair techniques can be used to generate feedback in programming education. In this paper, we present a novel fully automated program repair algorithm for introductory programming assignments. The key idea of the technique, which enables automation and scalability, is to use the existing correct student solutions to repair the incorrect attempts. We evaluate the approach in two experiments: (I) We evaluate the number, size and quality of the generated repairs on 4,293 incorrect student attempts from an existing MOOC. We find that our approach can repair 97% of student attempts, while 81% of those are small repairs of good quality. (II) We conduct a preliminary user study on performance and repair usefulness in an interactive teaching setting. We obtain promising initial results (the average usefulness grade 3.4 on a scale from 1 to 5), and conclude that our approach can be used in an interactive setting. Extended version of the PLDI paper of the same name

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alexander Meschtscherjakov; Manfred Tscheligi; Bastian Pfleging; Shadan Sadeghian Borojeni; Wendy Ju; Philippe Palanque; Andreas Riener; Bilge Mutlu; Andrew L. Kun;
    Publisher: ACM : Association for Computing Machinery
    Country: France

    The rise of evermore autonomy in vehicles and the expected introduction of self-driving cars have led to a focus on human interactions with such systems from an HCI perspective over the last years. Automotive User Interface researchers have been investigating issues such as transition control procedures, shared control, (over)trust, and overall user experience in automated vehicles. Now, it is time to open the research field of automated driving to other CHI research fields, such as Human-Robot-Interaction (HRI), aeronautics and space, conversational agents, or smart devices. These communities have been dealing with the interplay between humans and automated systems for more than 30 years. In this workshop, we aim to provide a forum to discuss what can be learnt from other domains for the design of autonomous vehicles. Interaction design problems that occur in these domains, such as transition control procedures, how to build trust in the system, and ethics will be discussed.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Suominen, H.; Kelly, L.; Goeuriot, L.; Névéol, A.; Ramadier, L.; Robert, A.; Kanoulas, E.; Spijker, R.; Azzopardi, L.; Li, D.; +12 more
    Countries: Netherlands, Ireland

    In this paper, we provide an overview of the sixth annual edition of the CLEF eHealth evaluation lab. CLEF eHealth 2018 continues our evaluation resource building efforts around the easing and support of patients, their next-of-kins, clinical staff, and health scientists in understanding, accessing, and authoring eHealth information in a multilingual setting. This year’s lab offered three tasks: Task 1 on multilingual information extraction to extend from last year’s task on French and English corpora to French, Hungarian, and Italian; Task 2 on technologically assisted reviews in empirical medicine building on last year’s pilot task in English; and Task 3 on Consumer Health Search (CHS) in mono- and multilingual settings that builds on the 2013–17 Information Retrieval tasks. In total 28 teams took part in these tasks (14 in Task 1, 7 in Task 2 and 7 in Task 3). Herein, we describe the resources created for these tasks, outline our evaluation methodology adopted and provide a brief summary of participants of this year’s challenges and results obtained. As in previous years, the organizers have made data and tools associated with the lab tasks available for future research and development.

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Moser, Daniel; Abele, Hartmut; Bosina, Joachim; Fillunger, Harald; Soldner, Torsten; Wang, Xiangzun; Zmeskal, Johann; Konrad, Gertrud;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: FWF | Particles and Interaction... (W 1252)

    The beta decay of the free neutron provides several probes to test the Standard Model of particle physics as well as to search for extensions thereof. Hence, multiple experiments investigating the decay have already been performed, are under way or are being prepared. These measure the mean lifetime, angular correlation coefficients or various spectra of the charged decay products (proton and electron). NoMoS, the Neutron decay prOducts MOmentum Spectrometer, presents a novel method of momentum spectroscopy: it utilizes the $R \times B$ drift effect to disperse charged particles dependent on their momentum in an uniformly curved magnetic field. This spectrometer is designed to precisely measure momentum spectra and angular correlation coefficients in free neutron beta decay to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics beyond. With NoMoS, we aim to measure inter alia the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient $a$ and the Fierz interference term $b$ with an ultimate precision of $\Delta a/a < 0.3\%$ and $\Delta b < 10^{-3}$ respectively. In this paper, we present the measurement principles, discuss measurement uncertainties and systematics, and give a status update. Comment: 7 pages, 4 figures, accepted to the Proceedings of the International Workshop on Particle Physics at Neutron Sources PPNS 2018, Grenoble, France, May 24-26, 2018

  • English
    Authors: 
    Lassnigg, Lorenz; Vogtenhuber, Stefan;
    Country: Austria
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Enzinger, Robert Josef; Luckabauer, Martin; Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Würschum, Roland; Ionescu, Mihail; Sommitsch, Christof; Poletti, Cecilia; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Chandra, Tara;
    Publisher: Trans Tech Publications Ltd
    Country: Netherlands

    In the most relevant technical β-titanium alloys, the extensive formation of the metastable ω-phase during common heat treatments has been a long-standing problem due to the deteriorating effect of this phase on the material properties. By means of dilatometry, the formation of the isothermal ω-phase has been investigated during ageing a Ti-21at.-%V-sample at 300 °C. A model has been developed, which allows to quantitatively correlate the maximum length changes appearing upon ageing to changes occurring at the microscopic scale, i.e. variations of the lattice constants, phase fractions and concentrations of vanadium in the phases appearing. The length change predicted by the model is in very good accordance with the data measured paving the way for further kinetic discussion and ultimately for deriving kinetic parameters.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martin Holzhauer; Rolf Szedlak; Hermann Detz; Robert Weih; Sven Höfling; Werner Schrenk; Johannes Koeth; Gottfried Strasser;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The authors acknowledge the support by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) projects P26100-N27 (H2N) and NextLite (F4909-N23), and the State of Bavaria. HD acknowledges financial support through an APART fellowship from the Austrian Academy of Sciences. We demonstrate interband cascade lasers fabricated into ring-shaped cavities with vertical light emission through the substrate at a wavelength of λ ≈ 3.7 µm. The out-coupling mechanism is based on a metallized second-order distributed feedback grating. At room-temperature, a pulsed threshold current-density of 0.75 kA/cm2 and a temperature-tuning rate of 0.3 nm/°C is measured. In contrast to the azimuthal polarization of ring quantum cascade lasers, we observe a radial polarization of the projected nearfield of ring interband cascade lasers. These findings underline the fundamental physical difference between light generation in interband and intersubband cascade lasers, offering new perspectives for device integration. Publisher PDF Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Conference object . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 28 Feb 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Korhonen, Janne H.; Nikabadi, Amir;
    Publisher: Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum f��r Informatik
    Project: ANR | Avenir L.S.E. (ANR-11-IDEX-0007), EC | ScaleML (805223), ANR | MILYON (ANR-10-LABX-0070)

    Subgraph detection has recently been one of the most studied problems in the CONGEST model of distributed computing. In this work, we study the distributed complexity of problems closely related to subgraph detection, mainly focusing on induced subgraph detection. The main line of this work presents lower bounds and parameterized algorithms w.r.t structural parameters of the input graph: - On general graphs, we give unconditional lower bounds for induced detection of cycles and patterns of treewidth 2 in CONGEST. Moreover, by adapting reductions from centralized parameterized complexity, we prove lower bounds in CONGEST for detecting patterns with a 4-clique, and for induced path detection conditional on the hardness of triangle detection in the congested clique. - On graphs of bounded degeneracy, we show that induced paths can be detected fast in CONGEST using techniques from parameterized algorithms, while detecting cycles and patterns of treewidth 2 is hard. - On graphs of bounded vertex cover number, we show that induced subgraph detection is easy in CONGEST for any pattern graph. More specifically, we adapt a centralized parameterized algorithm for a more general maximum common induced subgraph detection problem to the distributed setting. In addition to these induced subgraph detection results, we study various related problems in the CONGEST and congested clique models, including for multicolored versions of subgraph-detection-like problems. LIPIcs, Vol. 217, 25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021), pages 15:1-15:18

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mrkajic, V.; Vukasovic, S.; Batič, M.; d'Andrimont, R.; Moorthy, I.;
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | LANDSENSE (689812)
  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mrkajić, Vladimir; Nicin, Nemanja; Batič, Matej; Gold, Margaret; Woods, Tim; Moorthy, Inian; See, Linda; Fritz, Steffen;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | LANDSENSE (689812)

    The LandSense project aims to build an innovative citizen observatory for Land Use & Land Cover (LULC) monitoring, by connecting citizens with Earth Observation (EO) data to transform current approaches to environmental decision making. Through EO-driven mobile and web applications, LandSense promotes citizens to not only play a key role in environmental monitoring, but also to be directly involved in the co-creation of such applications. Currently within the EU’s EO monitoring framework, especially in the domain of LULC dynamics, there is a need for low-cost methods for acquiring high quality in-situ data to create timely, accurate and well-validated data products. LandSense aims to disrupt the EO data economy by creating marketable solutions that can provide a step-change in LULC monitoring activities both within and beyond Europe. In order to promote and stimulate the fast adoption of the project outcomes, the consortium proposes organization of the LandSense Innovation Challenge: Finals at the ECSA Conference 2020. This interactive session would facilitate collaboration and innovation among stakeholders within the value chain related to land mapping and citizen science. As such, the LandSense Innovation Challenge targets individuals, web-entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs coming from all participating Horizon 2020 countries, to present innovative IT solutions addressing one of the three LandSense domains: Urban Landscape Dynamics, Agricultural Land Use, and Forest & Habitat Monitoring. The challenge focuses on exploiting data streams coming from the LandSense Citizen Observatory, which consist of a diverse set of data including land cover change detection, threats to natural habitats, greenspace monitoring, etc., to design novel LULC solutions targeted at the citizen science community. In addition, participants will be encouraged to access data from the Sentinel Hub Service or other relevant EO data sources as well as the LandSense Quality Assurance Service in their solution. The process for the LandSense Innovation Challenge will be divided into two stages. First, there will be public call for ideas (Feb/March 2020) to which teams can submit proposals. After a review of the applications, a select number of shortlisted teams (5 to 10) will be invited to join the finals in Trieste to pitch their ideas to a jury of experts. Teams attending the finals will have the opportunity to discover more about LandSense, get coaching/mentoring to improve their pitches and network with the vibrant EO and citizen science communities. The winning team will not only receive a grand prize but also continue collaboration with the LandSense consortium to further advance their solution.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
1,965 Research products, page 1 of 197
  • Publication . Conference object . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    GulwaniSumit; RadičekIvan; ZulegerFlorian;

    Providing feedback on programming assignments is a tedious task for the instructor, and even impossible in large Massive Open Online Courses with thousands of students. Previous research has suggested that program repair techniques can be used to generate feedback in programming education. In this paper, we present a novel fully automated program repair algorithm for introductory programming assignments. The key idea of the technique, which enables automation and scalability, is to use the existing correct student solutions to repair the incorrect attempts. We evaluate the approach in two experiments: (I) We evaluate the number, size and quality of the generated repairs on 4,293 incorrect student attempts from an existing MOOC. We find that our approach can repair 97% of student attempts, while 81% of those are small repairs of good quality. (II) We conduct a preliminary user study on performance and repair usefulness in an interactive teaching setting. We obtain promising initial results (the average usefulness grade 3.4 on a scale from 1 to 5), and conclude that our approach can be used in an interactive setting. Extended version of the PLDI paper of the same name

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alexander Meschtscherjakov; Manfred Tscheligi; Bastian Pfleging; Shadan Sadeghian Borojeni; Wendy Ju; Philippe Palanque; Andreas Riener; Bilge Mutlu; Andrew L. Kun;
    Publisher: ACM : Association for Computing Machinery
    Country: France

    The rise of evermore autonomy in vehicles and the expected introduction of self-driving cars have led to a focus on human interactions with such systems from an HCI perspective over the last years. Automotive User Interface researchers have been investigating issues such as transition control procedures, shared control, (over)trust, and overall user experience in automated vehicles. Now, it is time to open the research field of automated driving to other CHI research fields, such as Human-Robot-Interaction (HRI), aeronautics and space, conversational agents, or smart devices. These communities have been dealing with the interplay between humans and automated systems for more than 30 years. In this workshop, we aim to provide a forum to discuss what can be learnt from other domains for the design of autonomous vehicles. Interaction design problems that occur in these domains, such as transition control procedures, how to build trust in the system, and ethics will be discussed.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Suominen, H.; Kelly, L.; Goeuriot, L.; Névéol, A.; Ramadier, L.; Robert, A.; Kanoulas, E.; Spijker, R.; Azzopardi, L.; Li, D.; +12 more
    Countries: Netherlands, Ireland

    In this paper, we provide an overview of the sixth annual edition of the CLEF eHealth evaluation lab. CLEF eHealth 2018 continues our evaluation resource building efforts around the easing and support of patients, their next-of-kins, clinical staff, and health scientists in understanding, accessing, and authoring eHealth information in a multilingual setting. This year’s lab offered three tasks: Task 1 on multilingual information extraction to extend from last year’s task on French and English corpora to French, Hungarian, and Italian; Task 2 on technologically assisted reviews in empirical medicine building on last year’s pilot task in English; and Task 3 on Consumer Health Search (CHS) in mono- and multilingual settings that builds on the 2013–17 Information Retrieval tasks. In total 28 teams took part in these tasks (14 in Task 1, 7 in Task 2 and 7 in Task 3). Herein, we describe the resources created for these tasks, outline our evaluation methodology adopted and provide a brief summary of participants of this year’s challenges and results obtained. As in previous years, the organizers have made data and tools associated with the lab tasks available for future research and development.

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . Conference object . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Moser, Daniel; Abele, Hartmut; Bosina, Joachim; Fillunger, Harald; Soldner, Torsten; Wang, Xiangzun; Zmeskal, Johann; Konrad, Gertrud;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: FWF | Particles and Interaction... (W 1252)

    The beta decay of the free neutron provides several probes to test the Standard Model of particle physics as well as to search for extensions thereof. Hence, multiple experiments investigating the decay have already been performed, are under way or are being prepared. These measure the mean lifetime, angular correlation coefficients or various spectra of the charged decay products (proton and electron). NoMoS, the Neutron decay prOducts MOmentum Spectrometer, presents a novel method of momentum spectroscopy: it utilizes the $R \times B$ drift effect to disperse charged particles dependent on their momentum in an uniformly curved magnetic field. This spectrometer is designed to precisely measure momentum spectra and angular correlation coefficients in free neutron beta decay to test the Standard Model and to search for new physics beyond. With NoMoS, we aim to measure inter alia the electron-antineutrino correlation coefficient $a$ and the Fierz interference term $b$ with an ultimate precision of $\Delta a/a < 0.3\%$ and $\Delta b < 10^{-3}$ respectively. In this paper, we present the measurement principles, discuss measurement uncertainties and systematics, and give a status update. Comment: 7 pages, 4 figures, accepted to the Proceedings of the International Workshop on Particle Physics at Neutron Sources PPNS 2018, Grenoble, France, May 24-26, 2018

  • English
    Authors: 
    Lassnigg, Lorenz; Vogtenhuber, Stefan;
    Country: Austria
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Enzinger, Robert Josef; Luckabauer, Martin; Ichitsubo, Tetsu; Würschum, Roland; Ionescu, Mihail; Sommitsch, Christof; Poletti, Cecilia; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Chandra, Tara;
    Publisher: Trans Tech Publications Ltd
    Country: Netherlands

    In the most relevant technical β-titanium alloys, the extensive formation of the metastable ω-phase during common heat treatments has been a long-standing problem due to the deteriorating effect of this phase on the material properties. By means of dilatometry, the formation of the isothermal ω-phase has been investigated during ageing a Ti-21at.-%V-sample at 300 °C. A model has been developed, which allows to quantitatively correlate the maximum length changes appearing upon ageing to changes occurring at the microscopic scale, i.e. variations of the lattice constants, phase fractions and concentrations of vanadium in the phases appearing. The length change predicted by the model is in very good accordance with the data measured paving the way for further kinetic discussion and ultimately for deriving kinetic parameters.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2017
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martin Holzhauer; Rolf Szedlak; Hermann Detz; Robert Weih; Sven Höfling; Werner Schrenk; Johannes Koeth; Gottfried Strasser;
    Country: United Kingdom

    The authors acknowledge the support by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF) projects P26100-N27 (H2N) and NextLite (F4909-N23), and the State of Bavaria. HD acknowledges financial support through an APART fellowship from the Austrian Academy of Sciences. We demonstrate interband cascade lasers fabricated into ring-shaped cavities with vertical light emission through the substrate at a wavelength of λ ≈ 3.7 µm. The out-coupling mechanism is based on a metallized second-order distributed feedback grating. At room-temperature, a pulsed threshold current-density of 0.75 kA/cm2 and a temperature-tuning rate of 0.3 nm/°C is measured. In contrast to the azimuthal polarization of ring quantum cascade lasers, we observe a radial polarization of the projected nearfield of ring interband cascade lasers. These findings underline the fundamental physical difference between light generation in interband and intersubband cascade lasers, offering new perspectives for device integration. Publisher PDF Peer reviewed

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Conference object . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 28 Feb 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Korhonen, Janne H.; Nikabadi, Amir;
    Publisher: Schloss Dagstuhl - Leibniz-Zentrum f��r Informatik
    Project: ANR | Avenir L.S.E. (ANR-11-IDEX-0007), EC | ScaleML (805223), ANR | MILYON (ANR-10-LABX-0070)

    Subgraph detection has recently been one of the most studied problems in the CONGEST model of distributed computing. In this work, we study the distributed complexity of problems closely related to subgraph detection, mainly focusing on induced subgraph detection. The main line of this work presents lower bounds and parameterized algorithms w.r.t structural parameters of the input graph: - On general graphs, we give unconditional lower bounds for induced detection of cycles and patterns of treewidth 2 in CONGEST. Moreover, by adapting reductions from centralized parameterized complexity, we prove lower bounds in CONGEST for detecting patterns with a 4-clique, and for induced path detection conditional on the hardness of triangle detection in the congested clique. - On graphs of bounded degeneracy, we show that induced paths can be detected fast in CONGEST using techniques from parameterized algorithms, while detecting cycles and patterns of treewidth 2 is hard. - On graphs of bounded vertex cover number, we show that induced subgraph detection is easy in CONGEST for any pattern graph. More specifically, we adapt a centralized parameterized algorithm for a more general maximum common induced subgraph detection problem to the distributed setting. In addition to these induced subgraph detection results, we study various related problems in the CONGEST and congested clique models, including for multicolored versions of subgraph-detection-like problems. LIPIcs, Vol. 217, 25th International Conference on Principles of Distributed Systems (OPODIS 2021), pages 15:1-15:18

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mrkajic, V.; Vukasovic, S.; Batič, M.; d'Andrimont, R.; Moorthy, I.;
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | LANDSENSE (689812)
  • Publication . Conference object . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mrkajić, Vladimir; Nicin, Nemanja; Batič, Matej; Gold, Margaret; Woods, Tim; Moorthy, Inian; See, Linda; Fritz, Steffen;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | LANDSENSE (689812)

    The LandSense project aims to build an innovative citizen observatory for Land Use & Land Cover (LULC) monitoring, by connecting citizens with Earth Observation (EO) data to transform current approaches to environmental decision making. Through EO-driven mobile and web applications, LandSense promotes citizens to not only play a key role in environmental monitoring, but also to be directly involved in the co-creation of such applications. Currently within the EU’s EO monitoring framework, especially in the domain of LULC dynamics, there is a need for low-cost methods for acquiring high quality in-situ data to create timely, accurate and well-validated data products. LandSense aims to disrupt the EO data economy by creating marketable solutions that can provide a step-change in LULC monitoring activities both within and beyond Europe. In order to promote and stimulate the fast adoption of the project outcomes, the consortium proposes organization of the LandSense Innovation Challenge: Finals at the ECSA Conference 2020. This interactive session would facilitate collaboration and innovation among stakeholders within the value chain related to land mapping and citizen science. As such, the LandSense Innovation Challenge targets individuals, web-entrepreneurs, start-ups and SMEs coming from all participating Horizon 2020 countries, to present innovative IT solutions addressing one of the three LandSense domains: Urban Landscape Dynamics, Agricultural Land Use, and Forest & Habitat Monitoring. The challenge focuses on exploiting data streams coming from the LandSense Citizen Observatory, which consist of a diverse set of data including land cover change detection, threats to natural habitats, greenspace monitoring, etc., to design novel LULC solutions targeted at the citizen science community. In addition, participants will be encouraged to access data from the Sentinel Hub Service or other relevant EO data sources as well as the LandSense Quality Assurance Service in their solution. The process for the LandSense Innovation Challenge will be divided into two stages. First, there will be public call for ideas (Feb/March 2020) to which teams can submit proposals. After a review of the applications, a select number of shortlisted teams (5 to 10) will be invited to join the finals in Trieste to pitch their ideas to a jury of experts. Teams attending the finals will have the opportunity to discover more about LandSense, get coaching/mentoring to improve their pitches and network with the vibrant EO and citizen science communities. The winning team will not only receive a grand prize but also continue collaboration with the LandSense consortium to further advance their solution.

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