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190 Research products, page 1 of 19

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    N. Freire; P. Calado; B. Martins;
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    R. Gurinovich; A. Pashuk; Y. Petrovskiy; A. Dmitrievskij; O. Kuryan; A. Scerbacov; A. Tiggre; E. Moroz; Y. Nikolsky;

    The number of published findings in biomedicine increases continually. At the same time, specifics of the domain's terminology complicates the task of relevant publications retrieval. In the current research, we investigate influence of terms' variability and ambiguity on a paper's likelihood of being retrieved. We obtained statistics that demonstrate significance of the issue and its challenges, followed by presenting the sci.AI platform, which allows precise terms labeling as a resolution.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    K. Wilson; A. Kiuna; R. Lamptey; S. Veldsman; L. Montgomery; C. Neylon; R. Hosking; K. Huang; A. Ozaygen;

    This paper discusses research undertaken by the Curtin Open Knowledge Initiative (COKI) andparticipants during and following an Open Knowledge international workshop held in Mauritiusin September 2019. The workshop brought together key experts to explore the role of openknowledge in the creation of equitable and inclusive global knowledge landscapes. This paperexplores the role of open access and institutional repositories in knowledge sharing and thedissemination of research output from higher education and research institutions within theAfrican continent. The paper reviews the landscape of research output from the Africancontinent; analyses open access research output, overviews of institutional knowledge sharingpositions and the dissemination of research output from Ghana, Rwanda, South Africa andUganda.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    S. Andersson; A. Svensson;
    Publisher: IOS Press BV

    Recently the technological and organizational infrastructures of institutional repositories have been questioned. For example, the British so-called Finch report from last summer argued that further development, as well as higher standards of accessibility of repositories, are needed in order to make them better integrated and interoperable to ultimately bring greater use by both authors and readers. Not only the technical frameworks and presumably low usage levels are criticized but also the lack of “clear policies on such matters as the content they will accept, the uses to which it may be put, and the role that they will play in preservation”. The report concludes that: “In practice patterns of deposit are patchy.” As in the UK, today, all universities and university colleges in Sweden, except a couple of very small and specialized ones, do have an institutional repository. A majority (around 80%) are working together on a co-operative basis within the DiVA Publishing System with the Electronic Publishing Centre at Uppsala University Library acting as the technical and organizational hub. Because the system is jointly funded, and the members contribute according to their size, it has been possible even for smaller institutions with limited resources to run a repository with exactly the same functionalities as the biggest universities. In this presentation we want to demonstrate the ever-increasing importance of institutional repositories in Sweden. Starting more than a decade ago the DiVA Consortium has, for some time, been addressing the problems now raised by the Finch report in a number of areas.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    B. Schmidt; P. Calarco; I. Kuchma; K. Shearer;

    On the one hand, libraries are at the forefront of the digital transformation and digital information infrastructures, on the other, they manage and curate cultural heritage collections. This brings about new ways of engagement with information and knowledge and the need to rethink skills and competency profiles – which enable librarians to support e-research all along the research cycle. This paper presents findings of the joint Task Force on Librarians' Competencies in Support of E-Research and Scholarly Communication.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    D. Albornoz; A. Posada; A. Okune; R. Hillyer; L. Chan;

    The OCSDNet Manifesto is a result of one year of participatory consultations and debates amongst members of the ‘Open and Collaborative Science in Development Network’ (OCSDNet), a network of 12 research-practitioner teams from Latin America, Africa, the Middle East and Asia. Through research projects grounded in diverse regions and disciplines, OCSDNet members explore the scope of Open Science as a transformative tool for development thinking and practice and offer the ‘Open and Collaborative Science Manifesto’ as a foundation upon which to reclaim the mainstream narrative about what Open Science means and how it can realise a more inclusive science in development. This paper describes the mechanisms used for collaboration and consensus building, and explores the ways in which the process of building this document serves as a case study for the opportunities and limitations of integrating collaboration, opportunities for participation and openness into research activities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    H. Roued-Cunliffe;
    Publisher: IOS Press BV

    Currently the trend in digital publishing of Humanities data seems to be movingtowards openness and interoperability [1]. In this abstract I will examine to what extentand in what way current digital publications are open and accessible. My hypothesis isthat while many digital publications are currently made available online and can besearched and viewed by the general public, very few are available to researchers in ameaningful way. By meaningful I mean that external researchers can search and exportdata for reuse and are possibly even encouraged to define their own search criteria. Ibelieve that this is the true essence of data sharing [2].Following this, I will propose one approach, using XML and Web Services, tocreating a digital publication of Humanities data that would be open to the researchcommunity in a meaningful way, as defined above.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    B. Wallin; E. Maceviciute;
    Publisher: IOS Press

    One of the consequences of the “small language” phenomenon is that the Swedish book industry is prey to the negative effects of globalization, since books have an international market and a Swedish multilingual citizen can buy e-books from international online booksellers. Publications in the local language are potentially in competition with books in English, and a local publisher or bookseller is competing with international publishers and Amazon.com

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    O. Sacco; G. Yannakakis;

    The purpose of this paper is to set the scene for further twofold exploratory studies: first, inexamining what type of game designs are suitable for digital libraries to motivate both producingand consuming library content in order to offer a personalised experience to using digitallibraries, and second, in exploring how to leverage Semantic Web technologies to createpersonalised digital games (including VR and AR applications) for using digital librariesgenerated from various open and linked datasets. We are providing an overview of theTowards Semantic Digital Games for Semantic Digital Libraries development of games and semantic technologies as a basis for a better understanding of the roleof games in current digital resources provision

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    D. Diouf;

    Traditionally, universities in the North as well as in the Global South concentrated their activities on two main missions: Teaching and Research. A “third mission” of universities called “service to the community”, defined as its social responsibility to contribute to development, is now promoted to researchers [1] [2] [3]. Several studies have shown that scientific and local knowledge play an important role in the process of sustainable development by creating an operational interface between researchers, students and non-profit organizations [4] [5] [6]. In order to fully accomplish this mission for the benefit of local communities, researchers are getting involved in Science shops, which were established in the Netherlands in the 1970's. Glen Millot [15] speaks of “third sectors” in reference to the role Science Shop plays. Indeed, Science shops are dynamic mediators of cooperation between communities, NGOs, citizens and researchers. Science Shos teams receive demands from civil society or organizations and helps translate them into research programs or scientific issues that students and researchers treat and make the results available to communities. This presentation will firstly focus on a definition of some useful concepts. Then, the second part will deal with the origin of Science Shops and their evolution before analyzing the process of setting up the UCAD Science Shop “Xam-xamu niep ngir niep” (Knowledge of all for all).

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