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  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Gita Babazadeh Eslamlou; Alexander Jung; Norbert Goertz; Mehdi Fereydooni;

    We consider the problem of recovering a graph signal from noisy and incomplete information. In particular, we propose an approximate message passing based iterative method for graph signal recovery. The recovery of the graph signal is based on noisy signal values at a small number of randomly selected nodes. Our approach exploits the smoothness of typical graph signals occurring in many applications, such as wireless sensor networks or social network analysis. The graph signals are smooth in the sense that neighboring nodes have similar signal values. Methodologically, our algorithm is a new instance of the denoising based approximate message passing framework introduced recently by Metzler et. al. We validate the performance of the proposed recovery method via numerical experiments. In certain scenarios our algorithm outperforms existing methods.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sonja Spitzer; Angela Greulich; Bernhard Hammer;
    Country: Austria

    AbstractUnderstanding child-related costs is crucial given their impact on fertility and labour supply decisions. We explore the subjective cost of young children in Europe by analysing the effect of child births on parents’ self-reported ability to make ends meet, and link it to changes in objective economic well-being such as income, benefits, and employment. The study is based on EU-SILC longitudinal data for 30 European countries from 2004 to 2019, enabling comparisons between country groups of different welfare regimes. Results show that newborns decrease subjective economic well-being in all regions, yet with economies of scale for the number of children. Mediation analyses reveal that the substantial labour income losses of mothers (indirect costs) explain only a small part of subjective child costs. In the first year after birth, these losses are mostly compensated for via public transfers or increased labour income of fathers, except in regions where women take extensive parental leave. This suggests that the initial drop in subjective economic well-being after childbirth is caused by increased expenses due to the birth of a child (direct costs) and other drivers such as stress that are reflected in the self-reported indicator.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fridolin Wild; Mödritscher, Felix;
    Project: EC | ROLE (231396)

    In industrial and educational practice, learning environments are designed and implemented by experts from many different fields, reaching from traditional software development and product management to pedagogy and didactics. Workplace and lifelong learning, however, implicate that learners are more self-motivated, capable, and self-confident in achieving their goals and, consequently, tempt to consider that certain development tasks can be shifted to end-users in order to facilitate a more flexible, open, and responsive learning environment. With respect to streams like end-user development and opportunistic design, this paper elaborates a methodology for user-driven environment design for action-based activities. Based on a former research approach named 'Mash-Up Personal Learning Environments'(MUPPLE) we demonstrate how workplace and lifelong learners can be empowered to develop their own environment for collaborating in learner networks and which prerequisites and support facilities are necessary for this methodology.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2014
    Open Access English
    Publisher: oeaw
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | MS.MONINA (263479)
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Bernard Klonjkowski; Dieter Klein; Sandra Galea; Francoise Gavard; Martine Monteil; Lidia Duarte; Annie Fournier; Sophie Sayon; Kamila Górna; Reinhard Ertl; +4 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The evaluation of vaccine strategies in animal models is essential for the development of a vaccine against HIV. In efficacy trials conducted in non-human primate models of AIDS, vaccines based on adenoviruses compared favourably with other vaccine vectors. To determine whether this strategy could be transposed to another animal model, and by extension, to humans, we have evaluated the efficacy of adenoviral vectors in a natural model of AIDS, infection of the cat by the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Recombinant canine adenoviruses expressing the envelope glycoproteins or the Gag protein of a primary strain of FIV were constructed. Three groups of six cats were immunised twice with vectors expressing FIV antigens or with a vector expressing an irrelevant antigen, green fluorescent protein, by intramuscular and subcutaneous routes. Humoral responses were elicited against the transgene product in 6/6, 3/6 and 0/6 cats after immunisation against green fluorescent protein, Gag or the envelope glycoproteins, respectively. Six weeks after the second administration, cats were challenged by the intraperitoneal route with the homologous strain, and viral burden in plasma was followed by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunisation with FIV antigens did not afford protection. Rather, viral RNA was detected at earlier time points in cats immunised against Gag than in cats immunised with a vector expressing an irrelevant antigen. Such immune-mediated enhancement did not appear to have a long-range impact on viral set point or inversion of the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio. Thus, in the feline AIDS model pre-existing immunity against a viral antigen exacerbated acute phase infection.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    GulwaniSumit; RadičekIvan; ZulegerFlorian;

    Providing feedback on programming assignments is a tedious task for the instructor, and even impossible in large Massive Open Online Courses with thousands of students. Previous research has suggested that program repair techniques can be used to generate feedback in programming education. In this paper, we present a novel fully automated program repair algorithm for introductory programming assignments. The key idea of the technique, which enables automation and scalability, is to use the existing correct student solutions to repair the incorrect attempts. We evaluate the approach in two experiments: (I) We evaluate the number, size and quality of the generated repairs on 4,293 incorrect student attempts from an existing MOOC. We find that our approach can repair 97% of student attempts, while 81% of those are small repairs of good quality. (II) We conduct a preliminary user study on performance and repair usefulness in an interactive teaching setting. We obtain promising initial results (the average usefulness grade 3.4 on a scale from 1 to 5), and conclude that our approach can be used in an interactive setting. Extended version of the PLDI paper of the same name

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . Other literature type . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Onur Kocberber; Boris Grot; Javier Picorel; Babak Falsafi; Kevin T. Lim; Parthasarathy Ranganathan;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Switzerland
    Project: EC | HIPEAC (287759)

    The explosive growth in digital data and its growing role in real-time decision support motivate the design of high-performance database management systems (DBMSs). Meanwhile, slowdown in supply voltage scaling has stymied improvements in core performance and ushered an era of power-limited chips. These developments motivate the design of DBMS accelerators that (a) maximize utility by accelerating the dominant operations, and (b) provide flexibility in the choice of DBMS, data layout, and data types.We study data analytics workloads on contemporary in-memory databases and find hash index lookups to be the largest single contributor to the overall execution time. The critical path in hash index lookups consists of ALU-intensive key hashing followed by pointer chasing through a node list. Based on these observations, we introduce Widx, an on-chip accelerator for database hash index lookups, which achieves both high performance and flexibility by (1) decoupling key hashing from the list traversal, and (2) processing multiple keys in parallel on a set of programmable walker units. Widx reduces design cost and complexity through its tight integration with a conventional core, thus eliminating the need for a dedicated TLB and cache. An evaluation of Widx on a set of modern data analytics workloads (TPC-H, TPC-DS) using full-system simulation shows an average speedup of 3.1x over an aggressive OoO core on bulk hash table operations, while reducing the OoO core energy by 83%.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alexander Meschtscherjakov; Manfred Tscheligi; Bastian Pfleging; Shadan Sadeghian Borojeni; Wendy Ju; Philippe Palanque; Andreas Riener; Bilge Mutlu; Andrew L. Kun;
    Publisher: ACM : Association for Computing Machinery
    Country: France

    The rise of evermore autonomy in vehicles and the expected introduction of self-driving cars have led to a focus on human interactions with such systems from an HCI perspective over the last years. Automotive User Interface researchers have been investigating issues such as transition control procedures, shared control, (over)trust, and overall user experience in automated vehicles. Now, it is time to open the research field of automated driving to other CHI research fields, such as Human-Robot-Interaction (HRI), aeronautics and space, conversational agents, or smart devices. These communities have been dealing with the interplay between humans and automated systems for more than 30 years. In this workshop, we aim to provide a forum to discuss what can be learnt from other domains for the design of autonomous vehicles. Interaction design problems that occur in these domains, such as transition control procedures, how to build trust in the system, and ethics will be discussed.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2014
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christof Gattringer;
    Project: EC | STRONGNET (238353), FWF | Hadrones in vacuum, nucle... (W 1203), FWF | Hadron Physics from Latti... (I 1452)

    In recent years the complex action problem of lattice field theory at finite density was overcome for several system by mapping them to dual variables (flux lines and surfaces). We illustrate this mapping for the case of the U(1) gauge Higgs system and present some representative physics results for this model. Conceptual challenges such as spectroscopy in the dual approach, as well as algorithmic developments are discussed and related ideas for systems with fermions are addressed. Models where the dual variables approach solves the complex action problem can serve as reference systems for other approaches to finite density lattice field theory and we discuss some examples. Finally we address the strategy of a partial dualization in certain limits, e.g., for strong coupling and large mass.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jelle van Dijk; Niels Hendriks; Christopher Frauenberger; Fenne Verhoeven; Karin Slegers; Eva Brandt; Rita Maldonado Branco;
    Countries: Netherlands, Belgium

    from the article: ABSTRACT Participatory Design has developed methods that empower people with impairments to actively take part in the design process. Many designed artifacts for this target group likewise aim to empower their users in daily life. In this workshop, we share and relate best practices of both empowering methods and empowering designs. Participants are therefore invited to bring along cases of designing for- and with people with sensory-, cognitive- or social impairments. Our workshop consists of three parts: (1) Foregrounding empowering elements in PD methods using method stories, containing the backstory of a method put into practice; (2) Reflecting on technological artifacts, exploring the empowering qualities of person-artifact-context interaction; (3) constructing a critical synopsis of the various relationships between empowering products and -methods. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2948076.2948101

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
4,545 Research products, page 1 of 455
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Gita Babazadeh Eslamlou; Alexander Jung; Norbert Goertz; Mehdi Fereydooni;

    We consider the problem of recovering a graph signal from noisy and incomplete information. In particular, we propose an approximate message passing based iterative method for graph signal recovery. The recovery of the graph signal is based on noisy signal values at a small number of randomly selected nodes. Our approach exploits the smoothness of typical graph signals occurring in many applications, such as wireless sensor networks or social network analysis. The graph signals are smooth in the sense that neighboring nodes have similar signal values. Methodologically, our algorithm is a new instance of the denoising based approximate message passing framework introduced recently by Metzler et. al. We validate the performance of the proposed recovery method via numerical experiments. In certain scenarios our algorithm outperforms existing methods.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sonja Spitzer; Angela Greulich; Bernhard Hammer;
    Country: Austria

    AbstractUnderstanding child-related costs is crucial given their impact on fertility and labour supply decisions. We explore the subjective cost of young children in Europe by analysing the effect of child births on parents’ self-reported ability to make ends meet, and link it to changes in objective economic well-being such as income, benefits, and employment. The study is based on EU-SILC longitudinal data for 30 European countries from 2004 to 2019, enabling comparisons between country groups of different welfare regimes. Results show that newborns decrease subjective economic well-being in all regions, yet with economies of scale for the number of children. Mediation analyses reveal that the substantial labour income losses of mothers (indirect costs) explain only a small part of subjective child costs. In the first year after birth, these losses are mostly compensated for via public transfers or increased labour income of fathers, except in regions where women take extensive parental leave. This suggests that the initial drop in subjective economic well-being after childbirth is caused by increased expenses due to the birth of a child (direct costs) and other drivers such as stress that are reflected in the self-reported indicator.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fridolin Wild; Mödritscher, Felix;
    Project: EC | ROLE (231396)

    In industrial and educational practice, learning environments are designed and implemented by experts from many different fields, reaching from traditional software development and product management to pedagogy and didactics. Workplace and lifelong learning, however, implicate that learners are more self-motivated, capable, and self-confident in achieving their goals and, consequently, tempt to consider that certain development tasks can be shifted to end-users in order to facilitate a more flexible, open, and responsive learning environment. With respect to streams like end-user development and opportunistic design, this paper elaborates a methodology for user-driven environment design for action-based activities. Based on a former research approach named 'Mash-Up Personal Learning Environments'(MUPPLE) we demonstrate how workplace and lifelong learners can be empowered to develop their own environment for collaborating in learner networks and which prerequisites and support facilities are necessary for this methodology.

  • Publication . Conference object . 2014
    Open Access English
    Publisher: oeaw
    Country: Austria
    Project: EC | MS.MONINA (263479)
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Bernard Klonjkowski; Dieter Klein; Sandra Galea; Francoise Gavard; Martine Monteil; Lidia Duarte; Annie Fournier; Sophie Sayon; Kamila Górna; Reinhard Ertl; +4 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    International audience; The evaluation of vaccine strategies in animal models is essential for the development of a vaccine against HIV. In efficacy trials conducted in non-human primate models of AIDS, vaccines based on adenoviruses compared favourably with other vaccine vectors. To determine whether this strategy could be transposed to another animal model, and by extension, to humans, we have evaluated the efficacy of adenoviral vectors in a natural model of AIDS, infection of the cat by the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Recombinant canine adenoviruses expressing the envelope glycoproteins or the Gag protein of a primary strain of FIV were constructed. Three groups of six cats were immunised twice with vectors expressing FIV antigens or with a vector expressing an irrelevant antigen, green fluorescent protein, by intramuscular and subcutaneous routes. Humoral responses were elicited against the transgene product in 6/6, 3/6 and 0/6 cats after immunisation against green fluorescent protein, Gag or the envelope glycoproteins, respectively. Six weeks after the second administration, cats were challenged by the intraperitoneal route with the homologous strain, and viral burden in plasma was followed by quantitative RT-PCR. Immunisation with FIV antigens did not afford protection. Rather, viral RNA was detected at earlier time points in cats immunised against Gag than in cats immunised with a vector expressing an irrelevant antigen. Such immune-mediated enhancement did not appear to have a long-range impact on viral set point or inversion of the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio. Thus, in the feline AIDS model pre-existing immunity against a viral antigen exacerbated acute phase infection.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . Preprint . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    GulwaniSumit; RadičekIvan; ZulegerFlorian;

    Providing feedback on programming assignments is a tedious task for the instructor, and even impossible in large Massive Open Online Courses with thousands of students. Previous research has suggested that program repair techniques can be used to generate feedback in programming education. In this paper, we present a novel fully automated program repair algorithm for introductory programming assignments. The key idea of the technique, which enables automation and scalability, is to use the existing correct student solutions to repair the incorrect attempts. We evaluate the approach in two experiments: (I) We evaluate the number, size and quality of the generated repairs on 4,293 incorrect student attempts from an existing MOOC. We find that our approach can repair 97% of student attempts, while 81% of those are small repairs of good quality. (II) We conduct a preliminary user study on performance and repair usefulness in an interactive teaching setting. We obtain promising initial results (the average usefulness grade 3.4 on a scale from 1 to 5), and conclude that our approach can be used in an interactive setting. Extended version of the PLDI paper of the same name

  • Publication . Contribution for newspaper or weekly magazine . Conference object . Other literature type . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Onur Kocberber; Boris Grot; Javier Picorel; Babak Falsafi; Kevin T. Lim; Parthasarathy Ranganathan;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Switzerland
    Project: EC | HIPEAC (287759)

    The explosive growth in digital data and its growing role in real-time decision support motivate the design of high-performance database management systems (DBMSs). Meanwhile, slowdown in supply voltage scaling has stymied improvements in core performance and ushered an era of power-limited chips. These developments motivate the design of DBMS accelerators that (a) maximize utility by accelerating the dominant operations, and (b) provide flexibility in the choice of DBMS, data layout, and data types.We study data analytics workloads on contemporary in-memory databases and find hash index lookups to be the largest single contributor to the overall execution time. The critical path in hash index lookups consists of ALU-intensive key hashing followed by pointer chasing through a node list. Based on these observations, we introduce Widx, an on-chip accelerator for database hash index lookups, which achieves both high performance and flexibility by (1) decoupling key hashing from the list traversal, and (2) processing multiple keys in parallel on a set of programmable walker units. Widx reduces design cost and complexity through its tight integration with a conventional core, thus eliminating the need for a dedicated TLB and cache. An evaluation of Widx on a set of modern data analytics workloads (TPC-H, TPC-DS) using full-system simulation shows an average speedup of 3.1x over an aggressive OoO core on bulk hash table operations, while reducing the OoO core energy by 83%.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Alexander Meschtscherjakov; Manfred Tscheligi; Bastian Pfleging; Shadan Sadeghian Borojeni; Wendy Ju; Philippe Palanque; Andreas Riener; Bilge Mutlu; Andrew L. Kun;
    Publisher: ACM : Association for Computing Machinery
    Country: France

    The rise of evermore autonomy in vehicles and the expected introduction of self-driving cars have led to a focus on human interactions with such systems from an HCI perspective over the last years. Automotive User Interface researchers have been investigating issues such as transition control procedures, shared control, (over)trust, and overall user experience in automated vehicles. Now, it is time to open the research field of automated driving to other CHI research fields, such as Human-Robot-Interaction (HRI), aeronautics and space, conversational agents, or smart devices. These communities have been dealing with the interplay between humans and automated systems for more than 30 years. In this workshop, we aim to provide a forum to discuss what can be learnt from other domains for the design of autonomous vehicles. Interaction design problems that occur in these domains, such as transition control procedures, how to build trust in the system, and ethics will be discussed.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2014
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christof Gattringer;
    Project: EC | STRONGNET (238353), FWF | Hadrones in vacuum, nucle... (W 1203), FWF | Hadron Physics from Latti... (I 1452)

    In recent years the complex action problem of lattice field theory at finite density was overcome for several system by mapping them to dual variables (flux lines and surfaces). We illustrate this mapping for the case of the U(1) gauge Higgs system and present some representative physics results for this model. Conceptual challenges such as spectroscopy in the dual approach, as well as algorithmic developments are discussed and related ideas for systems with fermions are addressed. Models where the dual variables approach solves the complex action problem can serve as reference systems for other approaches to finite density lattice field theory and we discuss some examples. Finally we address the strategy of a partial dualization in certain limits, e.g., for strong coupling and large mass.

  • Publication . Conference object . Article . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jelle van Dijk; Niels Hendriks; Christopher Frauenberger; Fenne Verhoeven; Karin Slegers; Eva Brandt; Rita Maldonado Branco;
    Countries: Netherlands, Belgium

    from the article: ABSTRACT Participatory Design has developed methods that empower people with impairments to actively take part in the design process. Many designed artifacts for this target group likewise aim to empower their users in daily life. In this workshop, we share and relate best practices of both empowering methods and empowering designs. Participants are therefore invited to bring along cases of designing for- and with people with sensory-, cognitive- or social impairments. Our workshop consists of three parts: (1) Foregrounding empowering elements in PD methods using method stories, containing the backstory of a method put into practice; (2) Reflecting on technological artifacts, exploring the empowering qualities of person-artifact-context interaction; (3) constructing a critical synopsis of the various relationships between empowering products and -methods. http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2948076.2948101

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