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  • 2013-2022
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  • Digital Classics Online
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  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Manuel Abbt; Gerlinde Bigga; Kevin Körner; Matthias Lang; Fabian Schwabe; Dieta Frauke Svoboda;
    Publisher: University Library Heidelberg

    At the end of the 19th century, the orientalist Julius Euting traveled several times to the Middle East to investigate and to record pre-Islamic monuments, artifacts, and inscriptions. His journals and sketchbooks are preserved in the University Library of Tübingen where they recently were completely digitized. The aim of the presented project is to connect these texts with additional sources and data in a common interface.[1]This system is based on the web-framework Neatline,developed at the University of Virginia, which is able to manage and visualize heterogeneous data in a common interface. The system was extended with a functionality to store and display XML-encoded texts according to the recommendations of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). Furthermore, every entry in the journals is connected to a date or a time-span displayed in a timeline which could also be used to access the text. Beyond this, it is possible to upload or to link scientific articles to monuments, artifacts or archaeological sites mentioned by Euting. All geographical information in the diary can be directly connected to different maps provided within the system. [1] http://ecenter.uni-tuebingen.de:8012/neatline/fullscreen/start

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Piraye Hacıgüzeller;
    Publisher: Universität Leipzig - Lehrstuhl für Alte Geschichte
    Country: Belgium

    Over the past decade, collaborative mapping projects have become widespread, allowing for and promoting voluntary participation in cartographic processes. A major factor in the increasing popularity of collaborative mapping in recent years has been the developments in digital cartographic media in general and internet mapping in particular. In this paper the aim is to discuss the possibilities of online collaborative mapping in archaeology. Following an overview of collaborative mapping and its current state in today‘s increasingly online and digital world, four potential modes are introduced through which collaborative mapping in archaeology can be carried out: psychogeography, local community involvement, an online archaeology map system and spatial narratives. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kristina Neumann; John Wallrodt;
    Publisher: Digital Classics Online

    This article presents one digital approach to ancient numismatics. The proposed methodology maps geo-referenced quantities of coin finds within the platform of Google Earth – a free virtual globe available through the Internet. Especially for the uninitiated scholar, Google Earth efficiently visualizes both the spatial and chronological distribution of thousands of coins and provides an intuitive and interactive space for exploring regional and empire-wide patterns in their movement. While the practical applications of this methodology are many, this article focuses on an ongoing study of Antioch-on-the-Orontes in northern Syria and its regional evolution after Roman annexation. This project draws upon Google Earth as an invaluable first step in synthesizing the wealth of disparate coin data available for the city. After outlining the methodology to achieve such a visualization, this article highlights several promising patterns revealed by Google Earth in the dataset. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,3 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christopher William Blackwell;
    Publisher: Digital Classics Online

    In 2016 and 2017, a series of conferences for European philologists was organized around the question, “What digital services, collections or curricula need to be developed so that a field of study can flourish in a digital society?” This paper argues for the need to cite graphs of data with machine-actionable canonical citation, independently of the data organized by a graph. It describes ongoing work to implement a “Canonical Graph Service” into the CITE/CTS framework used by the Homer Multitext (HMT). It describes citation of graphs, parts of graphs, and sub-graphs by URN, with some examples of how such URN citations might usefully be resolved. Finally, I discuss the limits of this approach, problems that will not be solved by a Canonical Graph Service. This approach may facilitate the creation of generic tools for documenting syntax across languages, integrating data from diverse projects, and opening new areas of research to scholars outside of quantitative fields. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,3 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Matteo Romanello; Martina Trognitz; Undine Lieberwirth; Francesco Mambrini; Felix Schäfer;
    Publisher: Universität Leipzig - Lehrstuhl für Alte Geschichte

    Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017) -

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Elwert, Frederik; Simone Gerhards; Sellmer, Sven;
    Publisher: Prof. Dr. Charlotte Schubert, Prof. Dr. Reinhold Scholl, Dr. Roxana Kath, Dr. Michaela Rücker

    In this paper, the authors show the application and use of automated text network analysis based on ancient corpora. The examples draw from Ancient Egyptian sources and the Indian Mahābhārata. Different text-based network generation algorithms like “Nubbi” or “Textplot” are presented in order to showcase alternative methodological approaches. Visualizations of the generated networks will help scholars to grasp complex social and semantic text structures and serve as a starting point for new research questions. All tools for applying the methods to ancient corpora are available as open source software. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017)

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
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Include:
6 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Manuel Abbt; Gerlinde Bigga; Kevin Körner; Matthias Lang; Fabian Schwabe; Dieta Frauke Svoboda;
    Publisher: University Library Heidelberg

    At the end of the 19th century, the orientalist Julius Euting traveled several times to the Middle East to investigate and to record pre-Islamic monuments, artifacts, and inscriptions. His journals and sketchbooks are preserved in the University Library of Tübingen where they recently were completely digitized. The aim of the presented project is to connect these texts with additional sources and data in a common interface.[1]This system is based on the web-framework Neatline,developed at the University of Virginia, which is able to manage and visualize heterogeneous data in a common interface. The system was extended with a functionality to store and display XML-encoded texts according to the recommendations of the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). Furthermore, every entry in the journals is connected to a date or a time-span displayed in a timeline which could also be used to access the text. Beyond this, it is possible to upload or to link scientific articles to monuments, artifacts or archaeological sites mentioned by Euting. All geographical information in the diary can be directly connected to different maps provided within the system. [1] http://ecenter.uni-tuebingen.de:8012/neatline/fullscreen/start

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Piraye Hacıgüzeller;
    Publisher: Universität Leipzig - Lehrstuhl für Alte Geschichte
    Country: Belgium

    Over the past decade, collaborative mapping projects have become widespread, allowing for and promoting voluntary participation in cartographic processes. A major factor in the increasing popularity of collaborative mapping in recent years has been the developments in digital cartographic media in general and internet mapping in particular. In this paper the aim is to discuss the possibilities of online collaborative mapping in archaeology. Following an overview of collaborative mapping and its current state in today‘s increasingly online and digital world, four potential modes are introduced through which collaborative mapping in archaeology can be carried out: psychogeography, local community involvement, an online archaeology map system and spatial narratives. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kristina Neumann; John Wallrodt;
    Publisher: Digital Classics Online

    This article presents one digital approach to ancient numismatics. The proposed methodology maps geo-referenced quantities of coin finds within the platform of Google Earth – a free virtual globe available through the Internet. Especially for the uninitiated scholar, Google Earth efficiently visualizes both the spatial and chronological distribution of thousands of coins and provides an intuitive and interactive space for exploring regional and empire-wide patterns in their movement. While the practical applications of this methodology are many, this article focuses on an ongoing study of Antioch-on-the-Orontes in northern Syria and its regional evolution after Roman annexation. This project draws upon Google Earth as an invaluable first step in synthesizing the wealth of disparate coin data available for the city. After outlining the methodology to achieve such a visualization, this article highlights several promising patterns revealed by Google Earth in the dataset. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,3 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christopher William Blackwell;
    Publisher: Digital Classics Online

    In 2016 and 2017, a series of conferences for European philologists was organized around the question, “What digital services, collections or curricula need to be developed so that a field of study can flourish in a digital society?” This paper argues for the need to cite graphs of data with machine-actionable canonical citation, independently of the data organized by a graph. It describes ongoing work to implement a “Canonical Graph Service” into the CITE/CTS framework used by the Homer Multitext (HMT). It describes citation of graphs, parts of graphs, and sub-graphs by URN, with some examples of how such URN citations might usefully be resolved. Finally, I discuss the limits of this approach, problems that will not be solved by a Canonical Graph Service. This approach may facilitate the creation of generic tools for documenting syntax across languages, integrating data from diverse projects, and opening new areas of research to scholars outside of quantitative fields. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,3 (2017)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Matteo Romanello; Martina Trognitz; Undine Lieberwirth; Francesco Mambrini; Felix Schäfer;
    Publisher: Universität Leipzig - Lehrstuhl für Alte Geschichte

    Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017) -

  • Open Access German
    Authors: 
    Elwert, Frederik; Simone Gerhards; Sellmer, Sven;
    Publisher: Prof. Dr. Charlotte Schubert, Prof. Dr. Reinhold Scholl, Dr. Roxana Kath, Dr. Michaela Rücker

    In this paper, the authors show the application and use of automated text network analysis based on ancient corpora. The examples draw from Ancient Egyptian sources and the Indian Mahābhārata. Different text-based network generation algorithms like “Nubbi” or “Textplot” are presented in order to showcase alternative methodological approaches. Visualizations of the generated networks will help scholars to grasp complex social and semantic text structures and serve as a starting point for new research questions. All tools for applying the methods to ancient corpora are available as open source software. Digital Classics Online, Bd. 3,2 (2017)

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