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  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Vlad Demsar; Sean Sands; Sara Rosengren; Colin Campbell;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Abstract Traditionally, advertising relies on creativity to increase its effectiveness. However, little is known about the use of creativity in negatively-valenced situations. For instance, in times of crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic, how should retailers engage in advertising? Should they strive to deliver creative advertising, or not? We investigate the role of ad creativity during times of crisis, based on 43,459 consumer responses to 49 retail and service brand ads. To do so, we investigate the separate effects of the two dimensions of ad creativity: originality and appropriateness. Results indicate that creativity works differently in a crisis context, with originality and appropriateness having different effects on consumers. Further, we find that originality and appropriateness trigger emotions in opposite ways. However, ads that engage thanking - be it of employees, customers, or frontline emergency workers - strengthen these effects.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tobias Mourier; Mukhtar Sadykov; Michael J. Carr; Gabriel Gonzalez; William W. Hall; Arnab Pain;
    Publisher: The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

    The extensive sequence data generated from SARS-CoV-2 during the 2020 pandemic has facilitated the study of viral genome evolution over a brief period of time. This has highlighted instances of directional mutation pressures exerted on the SARS-CoV-2 genome from host antiviral defense systems. In this brief review we describe three such human defense mechanisms, the apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like proteins (APOBEC), adenosine deaminase acting on RNA proteins (ADAR), and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and discuss their potential implications on SARS-CoV-2 evolution.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Massimo Federico; C.S. Chiattone; H. M. Prince; Astrid Pavlovsky; Martina Manni; Monica Civallero; Tetiana Skrypets; C.A. De Souza; Eliza A Hawkes; Lorena Fiad; +10 more
    Publisher: Wiley

    Introduction: Mature T and NK-cell lymphomas represent a heterogeneous group of lymphoid disorders (29 subtypes according to the 2016 WHO classification) arising from mature T cells of post-thymic origin with different morphological characteristics, phenotypes, and clinical presentation. Following the success of the T Cell Project (TCP), which allowed the analysis of more than 1,500 cases of peripheral T-Cell lymphomas (PTCLs) collected prospectively in 18 Countries, in 2018 the TCP 2.0 was launched. Here we report the global distribution of PTCLs, from the cases registered so far based on the locally established histological diagnosis. Methods: The TCP2.0 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03964480) is a prospective, international, observational study which adapts to changes made in the new WHO classification. Results: Since the beginning of the study (October 2018), 648 patients with newly diagnosed PTCL were registered by 75 active centers across 14 countries. Of these data, 594 patients have been validated by the centralized trial office. Overall, PTCL-NOS, Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) ALK-negative, and Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), represent the most frequent subtypes, representing 31.3%, 18,9% and 13,5% of cases, respectively. As reported in Table 1, PTCL-NOS represents the most frequent subtype worldwide, whereas Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma was more frequent in Brazil, AITL and ALCL ALK-negative in Australia/ India, and ALCL ALK-positive in North America and Europe. Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type was relatively frequent in Brazil and quite rare in the other Latin America Countries. Finally, many sub-types represent less than 5% of cases in all geographic areas. Conclusions: The TCP2.0 continues to recruit very well, despite the difficulties linked to the COVID-19 pandemic, and may represent a useful resource for the prospective study of this group of rare lymphomas.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kariem El-Boghdadly; Danny J.N. Wong; Ruth Owen; Mark D. Neuman; Stuart J. Pocock; J. B. Carlisle; C. Johnstone; P. Andruszkiewicz; Paul A. Baker; Bruce M Biccard; +13 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: United Kingdom

    Summary Healthcare workers involved in aerosol‐generating procedures, such as tracheal intubation, may be at elevated risk of acquiring COVID‐19. However, the magnitude of this risk is unknown. We conducted a prospective international multicentre cohort study recruiting healthcare workers participating in tracheal intubation of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID‐19. Information on tracheal intubation episodes, personal protective equipment use, and subsequent provider health status was collected via self‐reporting. The primary endpoint was the incidence of laboratory‐confirmed COVID‐19 diagnosis or new symptoms requiring self‐isolation or hospitalisation after a tracheal intubation episode. Cox regression analysis examined associations between the primary endpoint and healthcare worker characteristics, procedure‐related factors, and personal protective equipment use. Between 23 March and 2 June 2020, 1718 healthcare workers from 503 hospitals in 17 countries reported 5148 tracheal intubation episodes. The overall incidence of the primary endpoint was 10.7% over a median (IQR [range]) follow‐up of 32 (18–48 [0–116]) days. The cumulative incidence within 7, 14 and 21 days of the first tracheal intubation episode was 3.6%, 6.1%, and 8.5%, respectively. The risk of the primary endpoint varied by country and was higher in females, but was not associated with other factors. Around 1 in 10 healthcare workers involved in tracheal intubation of patients with suspected or confirmed COVID‐19 subsequently reported a COVID‐19 outcome. This has human resource implications for institutional capacity to deliver essential healthcare services, and wider societal implications for COVID‐19 transmission.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Luke A. J. O'Neill; Mihai G. Netea;
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group UK
    Country: Netherlands
    Project: EC | Metabinnate (834370), EC | TRAIN-OLD (833247)

    Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination has been reported to decrease susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, an effect proposed to be mediated by the general long-term boosting of innate immune mechanisms, also termed trained immunity. Here, we discuss the non-specific beneficial effects of BCG against viral infections and whether this vaccine may afford protection to COVID-19. Could the BCG vaccine be used to bridge the gap until a specific COVID-19 vaccine is developed? Luke O’Neill and Mihai Netea discuss the science behind this approach.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evelien Dekker; Han-Mo Chiu; Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar; Luis E. Caro; Jason A. Dominitz; Stephen P Halloran; Cesare Hassan; Julia Ismael; Rodrigo Jover; Michal F. Kaminski; +13 more
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Husam M. Salah; Jwan A Naser; Giuseppe Calcaterra; Pier Paolo Bassareo; Jawahar L. Mehta;
    Publisher: Excerpta Medica
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nomi L. Harris; Peter J. A. Cock; Christopher J. Fields; Karsten Hokamp; Jessica Maia; Monica Munoz-Torres; Malvika Sharan; Jason Williams;
    Publisher: F1000 Research Ltd

    The 22nd annual Bioinformatics Open Source Conference (BOSC 2021, open-bio.org/events/bosc-2021/) was held online as a track of the 2021 Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology / European Conference on Computational Biology (ISMB/ECCB) conference. Launched in 2000 and held every year since, BOSC is the premier meeting covering topics related to open source software and open science in bioinformatics. In 2020, BOSC partnered with the Galaxy Community Conference to form the Bioinformatics Community Conference (BCC2020); that was the first BOSC to be held online. This year, BOSC returned to its roots as part of ISMB/ECCB 2021. As in 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic made it impossible to hold the conference in person, so ISMB/ECCB 2021 took place as an online meeting attended by over 2000 people from 79 countries. Nearly 200 people participated in BOSC sessions, which included 27 talks reviewed and selected from submitted abstracts, and three invited keynote talks representing a range of global perspectives on the role of open science and open source in driving research and inclusivity in the biosciences, one of which was presented in French with English subtitles.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Jeffrey C.L. Looi; Tarun Bastiampillai; Stephen Kisely; Stephen Allison;
    Publisher: SAGE Publications

    The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the role of private psychiatry, which responded to the crisis with expanded outpatient/telehealth practice and ongoing private hospital care, complementary to public sector care. Despite the significance of the private sector, it has been largely overlooked in recent reports from the Productivity Commission, the Royal Commission into Victorian Mental Health Services and the Fifth National Mental Health Plan. We highlight research findings that demonstrate the scope and resilience of the private sector in meeting the challenge of the pandemic, as well as previous private–public sector collaborative initiatives that could be revivified.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Robert P. Murphy; Karen Dennehy; Maria Costello; Evelyn P. Murphy; Conor Judge; Martin O'Donnell; Michelle Canavan;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

    Abstract Background During the current COVID-19 health crisis virtual geriatric clinics have become increasingly utilised to complete outpatient consultations, although concerns exist about feasibility of such virtual consultations for older people. The aim of this rapid review is to describe the satisfaction, clinic productivity, clinical benefit, and costs associated with the virtual geriatric clinic model of care. Methods A rapid review of PubMed, MEDLINE and CINAHL databases was conducted up to April 2020. Two independent reviewers extracted the information. Four subdomains were focused on: satisfaction with the virtual geriatric clinic, clinic productivity, clinical benefit to patients, costs and any challenges associated with the virtual clinic process. Results Nine studies with 975 patients met our inclusion criteria. All were observational studies. Seven studies reported patients were satisfied with the virtual geriatric clinic model of care. Productivity outcomes included reports of cost-effectiveness, savings on transport, and improved waiting list metrics. Clinical benefits included successful polypharmacy reviews, and reductions in acute hospitalisation rates. Varying challenges were reported for both clinicians and patients in eight of the nine studies. Hearing impairments and difficulty with technology added to anxieties experienced by patients. Physicians missed the added value of a thorough physical examination and had concerns about confidentiality. Conclusion Virtual geriatric clinics demonstrate evidence of productivity, benefit to patients, cost effectiveness and patient satisfaction with the treatment provided. In the current suboptimal pandemic climate, virtual geriatric clinics may allow Geriatricians to continue to provide an outpatient service, despite the encountered inherent challenges.

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