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  • Part of book or chapter of book
  • CORE (RIOXX-UK Aggregator)

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  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2002
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jianhan Zhu; Jun Hong; John Hughes;
    Publisher: Springer

    The large number of Web pages on many Web sites has raised\ud navigational problems. Markov chains have recently been used to model user navigational behavior on the World Wide Web (WWW). In this paper, we propose a method for constructing a Markov model of a Web site based on past\ud visitor behavior. We use the Markov model to make link predictions that assist new users to navigate the Web site. An algorithm for transition probability\ud matrix compression has been used to cluster Web pages with similar transition behaviors and compress the transition matrix to an optimal size for efficient probability calculation in link prediction. A maximal forward path method is used to further improve the efficiency of link prediction. Link prediction has been implemented in an online system called ONE (Online Navigation Explorer) to assist users' navigation in the adaptive Web site.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ortiz Miranda, Dionisio; Marquez Climent, Judith; Moragues Faus, Ana;
    Publisher: Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 1993
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Keith, Michael; Pile, Steve;
    Publisher: Routledge
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2010
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tackley, Catherine;
    Publisher: Cambridge University Press

    Recent scholarship has tended to focus on the perceived inadequacies of recording to represent live jazz performance. Nevertheless, recordings are dominant in the dissemination of jazz and as such demand our critical attention to understand the social potential of jazz in the twenty-first century. This chapter examines the ability of recordings to influence perceptions of jazz when evaluated in different ways: firstly, retrospectively, for example when writing jazz history; secondly, historically, within their original context (that is at the time at which they were first disseminated); and thirdly, in their present context, when they are encountered by new audiences. In this chapter, these three particular temporal perspectives of listeners are explored in relation to recordings chosen deliberately for their quantifiable status in the jazz canon: ‘Livery Stable Blues’ (1917) recorded by the Original Dixieland Jazz Band from New Orleans is widely cited as the first jazz recording; Miles Davis’s album Kind of Blue (1959) is understood as the best selling and most popular jazz recording of all time.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2016
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Havemann, Leo;
    Publisher: Springer Singapore
    Country: United Kingdom

    Introduces the notion of OER and situates it within a wider open education movement, which has more recently seen a turn to the consideration of 'open educational practices'.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tomkins, Leah;
    Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

    In this chapter, I deepen the exploration of care and caring leadership as relationships of power. Connecting with care ethicists’ discussions of the interplay between care and justice, I probe some of the ways in which care can involve and inscribe injustice. This provides some scene-setting for the book as a whole, because many of the chapters engage both explicitly and implicitly\ud with the risk and/or reality of injustice, and how the dynamics of care can bring about advantage and disadvantage for both leaders and followers.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Julia Molinari;
    Publisher: The WAC Clearinghouse; University Press of Colorado

    Drawing on critical realism, complexity theory, and emergence, this chapter supports the call to re-imagine doctoral writing by arguing that academic writing in general is a complex open and emergent social system that can change. Several reasons to re-imagine doctoral writing are discussed. The first reason is that academic writings already exhibit considerable diversity. This suggests that the conditions of possibility for re-imagining them are already in place and provide a conceptual space from which to further imagine. Second, there are\ud epistemic reasons for re-thinking how we write, as evidenced by research on socio-semiotics. Several examples of doctoral writers\ud who have re-imagined their writing for epistemic reasons are given. To explain how change in social phenomena is possible and how it can continue to be justified, I draw on the theory of complex permeable open systems. These systems are emergent and, as such, allow us to think of social phenomena, such as writing, as non-reductive organic unities whose characteristics emerge from but cannot be reduced to any single constituent feature (such as grammar or lexis). By re-thinking academic writings in this way, we can provide a rationale to explain how they can continue to change. The chapter concludes by sharing the work of scholars engaged in re-imagining doctoral writings. The significance for writing studies is that critical realism offers a systematic and critical space within which to explain change\ud in social phenomena and provides a theoretical foundation for continuing to re-imagine conditions of possibility.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hultgren, Anna Kristina;
    Publisher: Mouton de Gruyter
  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Conference object . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lara S. G. Piccolo; Somya Joshi; Evangelos Karapanos; Tracie Farrell;
    Country: Cyprus

    Part 12: Workshops; International audience; The manipulation of information and the dissemination of “fake news” are practices that trace back to the early records of human history. Significant changes in the technological environment enabling ubiquity, immediacy and considerable anonymity, have facilitated the spreading of misinformation in unforeseen ways, raising concerns around people’s (mis)perception of social issues worldwide. As a wicked problem, limiting the harm caused by misinformation goes beyond technical solutions, requiring also regulatory and behavioural changes. This workshop proposes to unpack the challenge at hand by bringing together diverse perspectives to the problem. Based on participatory design principles, it will challenge participants to critically reflect the limits of existing socio-technical approaches and co-create scenarios in which digital platforms support misinformation resilience.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rosser, Siwan Meleri;
    Publisher: LeabhairCOMHAR

    The growth and range of material produced by the Welsh-language children’s book industry\ud over the past 100 years can be viewed as a barometer of national confidence in the face of\ud rapid social, cultural and linguistic change. In 1911, when census returns recorded that 43.5%\ud of the population were able to speak Welsh, 25 books were published for children (Cyngor\ud Llyfrau Cymru 1997: 15–18). A century later in 2011, the percentage of Welsh speakers is\ud estimated to be only 20% of the population; yet 21 books for children were published during\ud January alone. With the overall total of Welsh-language children’s books in print standing at\ud nearly 3,000 and significant investment seen in publishing and promotion (including\ud national book clubs, the annual Tir na n-Og prizes for children’s literature, and funding for a\ud children’s Welsh Poet Laureate), the children’s book industry in Wales is currently enjoying\ud a sustained period of growth and vitality unparalleled in any other area of the Welsh book\ud industry.

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