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  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Stina Teilmann-Lock; Trine Brun Petersen;
    Country: Denmark

    This article investigates fashion theoretical perspectives on European and US litigation over Louboutin’s red sole mark. It argues that fashion has logics that make it a special case with respect to intellectual property law.In recent disputes over Louboutin’s red sole mark including cases heard by the Court of Justice of the European Union and the US Second Circuit Court of Appeals a number of assumptions as to how fashions emerge and are disseminated are made. We test these assumptions against current fashion theory. In a fashion theoretical perspective the red sole is a polysemic gesture involving both branding and aesthetic communication through specific design features, which endows the shoe with aesthetic, social and economic value on the high fashion market. Accordingly, Louboutin’s red sole may be said to serve an aesthetic purpose and to work as an indicator of source at the same time.In our view, fashion is a special case in relation to intellectual property law for two reasons in particular: (i) the temporal logic of fashion is different from that of most other products because fashion is change and (ii) fashion has logics where design features are utterly self-referential: for example, one purpose of the red sole is to announce that ‘this is fashion’. Strong protection of fashion stifles both of these logics and is, therefore, not good for the fashion market as a whole.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Henry Bainton;
    Country: Denmark

    This article explores why Herbert of Bosham (d. ca. 1194) claimed that writing history and expressing emotion were inherently incompatible activities. Focusing on the Historia that Bosham wrote (ca. 1184–ca. 1189) about the life and death of his close friend, Thomas Becket, I begin by situating Bosham’s claim within the wider framework of history-writing’s disavowal of the emotions. I then go on to unpack Bosham’s definition of historia as a literary genre and to explain his understanding of emotional expression, using the frameworks of medieval grammar, rhetoric, and biblical exegesis to do so. While Bosham understood history-writing as a genre policed by strict “laws,” I argue, he understood the emotions as inherently lawless—and thus unable to be contained by the normal rules of discourse. This means that when Bosham periodically abandoned the chronological progression that normative historical writing demanded, he was not just being the poor historian that modern scholarship has often made him out to be. Rather, he was being daringly experimental, quite deliberately using rhetoric’s most emotional techniques (especially amplificatio, apostrophe, and enargaeia) in order to give his Historia a lyrical complexion. I argue here that the Historia’s alternation between lyrical stasis and historiographical progression was both personal and political. On the one hand, it mirrored Bosham’s own alternation between mourning and consolation. On the other, by refusing the demands of narrative progress, the Historia refuses to close the Becket conflict down and to bring it safely to a conclusion.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Sofie Kluge;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Peter Simonsen; Mathies Græsborg Aarhus;
    Country: Denmark

    Several contemporary works of British theatre represent a new social group under formation, the precariat. A special feature of this theatre is its attention to how it feels to live in precarity and experience various forms of social and existential insecurity. Departing from an outline of the main theories of precarity within the social sciences and critical theory, the essay gives an overview of representations of the precariat in works of contemporary British drama, which may be classified as formative for the development of a new ”theatre of the precariat”. It then turns to a more detailed analysis of Alexander Zeldin’s play Love (2016), to illustrate how the interest in precarity manifests itself on both thematic and formal levels in the theatre of the precariat. The essay concludes with reflections on the potential political and ethical effects of contemporary theatre by discussing Zeldin’s method of collaboratively devising with the company as a way to oppose the precarization of artistic work and offer a model for social transformation.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Rosa María Rodríguez Porto;
    Country: Denmark

    Despite the wealth of scholarly work that has been done –and is being done– on the ‘Biblias romanceadas’, a systematic survey of the pictorial cycles found in MSS Escorial, I.I.3, I.I.4, I.I.5, I.I.7, Ajuda 52-XIII-1, and the Biblia de Alba remains still lacking. Admittedly, the miniatures of the famous Arragel BibleArragel Bibl have attracted considerable attention since the manuscript was first published by Paz y Meliá in 1922, but in most of cases only inasmuch as their striking features were to be linked to rabbinic traditions. For the rest of the manuscripts, the divide created along the lines of art history and philology has turned them into fragmentary realities devoid of any coherent meaning, further isolating these works from the complex visual culture they belonged to. Besides, both art historians and philologists alike seem to have been more concerned with a search for origins and sources than with an engaged analysis of the subtle interplay of text and images in each individual manuscript. However, the scrutiny of Escorial, I.I.3 [E3] proves to be controversial in more than one sense. Its 65 illustrations display a visual narrative that has nothing to do with the iconographic programme designed for the Biblia de Alba. Even if the biblical version copied in E3 can be considered as ‘the closest textual witness to the traditional Sephardic translation procedures’ (Pueyo – Enrique-Arias, 2013: 203), the accompanying miniatures reveal no significant trace of midrashic elements or any detail akin to the illustrated Haggadot whatsoever. In fact, comparison with the biblical compilation copied and illustrated for Queen María of Portugal after Alfonso X’s General Estoria (Évora, BM, MS CXXV2-3 and Escorial, I.I.2; ca. 1340) points out to the existence of some common trends in the depiction of Old Testament episodes in Late Medieval Castile. Regardless, the patrons of this lavish Bible –certainly Christian and pertaining to the upper nobility– have not been identified yet. There is no agreement on the date of the manuscript, either (ca. 1425-1450 for Avenoza; ca. 1487-1501 for Marchena and Villaseñor), although the miniaturists involved seem to have been worked in the illustration of other religious books for the Cathedral of Seville and the Catholic Kings.Several questions can be posed, then, when looking at E3: To what extent was the ‘Jewishness’ of the text highlighted/nuanced/neutralised by the images (and by appending the deuterocanonical Book of the Maccabees)? Were any of the features of the manuscript perceived as particularly ‘Jewish’ by the audience? In sum, did this manuscript stage any kind of religious dispute or, conversely, did it evince that biblical text could be turned in just historia sagrada?

  • Publication . Article . 2018
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Trine Bottos Olsen; Peter Mygind Leth;
    Country: Denmark

    Freezing as a method for hiding a body is rare. We report here a homicide case in which three bodies were concealed in a freezer. This presented the pathologist with the problem of how to thaw the bodies and simultaneously avoid decomposition of the uppermost body. The problem was solved by slow thawing in a refrigerated morgue and by removing the bodies one after the other from top to bottom. The victims were a 27-year old mother and her two daughters, 7 and 9 years of age. The perpetrator was the 34-year old now-divorced husband and father. All were refugees from Syria. The perpetrator fled back to Syria. He was later arrested in Syria, confessed the crime and was sentenced to life imprisonment. The autopsy findings is discussed and compared to finding reported in the scientific literature.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Katarzyna Stoklosa;
    Country: Denmark

    Academic research is gradually rediscovering the First World War in Poland. For a long time, the First World War has been pushed into the background in Polish historiography. Because of its complexity and very many ambivalent factors, the First World War was difficult to classify within Polish national history. The fact that the Polish State did not exist prior to 1918 is often presented as the main reason behind this lack of interest in Poland as far as the First World War is concerned. Furthermore, any such attention has concentrated primarily on the war as the event that enabled Poland to exist once again on the world map. To a great extent, myths such as these developed as a result of influence exerted by the Polish Catholic Church. Before WWI, non-existent Poland was presented as the “Christ of Nations,” a state that had to suffer and to struggle for her independence. The strong bond between the Polish people and the Roman-Catholic faith became clear under the influence of the 19th century nation building process. During the period of Poland’s partitions (1795-1918), the Catholic Church came to be seen as a safe haven. This article analyses the extent and importance of religious faith during the First World War in Poland.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Jesper Majbom Madsen;
    Publisher: Brill
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Deborah Simonton;
    Country: Denmark

    Since the seminal work published in 1982 by Neil McKendrick, John Brewer and J. H. Plumb (Hutchinson), there has been a copious and vigorous literature on consumption and luxury, which has develope...

Advanced search in
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arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
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Include:
45 Research products, page 1 of 5
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Stina Teilmann-Lock; Trine Brun Petersen;
    Country: Denmark

    This article investigates fashion theoretical perspectives on European and US litigation over Louboutin’s red sole mark. It argues that fashion has logics that make it a special case with respect to intellectual property law.In recent disputes over Louboutin’s red sole mark including cases heard by the Court of Justice of the European Union and the US Second Circuit Court of Appeals a number of assumptions as to how fashions emerge and are disseminated are made. We test these assumptions against current fashion theory. In a fashion theoretical perspective the red sole is a polysemic gesture involving both branding and aesthetic communication through specific design features, which endows the shoe with aesthetic, social and economic value on the high fashion market. Accordingly, Louboutin’s red sole may be said to serve an aesthetic purpose and to work as an indicator of source at the same time.In our view, fashion is a special case in relation to intellectual property law for two reasons in particular: (i) the temporal logic of fashion is different from that of most other products because fashion is change and (ii) fashion has logics where design features are utterly self-referential: for example, one purpose of the red sole is to announce that ‘this is fashion’. Strong protection of fashion stifles both of these logics and is, therefore, not good for the fashion market as a whole.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Henry Bainton;
    Country: Denmark

    This article explores why Herbert of Bosham (d. ca. 1194) claimed that writing history and expressing emotion were inherently incompatible activities. Focusing on the Historia that Bosham wrote (ca. 1184–ca. 1189) about the life and death of his close friend, Thomas Becket, I begin by situating Bosham’s claim within the wider framework of history-writing’s disavowal of the emotions. I then go on to unpack Bosham’s definition of historia as a literary genre and to explain his understanding of emotional expression, using the frameworks of medieval grammar, rhetoric, and biblical exegesis to do so. While Bosham understood history-writing as a genre policed by strict “laws,” I argue, he understood the emotions as inherently lawless—and thus unable to be contained by the normal rules of discourse. This means that when Bosham periodically abandoned the chronological progression that normative historical writing demanded, he was not just being the poor historian that modern scholarship has often made him out to be. Rather, he was being daringly experimental, quite deliberately using rhetoric’s most emotional techniques (especially amplificatio, apostrophe, and enargaeia) in order to give his Historia a lyrical complexion. I argue here that the Historia’s alternation between lyrical stasis and historiographical progression was both personal and political. On the one hand, it mirrored Bosham’s own alternation between mourning and consolation. On the other, by refusing the demands of narrative progress, the Historia refuses to close the Becket conflict down and to bring it safely to a conclusion.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Sofie Kluge;
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Peter Simonsen; Mathies Græsborg Aarhus;
    Country: Denmark

    Several contemporary works of British theatre represent a new social group under formation, the precariat. A special feature of this theatre is its attention to how it feels to live in precarity and experience various forms of social and existential insecurity. Departing from an outline of the main theories of precarity within the social sciences and critical theory, the essay gives an overview of representations of the precariat in works of contemporary British drama, which may be classified as formative for the development of a new ”theatre of the precariat”. It then turns to a more detailed analysis of Alexander Zeldin’s play Love (2016), to illustrate how the interest in precarity manifests itself on both thematic and formal levels in the theatre of the precariat. The essay concludes with reflections on the potential political and ethical effects of contemporary theatre by discussing Zeldin’s method of collaboratively devising with the company as a way to oppose the precarization of artistic work and offer a model for social transformation.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Rosa María Rodríguez Porto;
    Country: Denmark

    Despite the wealth of scholarly work that has been done –and is being done– on the ‘Biblias romanceadas’, a systematic survey of the pictorial cycles found in MSS Escorial, I.I.3, I.I.4, I.I.5, I.I.7, Ajuda 52-XIII-1, and the Biblia de Alba remains still lacking. Admittedly, the miniatures of the famous Arragel BibleArragel Bibl have attracted considerable attention since the manuscript was first published by Paz y Meliá in 1922, but in most of cases only inasmuch as their striking features were to be linked to rabbinic traditions. For the rest of the manuscripts, the divide created along the lines of art history and philology has turned them into fragmentary realities devoid of any coherent meaning, further isolating these works from the complex visual culture they belonged to. Besides, both art historians and philologists alike seem to have been more concerned with a search for origins and sources than with an engaged analysis of the subtle interplay of text and images in each individual manuscript. However, the scrutiny of Escorial, I.I.3 [E3] proves to be controversial in more than one sense. Its 65 illustrations display a visual narrative that has nothing to do with the iconographic programme designed for the Biblia de Alba. Even if the biblical version copied in E3 can be considered as ‘the closest textual witness to the traditional Sephardic translation procedures’ (Pueyo – Enrique-Arias, 2013: 203), the accompanying miniatures reveal no significant trace of midrashic elements or any detail akin to the illustrated Haggadot whatsoever. In fact, comparison with the biblical compilation copied and illustrated for Queen María of Portugal after Alfonso X’s General Estoria (Évora, BM, MS CXXV2-3 and Escorial, I.I.2; ca. 1340) points out to the existence of some common trends in the depiction of Old Testament episodes in Late Medieval Castile. Regardless, the patrons of this lavish Bible –certainly Christian and pertaining to the upper nobility– have not been identified yet. There is no agreement on the date of the manuscript, either (ca. 1425-1450 for Avenoza; ca. 1487-1501 for Marchena and Villaseñor), although the miniaturists involved seem to have been worked in the illustration of other religious books for the Cathedral of Seville and the Catholic Kings.Several questions can be posed, then, when looking at E3: To what extent was the ‘Jewishness’ of the text highlighted/nuanced/neutralised by the images (and by appending the deuterocanonical Book of the Maccabees)? Were any of the features of the manuscript perceived as particularly ‘Jewish’ by the audience? In sum, did this manuscript stage any kind of religious dispute or, conversely, did it evince that biblical text could be turned in just historia sagrada?

  • Publication . Article . 2018
    Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Trine Bottos Olsen; Peter Mygind Leth;
    Country: Denmark

    Freezing as a method for hiding a body is rare. We report here a homicide case in which three bodies were concealed in a freezer. This presented the pathologist with the problem of how to thaw the bodies and simultaneously avoid decomposition of the uppermost body. The problem was solved by slow thawing in a refrigerated morgue and by removing the bodies one after the other from top to bottom. The victims were a 27-year old mother and her two daughters, 7 and 9 years of age. The perpetrator was the 34-year old now-divorced husband and father. All were refugees from Syria. The perpetrator fled back to Syria. He was later arrested in Syria, confessed the crime and was sentenced to life imprisonment. The autopsy findings is discussed and compared to finding reported in the scientific literature.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Katarzyna Stoklosa;
    Country: Denmark

    Academic research is gradually rediscovering the First World War in Poland. For a long time, the First World War has been pushed into the background in Polish historiography. Because of its complexity and very many ambivalent factors, the First World War was difficult to classify within Polish national history. The fact that the Polish State did not exist prior to 1918 is often presented as the main reason behind this lack of interest in Poland as far as the First World War is concerned. Furthermore, any such attention has concentrated primarily on the war as the event that enabled Poland to exist once again on the world map. To a great extent, myths such as these developed as a result of influence exerted by the Polish Catholic Church. Before WWI, non-existent Poland was presented as the “Christ of Nations,” a state that had to suffer and to struggle for her independence. The strong bond between the Polish people and the Roman-Catholic faith became clear under the influence of the 19th century nation building process. During the period of Poland’s partitions (1795-1918), the Catholic Church came to be seen as a safe haven. This article analyses the extent and importance of religious faith during the First World War in Poland.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Jesper Majbom Madsen;
    Publisher: Brill
    Country: Denmark
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Deborah Simonton;
    Country: Denmark

    Since the seminal work published in 1982 by Neil McKendrick, John Brewer and J. H. Plumb (Hutchinson), there has been a copious and vigorous literature on consumption and luxury, which has develope...

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