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  • Publication . Report . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Szprot, Jakub; Arpagaus, Brigitte; Ciula, Arianna; Clivaz, Claire; Gabay, Simon; Honegger, Matthieu; Hughes, Lorna; Immenhauser, Beat; Jakeman, Neil; Lhotak, Martin; +8 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | DESIR (731081)

    This report provides information about activities and progress towards establishing DARIAH membership in six countries: the Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK, which took place between July and December 2019. Previous activities were described in detail in the D3.2 - Regularly Monitor Country-Specific Progress in Enabling New DARIAH Membership. During the project lifetime, the Czech Republic joined DARIAH ERIC; in other countries, collaboration with DARIAH has been greatly strengthened and significant progress regarding DARIAH membership has been achieved. The report also outlines the next steps in the accession processes, building on the results of the DESIR project.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tahko, Tuuli; Zehavi, Ora; Lhotak, Martin; Romanova, Natasha; Clivaz, Claire; Ros, Salvador; Raciti, Marco;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | Locus Ludi (741520), EC | DESIR (731081)

    The DESIR project sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and firmly establish it as a long-term leader and partner within arts and humanities communities. The project was designed to address six core infrastructural sustainability dimensions and one of these was dedicated to training and education, which is also one of the four pillars identified in the DARIAH Strategic Plan 2019-2026. In the framework of Work Package 7: Teaching, DESIR organised dedicated workshops in the six DARIAH accession countries (Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) to introduce them to the DARIAH infrastructure and related services, and to develop methodological research skills. The topic of each workshop was decided by accession countries representatives according to the training needs of the national communities of researchers in the (Digital) Humanities. Training topics varied greatly: on the one hand, some workshops had the objective to introduce participants to specific methodological research skills; on the other hand, a different approach was used, and some events focused on the infrastructural role of training and education. The workshops organised in the context of Work Package 7: Teaching are listed below:• CZECH REPUBLIC: “A series of fall tutorials 2019 organized by LINDAT/CLARIAHCZ, tutorial #3 on TEI Training”, November 28, 2019, Prague;• FINLAND: “Reuse & sustainability: Open Science and social sciences and humanities research infrastructures”, 23 October 2019, Helsinki;• ISRAEL: “Introduction to Text Encoding and Digital Editions”, 24 October 2019, Haifa;• SPAIN: “DESIR Workshop: Digital Tools, Shared Data, and Research Dissemination”, 3 July 2019, Madrid;• SWITZERLAND: “Sharing the Experience: Workflows for the Digital Humanities”, 5-6 December 2019, Neuchâtel;• UNITED KINGDOM: “Research Software Engineering for Digital Humanities: Role of Training in Sustaining Expertise”, 9 December, London.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claire Clivaz;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    The article is available in open access on the publisher website.; International audience; By examining the case of the French translation of the expression "digital humanities" (DH), this article argues that cultural diversity and multilingualism could be fostered in digital culture. If other languages have been invited and forced to welcome this English phrase, its translations have to be studied since they could potentially have strong epistemological backwash-effects on it. Through an historical etymological inquiry, it can be demonstrated that the use of the outmoded French word humanités is the most significant element in the two French expressions humanités numériques or humanités digitales. This single word opens up a specific space for humanist approaches within the open-ended digital approaches. On this base, the encounter between Humanities and hard sciences can be reconsidered, as it happens already in two examples of new DH masters in French-speaking countries. To my late mother, who read so many books aloud to me, building my cultural memory of the forgotten meanings of words By examining the case of the French translation of the expression "digital humanities" (DH), this article argues that cultural diversity and multilingualism could be fostered in digital culture. At first glance, the international success of this expression seems to contradict this statement: isn't it a clear example of English language domination over other Western and non-Western languages? Used in written form for Lost in translation? The odyssey of 'digital humanities' in French 27 Studia UBB Digitalia Volume 62, No. 1, 2017 the first time in 2004 (Kirschenbaum 56), tirelessly discussed in DH conferences and works, "DH" has quickly been used in professorship titles, in undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, or to qualify centers, laboratories, and research projects (Clivaz "Common Era" 41). If other languages have been invited and forced to welcome this expression, its translations have to be studied since they could potentially have strong epistemological backwash-effects on it. French is an example worth examining: it can be demonstrated that the use of the outmoded French word humanités is the most significant element in the two French expressions humanités numériques or humanités digitales. This single word opens up a specific space for humanist approaches within the open-ended digital approaches. The introduction below aims to present the specific impact of a study of the phrase "digital humanities" and its translations within the general problematic of the phrase's definition. The second part of this article summarizes the main progressions and arguments in the discussions surrounding humanités numériques (humanities computing) and humanités digitales (digital humanities) in the French-speaking sphere. The third section examines the historical epistemology of humanités while the final section considers the resulting confrontation between the humanities and the 'hard' sciences: this underlines their potential synergy and the proper role of the humanities.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nadia Boukhelifa; Michael Bryant; Natasa Bulatovic; Ivan Čukić; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Milica Knežević; Jörg Lehmann; David I. Stuart; Carsten Thiel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United Kingdom, France
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; The CENDARI infrastructure is a research-supporting platform designed to provide tools for transnational historical research, focusing on two topics: medieval culture and World War I. It exposes to the end users modern Web-based tools relying on a sophisticated infrastructure to collect, enrich, annotate, and search through large document corpora. Supporting researchers in their daily work is a novel concern for infrastructures. We describe how we gathered requirements through multiple methods to understand historians' needs and derive an abstract workflow to support them. We then outline the tools that we have built, tying their technical descriptions to the user requirements. The main tools are the note-taking environment and its faceted search capabilities; the data integration platform including the Data API, supporting semantic enrichment through entity recognition; and the environment supporting the software development processes throughout the project to keep both technical partners and researchers in the loop. The outcomes are technical together with new resources developed and gathered, and the research workflow that has been described and documented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martin Grandjean;

    International audience; Defining digital humanities might be an endless debate if we stick to the discussion about the boundaries of this concept as an academic “discipline”. In an attempt to concretely identify this field and its actors, this paper shows that it is possible to analyse them through Twitter, a social media widely used by this “community of practice”. Based on a network analysis of 2,500 users identified as members of this movement, the visualisation of the “who’s following who?” graph allows us to highlight the structure of the network’s relationships, and identify users whose position is particular. Specifically, we show that linguistic groups are key factors to explain clustering within a network whose characteristics look similar to a small world.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Michael Gasser;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Switzerland, France

    For many libraries, mass digitisation has become routine. Digitisation centres are available in many places and there is a wealth of online platforms for the presentation of a wide variety of different media. Current projects from ETH Library reveal the directions in which the enormous potential harboured in these platforms and the millions of digital copies already produced may evolve. Research partnerships play just as important a role here as active user participation and intensified outreach. HAL Archive

Advanced search in
Research products
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Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
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Include:
6 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Publication . Report . 2019
    English
    Authors: 
    Szprot, Jakub; Arpagaus, Brigitte; Ciula, Arianna; Clivaz, Claire; Gabay, Simon; Honegger, Matthieu; Hughes, Lorna; Immenhauser, Beat; Jakeman, Neil; Lhotak, Martin; +8 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | DESIR (731081)

    This report provides information about activities and progress towards establishing DARIAH membership in six countries: the Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK, which took place between July and December 2019. Previous activities were described in detail in the D3.2 - Regularly Monitor Country-Specific Progress in Enabling New DARIAH Membership. During the project lifetime, the Czech Republic joined DARIAH ERIC; in other countries, collaboration with DARIAH has been greatly strengthened and significant progress regarding DARIAH membership has been achieved. The report also outlines the next steps in the accession processes, building on the results of the DESIR project.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Tahko, Tuuli; Zehavi, Ora; Lhotak, Martin; Romanova, Natasha; Clivaz, Claire; Ros, Salvador; Raciti, Marco;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: EC | Locus Ludi (741520), EC | DESIR (731081)

    The DESIR project sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and firmly establish it as a long-term leader and partner within arts and humanities communities. The project was designed to address six core infrastructural sustainability dimensions and one of these was dedicated to training and education, which is also one of the four pillars identified in the DARIAH Strategic Plan 2019-2026. In the framework of Work Package 7: Teaching, DESIR organised dedicated workshops in the six DARIAH accession countries (Czech Republic, Finland, Israel, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom) to introduce them to the DARIAH infrastructure and related services, and to develop methodological research skills. The topic of each workshop was decided by accession countries representatives according to the training needs of the national communities of researchers in the (Digital) Humanities. Training topics varied greatly: on the one hand, some workshops had the objective to introduce participants to specific methodological research skills; on the other hand, a different approach was used, and some events focused on the infrastructural role of training and education. The workshops organised in the context of Work Package 7: Teaching are listed below:• CZECH REPUBLIC: “A series of fall tutorials 2019 organized by LINDAT/CLARIAHCZ, tutorial #3 on TEI Training”, November 28, 2019, Prague;• FINLAND: “Reuse & sustainability: Open Science and social sciences and humanities research infrastructures”, 23 October 2019, Helsinki;• ISRAEL: “Introduction to Text Encoding and Digital Editions”, 24 October 2019, Haifa;• SPAIN: “DESIR Workshop: Digital Tools, Shared Data, and Research Dissemination”, 3 July 2019, Madrid;• SWITZERLAND: “Sharing the Experience: Workflows for the Digital Humanities”, 5-6 December 2019, Neuchâtel;• UNITED KINGDOM: “Research Software Engineering for Digital Humanities: Role of Training in Sustaining Expertise”, 9 December, London.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claire Clivaz;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    The article is available in open access on the publisher website.; International audience; By examining the case of the French translation of the expression "digital humanities" (DH), this article argues that cultural diversity and multilingualism could be fostered in digital culture. If other languages have been invited and forced to welcome this English phrase, its translations have to be studied since they could potentially have strong epistemological backwash-effects on it. Through an historical etymological inquiry, it can be demonstrated that the use of the outmoded French word humanités is the most significant element in the two French expressions humanités numériques or humanités digitales. This single word opens up a specific space for humanist approaches within the open-ended digital approaches. On this base, the encounter between Humanities and hard sciences can be reconsidered, as it happens already in two examples of new DH masters in French-speaking countries. To my late mother, who read so many books aloud to me, building my cultural memory of the forgotten meanings of words By examining the case of the French translation of the expression "digital humanities" (DH), this article argues that cultural diversity and multilingualism could be fostered in digital culture. At first glance, the international success of this expression seems to contradict this statement: isn't it a clear example of English language domination over other Western and non-Western languages? Used in written form for Lost in translation? The odyssey of 'digital humanities' in French 27 Studia UBB Digitalia Volume 62, No. 1, 2017 the first time in 2004 (Kirschenbaum 56), tirelessly discussed in DH conferences and works, "DH" has quickly been used in professorship titles, in undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, or to qualify centers, laboratories, and research projects (Clivaz "Common Era" 41). If other languages have been invited and forced to welcome this expression, its translations have to be studied since they could potentially have strong epistemological backwash-effects on it. French is an example worth examining: it can be demonstrated that the use of the outmoded French word humanités is the most significant element in the two French expressions humanités numériques or humanités digitales. This single word opens up a specific space for humanist approaches within the open-ended digital approaches. The introduction below aims to present the specific impact of a study of the phrase "digital humanities" and its translations within the general problematic of the phrase's definition. The second part of this article summarizes the main progressions and arguments in the discussions surrounding humanités numériques (humanities computing) and humanités digitales (digital humanities) in the French-speaking sphere. The third section examines the historical epistemology of humanités while the final section considers the resulting confrontation between the humanities and the 'hard' sciences: this underlines their potential synergy and the proper role of the humanities.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nadia Boukhelifa; Michael Bryant; Natasa Bulatovic; Ivan Čukić; Jean-Daniel Fekete; Milica Knežević; Jörg Lehmann; David I. Stuart; Carsten Thiel;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United Kingdom, France
    Project: EC | CENDARI (284432)

    International audience; The CENDARI infrastructure is a research-supporting platform designed to provide tools for transnational historical research, focusing on two topics: medieval culture and World War I. It exposes to the end users modern Web-based tools relying on a sophisticated infrastructure to collect, enrich, annotate, and search through large document corpora. Supporting researchers in their daily work is a novel concern for infrastructures. We describe how we gathered requirements through multiple methods to understand historians' needs and derive an abstract workflow to support them. We then outline the tools that we have built, tying their technical descriptions to the user requirements. The main tools are the note-taking environment and its faceted search capabilities; the data integration platform including the Data API, supporting semantic enrichment through entity recognition; and the environment supporting the software development processes throughout the project to keep both technical partners and researchers in the loop. The outcomes are technical together with new resources developed and gathered, and the research workflow that has been described and documented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Martin Grandjean;

    International audience; Defining digital humanities might be an endless debate if we stick to the discussion about the boundaries of this concept as an academic “discipline”. In an attempt to concretely identify this field and its actors, this paper shows that it is possible to analyse them through Twitter, a social media widely used by this “community of practice”. Based on a network analysis of 2,500 users identified as members of this movement, the visualisation of the “who’s following who?” graph allows us to highlight the structure of the network’s relationships, and identify users whose position is particular. Specifically, we show that linguistic groups are key factors to explain clustering within a network whose characteristics look similar to a small world.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Michael Gasser;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Switzerland, France

    For many libraries, mass digitisation has become routine. Digitisation centres are available in many places and there is a wealth of online platforms for the presentation of a wide variety of different media. Current projects from ETH Library reveal the directions in which the enormous potential harboured in these platforms and the millions of digital copies already produced may evolve. Research partnerships play just as important a role here as active user participation and intensified outreach. HAL Archive

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