Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
995 Research products, page 1 of 100

  • Research data
  • Other research products
  • US
  • SK
  • COVID-19

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hamilton Winkelman, Charles;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    The game is set on a college campus and starts with the player having an exposure to someone infected with COVID-19. The player then has to make decisions about what to after their exposure.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karamba, Wendy; Nkengene, Clarence Tsimpo; Tong, Kimsun;
    Publisher: World Bank, Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    This brief summarizes the findings of the first round of a nationally representative high-frequency phone survey (HFPS) of households. The HFPS sample is drawn from the nationally representative living standard measurement study plus (LSMS+) implemented October to December 2019 by the National Institute of Statistics (NIS) with technical and financial support from the World Bank. The HFPS followed up with 1,364 households in LSMS+ with a phone number. The phone survey was successfully completed for 700 households for a response rate of 51 percent. Sampling weights were adjusted to ensure that the sample remains representative at the national and subnational level (urban and rural areas). The same households will be tracked over 10 months, with selected respondents - typically the household head - completing interviews every 8 weeks. Monitoring the well-being of households over time will improve understanding of the effects of, and household responses to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in near-real time.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank;
    Publisher: Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    All countries across South Asia, faced with the rising risks of COVID-19 infection rates, implemented severe economic lockdowns in early 2020 with varying frequencies and time periods. While the exact nature and duration of these lockdowns varied across countries in the South Asia Region (SAR), almost all SAR countries imposed their first economic lockdown in late March 2020 in response to the growing health threat of COVID-19 infections. In India, for instance, the national lockdown was first introduced in late March 2020, which coincided with the imposition of similar lockdowns in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, followed by a national lockdown in Pakistan on April 1, 2020. By April 17, 2020, the population of all SAR countries was under severe lockdown with varying rules and conditions based on national or local directives. The introduction of these lockdowns led to a drastic, abrupt disruption in all forms of physical mobility and economic activities. Trends from the Google COVID-19 Community Mobility data reveal this sharp drop in day-to-day mobility related to four different types of economic activity across 6 out of 8 SAR countries for which this data was available. Figure 1 plots the daily change in the Google Mobility index, which is constructed by taking an equally weighted mean across the four dimensions of economic activity for the five weeks before March 2020. In the six SAR countries, the average mobility remained approximately, on average, 58 percent below their respective pre-COVID levels during the first week of the lockdown. For example, in Nepal, where the lockdown was first introduced on March 24, 2020, mobility (as measured by the Google Mobility index) was 66 percent below pre-COVID levels on the first day of the lockdown; and it remained, on average, 71.5 percent below per-COVID levels between March 24, 2020, and March 30, 2020. We observe a similar pattern of immediate and large disruptions in mobility in all SAR countries, except in Afghanistan (22.5 percent below pre-COVID levels), where restrictions were more localized. The Google Mobility index closely follows these changes in rules and conditions in SAR countries, which varied over time within each country as well as across countries. In countries like Nepal, India, and Sri Lanka, with an extended period of restrictions imposed through national or local directives at different points in time, mobility had not returned to pre-COVID levels even as late as April 2021. In Nepal and Sri Lanka, where the second lockdown was introduced in August and November 2020, respectively, we observe a sharp drop again in mobility after a gradual recovery following the easing of the first lockdown. In other SAR countries like Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, mobility only returned to pre-COVID levels between September and October 2020. These results underscore the dramatic and prolonged impact that COVID-19 induced lockdowns have had on mobility and economic activity, which is perhaps unprecedented in the region, at least in recent history4. These lockdowns are likely to have important implications on various socio-economic dimensions of welfare, including labor market outcomes, both immediately and in the medium, to long-term. More importantly, the long-term impacts will also be determined by the nature and the pace of recovery observed in these countries in the months and years after the initial phase of lockdown. Moreover, the emergence of new mutants leaves open the possibility of future lockdowns as a policy response to mitigate the health effects of the virus, which could impact economic activity and reverse observed recoveries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank;
    Publisher: Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    Small island developing states and small tourism-dependent coastal states have been the most gravely impacted by global climate and Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic crises and are expected to face even greater economic and social challenges in the years to come. While information and research on sustainable and blue tourism in small island developing states (SIDS) does exist, it is hard to find, difficult to analyze, and challenging to turn into policy guidance. This guidance note is a synthesis of findings from a literature review of the inventory of blue tourism resources, consumer market research, and tourism trend monitoring undertaken by the World Bank global tourism team since the start of COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ary, Beatrice Elisabeth;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    Cells have evolved proteins that detect foreign DNA, RNA, or proteins which then activate cellular pathways to combat bacterial or viral infection.1–4 Apolipoprotein B editing complex 3 (APOBEC3 or A3) is a host cytidine deaminase that deaminates cytidine to uridine in viral DNA in the cytoplasm causing hyper G→A mutation leading to destabilization and degradation of the viral genome.5–8 HIV viral infectivity factor (vif) has evolved to regulate A3 degradation of viral DNA.9 Vif hijacks host ubiquitination machinery to degrade A3s and prevent packaging of A3 into the viral particle.10,11 Vif hijacks the cotranscription factor core factor binding unit beta (CBF-beta), Elongin B (ELOB) and Elongin C (ELOC) to form the VCBC complex.12–15 VCBC binds A3s and Cullin 5 (Cul5) for ubiquitination and degradation of A3 thereby preventing packaging.12,16 Antigen binding fragments (Fabs) were generated against VCBC using a naïve B-cell Fab phage display library to isolate biological tools that are specific for the host-virus interaction.17 Two high affinity Fabs were found to bind at distinct epitopes on VCBC and produced distinct phenotypes when expressed in cells as single chain variable fragments (scFvs).17 The Fab 3C9 shields A3F from ubiquitination and restores packaging of A3F into the viral particle. The Fab 1D1 blocks binding of Cul5 and ubiquitination in vitro. The scFv 1D1 prevented ubiquitination of A3F but did not restore packaging. Affinity purification mass spectroscopy (AP-MS) in HEK293Ts with 3C9 scFv and 1D1 scFv showed different interactomes in the presence of vif. AP-MS with 1D1 scFv did not interact with CBF-beta, an important component of the VCBC complex. Spatial and temporal elucidation of proteins interacting with the complex will further determine events effecting viral infectivity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank Group;
    Publisher: World Bank, Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    State of the economy: In 2019 growth in Tanzania’s economy was again solid, but this year COVID-19is expected to cut GDP growth at least in half and increase poverty. Growth slowdown in Tanzania’smain trade partners has reduced demand and prices for its agricultural commodities and final manufactured goods, and international travel bans and fear of contracting the virus are expected to inhibit the recovery of tourism, which has been one of the fastest-growing sectors in the economy. Domestic business conditions are expected to deteriorate. The current outlook is highly uncertain,and risks are tilted to the downside especially if global demand remains suppressed or government actions are not strong, well-targeted or sustained. The risks for a more negative growthoutlook than the baseline described above are high. Under a severe local outbreak, Tanzania’s health care system would become heavily strained, and self-imposed social distancing could dampenmuch of the economy. This would likely lead to a delayed economic recovery, and Tanzania would face continued pressures to finance additional health spending to save lives and providesupport to protect livelihoods. Even if the outbreak is contained in Tanzania, a protracted/resurging global health crisis that continues in 2021 could undermine global demand, and thus, the Tanzanian economy. Furthermore, even if the global health crisis is contained and Tanzania’s COVID-19 reported cases also decrease, additional trade and logistics restrictionscould continue disrupting global trade during the recovery. Tanzania’s macroeconomic performance has been strong for the last decade, but the current crisis is an unprecedented shock that requires strong, well-targeted and sustained policy response.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borges do Nascimento, Israel Júnior et al.;

    A growing body of literature on the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is becoming available, but a synthesis of available data has not been conducted. We performed a scoping review of currently available clinical, epidemiological, laboratory, and chest imaging data related to the SARS-CoV-2 infection. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Scopus and LILACS from 01 January 2019 to 24 February 2020. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed by two independent reviewers. Qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis were conducted using the clinical and laboratory data, and random-e ects models were applied to estimate pooled results. A total of 61 studies were included (59,254 patients). The most common disease-related symptoms were fever (82%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 56%–99%; n = 4410), cough (61%, 95% CI 39%–81%; n = 3985), muscle aches and/or fatigue (36%, 95% CI 18%–55%; n = 3778), dyspnea (26%, 95% CI 12%–41%; n = 3700), headache in 12% (95% CI 4%–23%, n = 3598 patients), sore throat in 10% (95% CI 5%–17%, n = 1387) and gastrointestinal symptoms in 9% (95% CI 3%–17%, n=1744). Laboratory findings were described in a lower number of patients and revealed lymphopenia (0.93 109/L, 95% CI 0.83–1.03 109/L, n = 464) and abnormal C-reactive protein (33.72 mg/dL, 95% CI 21.54–45.91 mg/dL; n = 1637). Radiological findings varied, but mostly described ground-glass opacities and consolidation. Data on treatment options were limited. All-cause mortality was 0.3% (95% CI 0.0%–1.0%; n = 53,631). Epidemiological studies showed that mortality was higher in males and elderly patients. The majority of reported clinical symptoms and laboratory findings related to SARS-CoV-2 infection are non-specific. Clinical suspicion, accompanied by a relevant epidemiological history, should be followed by early imaging and virological assay.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Huneeus, Federico; Kaboski, Joseph P.; Larrain, Mauricio; Schmukler, Sergio L.; Vera, Mario;
    Publisher: Washington, DC: World Bank
    Country: United States

    This paper studies the distribution of credit during crisis times and its impact on firm indebtedness and macroeconomic risk. Whereas policies can help firms in need of financing, they can lead to adverse selection from riskier firms and higher default risk. The paper analyzes a large-scale program of public credit guarantees in Chile during the COVID-19 pandemic using unique transaction-level data on the demand and supply of credit, matched with administrative tax data, for the universe of banks and firms. Credit demand channels loans toward riskier firms, distributing 4.6 percent of gross domestic product and increasing firm leverage. Despite increased lending to riskier firms, macroeconomic risks remain small. Several factors mitigate aggregate risk: the small weight of riskier firms, the exclusion of the riskiest firms, bank screening, contained expected defaults, and the government absorption of tail risk. The empirical findings are confirmed with a model of heterogeneous firms and endogenous default.

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Virginia Tech
    Country: United States

    The university's flagship publication, Virginia Tech Magazine, forges stronger relationships among alumni, donors, and friends of Virginia Tech. Featured in this issue: Water Matters As the population around the globe continues to grow and the effects of climate change become more far-reaching, water stress is a growing concern. Across Virginia Tech's campuses, leaders and scientists are developing strategies to protect and preserve this valuable resource. Out of Office The COVID-19 pandemic triggered changes to the workplace. Employers and employees are adapting to a new normal that includes increased opportunities for remote and hybrid work as well as changes in job recruitment methods and team interactions. Virginia Tech Foundation

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roth, Evelyn;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation aims to contribute new terminology to the field by introducing discourse neologism to the lexicological and lexicographical approaches in the field of a discourse-related lexicon. The term describes a neologism that uses the discourse as an element of word-formation. The idea originates from the emergence of two COVID-19 discourse glossaries by two major German lexical institutes, from which a corpus was selected, including all the terms that could be identified as discourse neologism. In this dissertation, the semantic, semiotic and grammatical features of the discourse neologism are discussed with the examples from the corpus in order to make concluding statements on their nature and application.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
995 Research products, page 1 of 100
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hamilton Winkelman, Charles;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    The game is set on a college campus and starts with the player having an exposure to someone infected with COVID-19. The player then has to make decisions about what to after their exposure.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Karamba, Wendy; Nkengene, Clarence Tsimpo; Tong, Kimsun;
    Publisher: World Bank, Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    This brief summarizes the findings of the first round of a nationally representative high-frequency phone survey (HFPS) of households. The HFPS sample is drawn from the nationally representative living standard measurement study plus (LSMS+) implemented October to December 2019 by the National Institute of Statistics (NIS) with technical and financial support from the World Bank. The HFPS followed up with 1,364 households in LSMS+ with a phone number. The phone survey was successfully completed for 700 households for a response rate of 51 percent. Sampling weights were adjusted to ensure that the sample remains representative at the national and subnational level (urban and rural areas). The same households will be tracked over 10 months, with selected respondents - typically the household head - completing interviews every 8 weeks. Monitoring the well-being of households over time will improve understanding of the effects of, and household responses to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in near-real time.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank;
    Publisher: Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    All countries across South Asia, faced with the rising risks of COVID-19 infection rates, implemented severe economic lockdowns in early 2020 with varying frequencies and time periods. While the exact nature and duration of these lockdowns varied across countries in the South Asia Region (SAR), almost all SAR countries imposed their first economic lockdown in late March 2020 in response to the growing health threat of COVID-19 infections. In India, for instance, the national lockdown was first introduced in late March 2020, which coincided with the imposition of similar lockdowns in Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka, followed by a national lockdown in Pakistan on April 1, 2020. By April 17, 2020, the population of all SAR countries was under severe lockdown with varying rules and conditions based on national or local directives. The introduction of these lockdowns led to a drastic, abrupt disruption in all forms of physical mobility and economic activities. Trends from the Google COVID-19 Community Mobility data reveal this sharp drop in day-to-day mobility related to four different types of economic activity across 6 out of 8 SAR countries for which this data was available. Figure 1 plots the daily change in the Google Mobility index, which is constructed by taking an equally weighted mean across the four dimensions of economic activity for the five weeks before March 2020. In the six SAR countries, the average mobility remained approximately, on average, 58 percent below their respective pre-COVID levels during the first week of the lockdown. For example, in Nepal, where the lockdown was first introduced on March 24, 2020, mobility (as measured by the Google Mobility index) was 66 percent below pre-COVID levels on the first day of the lockdown; and it remained, on average, 71.5 percent below per-COVID levels between March 24, 2020, and March 30, 2020. We observe a similar pattern of immediate and large disruptions in mobility in all SAR countries, except in Afghanistan (22.5 percent below pre-COVID levels), where restrictions were more localized. The Google Mobility index closely follows these changes in rules and conditions in SAR countries, which varied over time within each country as well as across countries. In countries like Nepal, India, and Sri Lanka, with an extended period of restrictions imposed through national or local directives at different points in time, mobility had not returned to pre-COVID levels even as late as April 2021. In Nepal and Sri Lanka, where the second lockdown was introduced in August and November 2020, respectively, we observe a sharp drop again in mobility after a gradual recovery following the easing of the first lockdown. In other SAR countries like Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, mobility only returned to pre-COVID levels between September and October 2020. These results underscore the dramatic and prolonged impact that COVID-19 induced lockdowns have had on mobility and economic activity, which is perhaps unprecedented in the region, at least in recent history4. These lockdowns are likely to have important implications on various socio-economic dimensions of welfare, including labor market outcomes, both immediately and in the medium, to long-term. More importantly, the long-term impacts will also be determined by the nature and the pace of recovery observed in these countries in the months and years after the initial phase of lockdown. Moreover, the emergence of new mutants leaves open the possibility of future lockdowns as a policy response to mitigate the health effects of the virus, which could impact economic activity and reverse observed recoveries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank;
    Publisher: Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    Small island developing states and small tourism-dependent coastal states have been the most gravely impacted by global climate and Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic crises and are expected to face even greater economic and social challenges in the years to come. While information and research on sustainable and blue tourism in small island developing states (SIDS) does exist, it is hard to find, difficult to analyze, and challenging to turn into policy guidance. This guidance note is a synthesis of findings from a literature review of the inventory of blue tourism resources, consumer market research, and tourism trend monitoring undertaken by the World Bank global tourism team since the start of COVID-19.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ary, Beatrice Elisabeth;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    Cells have evolved proteins that detect foreign DNA, RNA, or proteins which then activate cellular pathways to combat bacterial or viral infection.1–4 Apolipoprotein B editing complex 3 (APOBEC3 or A3) is a host cytidine deaminase that deaminates cytidine to uridine in viral DNA in the cytoplasm causing hyper G→A mutation leading to destabilization and degradation of the viral genome.5–8 HIV viral infectivity factor (vif) has evolved to regulate A3 degradation of viral DNA.9 Vif hijacks host ubiquitination machinery to degrade A3s and prevent packaging of A3 into the viral particle.10,11 Vif hijacks the cotranscription factor core factor binding unit beta (CBF-beta), Elongin B (ELOB) and Elongin C (ELOC) to form the VCBC complex.12–15 VCBC binds A3s and Cullin 5 (Cul5) for ubiquitination and degradation of A3 thereby preventing packaging.12,16 Antigen binding fragments (Fabs) were generated against VCBC using a naïve B-cell Fab phage display library to isolate biological tools that are specific for the host-virus interaction.17 Two high affinity Fabs were found to bind at distinct epitopes on VCBC and produced distinct phenotypes when expressed in cells as single chain variable fragments (scFvs).17 The Fab 3C9 shields A3F from ubiquitination and restores packaging of A3F into the viral particle. The Fab 1D1 blocks binding of Cul5 and ubiquitination in vitro. The scFv 1D1 prevented ubiquitination of A3F but did not restore packaging. Affinity purification mass spectroscopy (AP-MS) in HEK293Ts with 3C9 scFv and 1D1 scFv showed different interactomes in the presence of vif. AP-MS with 1D1 scFv did not interact with CBF-beta, an important component of the VCBC complex. Spatial and temporal elucidation of proteins interacting with the complex will further determine events effecting viral infectivity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    World Bank Group;
    Publisher: World Bank, Washington, DC
    Country: United States

    State of the economy: In 2019 growth in Tanzania’s economy was again solid, but this year COVID-19is expected to cut GDP growth at least in half and increase poverty. Growth slowdown in Tanzania’smain trade partners has reduced demand and prices for its agricultural commodities and final manufactured goods, and international travel bans and fear of contracting the virus are expected to inhibit the recovery of tourism, which has been one of the fastest-growing sectors in the economy. Domestic business conditions are expected to deteriorate. The current outlook is highly uncertain,and risks are tilted to the downside especially if global demand remains suppressed or government actions are not strong, well-targeted or sustained. The risks for a more negative growthoutlook than the baseline described above are high. Under a severe local outbreak, Tanzania’s health care system would become heavily strained, and self-imposed social distancing could dampenmuch of the economy. This would likely lead to a delayed economic recovery, and Tanzania would face continued pressures to finance additional health spending to save lives and providesupport to protect livelihoods. Even if the outbreak is contained in Tanzania, a protracted/resurging global health crisis that continues in 2021 could undermine global demand, and thus, the Tanzanian economy. Furthermore, even if the global health crisis is contained and Tanzania’s COVID-19 reported cases also decrease, additional trade and logistics restrictionscould continue disrupting global trade during the recovery. Tanzania’s macroeconomic performance has been strong for the last decade, but the current crisis is an unprecedented shock that requires strong, well-targeted and sustained policy response.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borges do Nascimento, Israel Júnior et al.;

    A growing body of literature on the 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is becoming available, but a synthesis of available data has not been conducted. We performed a scoping review of currently available clinical, epidemiological, laboratory, and chest imaging data related to the SARS-CoV-2 infection. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane CENTRAL, EMBASE, Scopus and LILACS from 01 January 2019 to 24 February 2020. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed by two independent reviewers. Qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis were conducted using the clinical and laboratory data, and random-e ects models were applied to estimate pooled results. A total of 61 studies were included (59,254 patients). The most common disease-related symptoms were fever (82%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 56%–99%; n = 4410), cough (61%, 95% CI 39%–81%; n = 3985), muscle aches and/or fatigue (36%, 95% CI 18%–55%; n = 3778), dyspnea (26%, 95% CI 12%–41%; n = 3700), headache in 12% (95% CI 4%–23%, n = 3598 patients), sore throat in 10% (95% CI 5%–17%, n = 1387) and gastrointestinal symptoms in 9% (95% CI 3%–17%, n=1744). Laboratory findings were described in a lower number of patients and revealed lymphopenia (0.93 109/L, 95% CI 0.83–1.03 109/L, n = 464) and abnormal C-reactive protein (33.72 mg/dL, 95% CI 21.54–45.91 mg/dL; n = 1637). Radiological findings varied, but mostly described ground-glass opacities and consolidation. Data on treatment options were limited. All-cause mortality was 0.3% (95% CI 0.0%–1.0%; n = 53,631). Epidemiological studies showed that mortality was higher in males and elderly patients. The majority of reported clinical symptoms and laboratory findings related to SARS-CoV-2 infection are non-specific. Clinical suspicion, accompanied by a relevant epidemiological history, should be followed by early imaging and virological assay.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Huneeus, Federico; Kaboski, Joseph P.; Larrain, Mauricio; Schmukler, Sergio L.; Vera, Mario;
    Publisher: Washington, DC: World Bank
    Country: United States

    This paper studies the distribution of credit during crisis times and its impact on firm indebtedness and macroeconomic risk. Whereas policies can help firms in need of financing, they can lead to adverse selection from riskier firms and higher default risk. The paper analyzes a large-scale program of public credit guarantees in Chile during the COVID-19 pandemic using unique transaction-level data on the demand and supply of credit, matched with administrative tax data, for the universe of banks and firms. Credit demand channels loans toward riskier firms, distributing 4.6 percent of gross domestic product and increasing firm leverage. Despite increased lending to riskier firms, macroeconomic risks remain small. Several factors mitigate aggregate risk: the small weight of riskier firms, the exclusion of the riskiest firms, bank screening, contained expected defaults, and the government absorption of tail risk. The empirical findings are confirmed with a model of heterogeneous firms and endogenous default.

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Virginia Tech
    Country: United States

    The university's flagship publication, Virginia Tech Magazine, forges stronger relationships among alumni, donors, and friends of Virginia Tech. Featured in this issue: Water Matters As the population around the globe continues to grow and the effects of climate change become more far-reaching, water stress is a growing concern. Across Virginia Tech's campuses, leaders and scientists are developing strategies to protect and preserve this valuable resource. Out of Office The COVID-19 pandemic triggered changes to the workplace. Employers and employees are adapting to a new normal that includes increased opportunities for remote and hybrid work as well as changes in job recruitment methods and team interactions. Virginia Tech Foundation

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roth, Evelyn;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation aims to contribute new terminology to the field by introducing discourse neologism to the lexicological and lexicographical approaches in the field of a discourse-related lexicon. The term describes a neologism that uses the discourse as an element of word-formation. The idea originates from the emergence of two COVID-19 discourse glossaries by two major German lexical institutes, from which a corpus was selected, including all the terms that could be identified as discourse neologism. In this dissertation, the semantic, semiotic and grammatical features of the discourse neologism are discussed with the examples from the corpus in order to make concluding statements on their nature and application.

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.