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40 Research products, page 1 of 4

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  • 2018-2022
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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2019
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school have successfully completed up to the Winter period of 2019. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leavy, Susan; Meaney, Gerardine; Wade, Karen; Greene, Derek;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    International Workshop on Algorithmic Bias in Search and Recommendation (Bias 2020), Lisbon, Portugal (held online due to coronavirus outbreak) 14 April 2020 Algorithmic bias has the capacity to amplify and perpetuate societal bias, and presents profound ethical implications for society. Gender bias in algorithms has been identified in the context of employment advertising and recruitment tools, due to their reliance on underlying language processing and recommendation algorithms. Attempts to address such issues have involved testing learned associations, integrating concepts of fairness to machine learning, and performing more rigorous analysis of training data. Mitigating bias when algorithms are trained on textual data is particularly challenging given the complex way gender ideology is embedded in language. This paper proposes a framework for the identification of gender bias in training data for machine learning. The work draws upon gender theory and sociolinguistics to systematically indicate levels of bias in textual training data and associated neural word embedding models, thus highlighting pathways for both removing bias from training data and critically assessing its impact in the context of search and recommender systems. Irish Research Council Science Foundation Ireland

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Murphy, James;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The School of Culinary Arts and Food Technology, TU Dublin, Autumn Newsletter captured the many events, research, awards, significant contributions and special civic and community activities which the students and staff members of the school across our (3) three campuses have successfully completed up to the Autumn period of 2022. The successful completion of these activities would not be possible without the active and on-going support of the 'INSPIRED' friends of Culinary Arts (school supporters) and our school's industry association supporters.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sweeney, Moira;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This practice-based thesis responds to the absence of documentary film or photographic studies and scholarship that embrace the contrasting experiences of different dock working constituencies in the transforming early twenty-first century space of Dublin Port. It is a filmic investigation into how the experiences and memories of this community of workers in Dublin’s surviving port space shape their urban identity and sense of place, undertaken with regard to the sensuous, haptic qualities of documentary and ethnographic filmmaking. In the ever-shifting world of neoliberalism, its narratives – in relation to labour practices – prioritise faceless markets over the humanity of working life. Therefore, in an attempt to interrogate the lived experiences and memories of working life and how these are central to the shaping of identity, the research is framed within the context of contrasting constituencies within the port community – dockers, crane drivers, stevedores, marine operatives and port managers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Debruyne, Christophe; Munnelly, Gary; Kilgallon, Lynn; O'Sullivan, Declan; Crooks, Peter;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Project: SFI | ADAPT: Centre for Digital... (13/RC/2106), SFI | ADAPT: Centre for Digital... (13/RC/2106)

    This dataset contains a CSV file and an RDF Turtle file. Both files contain information on a few people mentioned in the Irish Exchequer Payments 1270-1326, a book written by Connolly, P and published by the Irish Manuscripts Commission in 1998. A historian transcribed those people in a CSV file, subsequently transformed into RDF using an R2RML mapping. This dataset contains the records and the output of a handful of people transcribed in this way. This dataset illustrates how the Beyond 2022 project avails of CIDOC-CRM to populate its knowledge graph. Beyond 2022 is funded by the Government of Ireland, through the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, under the Project Ireland 2040 framework. The project is also partially supported by the ADAPT Centre for Digital Content Technology under the SFI Research Centres Programme (Grant 13/RC/2106).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eschenfelder, Kristin R.; Shankar, Kalpana;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    iConference 2019, Washington, United States of America, March 31- 3 April 2019 We investigate how the term “business model" was used in the digital cultural heritage literature from 2000 to 2015 through content analysis. We found that discussion of business models is not prevalent and there is no observable growth trend. Analysis of how authors represented business models showed predominately positive uses of the concept but include discussion of tension between the concept of business model and traditional cultural heritage field values. We found that non- element representations of business models were most common. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Garry, Mark;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    This thesis will enable a retrospective critical examination of aspects of my practice as an artist from 2005 - 2020. The research question addresses the implication of multiple forms of inter-reliance enabled in the practice. This will be enabled by opening a discursive space that retrospectively, integrates and critically examines the role and function of inter-reliance as a structural methodology and how this is implicated in the practice over this period. This thesis will use term inter-reliance to define a play of relations where individual art works when viewed in isolation exist only in partial illumination as a form of penumbra. The art works are inchoate as separate entities only becoming activated or fully realised when engaged with collectively and interdiscursively, as a set of enabled relationships. In each of the chapters inter-reliance is manifested as a set of specific enabled reciprocal relationships between artistic mechanisms and physical, perceptual, associative, sonic, contextual and cinematic space. Rather than make art for art’s sake or art that specifically engages with trends or tendencies within the art world, it will elucidate how the practice is relational and empathetic, facilitating an inter-reliance between artist and viewer and artist and society, the practice engages with and reflects upon broader society where articulations of ideological positions are subtly embedded.

  • Other research product . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Warren, Graeme; McDermott, Conor; Seaver, Matthew;
    Publisher: Irish Quaternary Association
    Country: Ireland

    The 20th INQUA Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 25-31 July 2019 Glendalough is one of Ireland’s most iconic landscapes, combining stunning scenery with evocative ruined architecture, including distinctively Irish styles such as the round tower. The popular understanding of the valley’s history is that Saint Kevin retreated into the wilderness where he could be closer to God, and that there he founded his monastery which rose to a position of pre-dominance before subsequent decline. This is a powerful story, appealing to important myths about the nature of early Irish Christianity and with a complex relationship with Irish cultural nationalism. However, it is only a partial understanding of the long-term history of how humans have settled the spectacular valley of Glendalough. Glendalough is also often viewed as a natural landscape, but its form is an outcome of the long-term interaction between people and their environment. This brief outline, and fieldtrip, offers a more holistic perspective on this remarkable landscape. Wicklow County Council

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Soro, Tommie;
    Publisher: Technological University Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    The bases of artistic reputation have been widely debated within the sociology of art and art history. Remarkably, however, little has been said of the role discourse might play in the construction of artistic reputation. An obstacle to addressing this research gap is that discourse analytic approaches have been developed to analyse evaluation and the construction of legitimacy but not the construction of reputation. Attending first to this research gap in discourse analysis, the thesis combines Field Theory and Discourse Analysis to develop a Discursive Field Approach that can analyse the discursive construction of reputation in a cultural field. Using this approach, the thesis attends to the research gap in the literature on artistic reputation by addressing the research question: How is reputation constructed through discourse in the field of online contemporary art magazines? This breaks down into the following sub questions: How do OCAMs acquire the capacity to discursively construct reputation? How is the discursive construction of reputation by OCAMs regulated? How is reputation linguistically constructed by OCAMs? How do OCAMs propose the value of different symbolic resources within the artworld? And, how do internal and external structures in the field of OCAMs affect OCAMs’ construction of reputation? This thesis proposes that online contemporary art magazines acquire the capacity to construct reputation through the possession of key symbolic resources and their use of communication technologies, that their construction of reputation is regulated by field-specific norms, that they linguistically construct reputation through performative statements and supporting linguistic devices, and that the opposition between cultural and commercial discursive practices in the field of online contemporary art magazines comes to bear on the value of different symbolic resources in the artworld and the artworld’s relationships to legitimating fields.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lowney, Brydon; Lokmer, Ivan; Bean, Christopher J.; O'Brien, G. S.; Igoe, M.;
    Publisher: EAGE Publications BV
    Country: Ireland

    80th EAGE Conference & Exhibition 2018, Copenhagen, Denmark, 11-14 June 2018 A seismic image is formed by interactions of the seismic wavefield with geological interfaces, in the form of reflections, diffractions, and other coherent noise. While in conventional processing workflows reflections are favoured over diffractions, this is only beneficial in areas with uniform stratigraphy. Diffractions form as interactions of the wavefield with discontinuities and therefore can be used to image them. However, to image diffractions, they must first be separated from the seismic wavefield. Here we propose a pattern recognition approach for separation, employing image segmentation. We then compare this to two existing diffraction imaging methods, plane-wave destruction and f-k filtering. Image segmentation can be used to divide the image into pixels which share certain criteria. Here, we have separated the image first by amplitude using a histogram-based segmentation method, followed by edge detection with a Sobel operator to locate the hyperbola. The image segmentation method successfully locates diffraction hyperbola which can then be separated and migrated for diffraction imaging. When compared with plane-wave destruction and f-k filtering, the image segmentation method proves beneficial as it allows for identification of the hyperbolae without noise. However, the method can fail to identify hyperbolae in noisier environments and when hyperbolae overlap. Science Foundation Ireland Could not determine copyright holder so left blank - AC

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