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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    We have before us the sixth issue of INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology. This is the second issue in a row dedicated to the global crisis caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. After the overwhelming response from all over the world to the call for papers and provocative inspections that ensued, here we wanted to discuss the ways in which technology shapes and enables work in the areas of music, arts, humanities, and the education process, this time inviting our collaborators to discuss the shortcomings and struggles of the working processes in these fields. The main theme, “Music, Art and Humanities in the Time of Global Crisis”, expanded from the Main Theme section into the interviews as well.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chatterjee, Avishek; Nardi, Cosimo; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: Searching through the COVID-19 research literature to gain actionable clinical insight is a formidable task, even for experts. The usefulness of this corpus in terms of improving patient care is tied to the ability to see the big picture that emerges when the studies are seen in conjunction rather than in isolation. When the answer to a search query requires linking together multiple pieces of information across documents, simple keyword searches are insufficient. To answer such complex information needs, an innovative artificial intelligence (AI) technology named a knowledge graph (KG) could prove to be effective. Methods: We conducted an exploratory literature review of KG applications in the context of COVID-19. The search term used was "covid-19 knowledge graph". In addition to PubMed, the first five pages of search results for Google Scholar and Google were considered for inclusion. Google Scholar was used to include non-peer-reviewed or non-indexed articles such as pre-prints and conference proceedings. Google was used to identify companies or consortiums active in this domain that have not published any literature, peer-reviewed or otherwise. Results: Our search yielded 34 results on PubMed and 50 results each on Google and Google Scholar. We found KGs being used for facilitating literature search, drug repurposing, clinical trial mapping, and risk factor analysis. Conclusions: Our synopses of these works make a compelling case for the utility of this nascent field of research.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    In the seventh issue of INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology, we are continuing our series on themes dedicated to art, music, and humanities in times of global crisis. After dealing with more general questions regarding these areas of creation, in this volume we are thinking about the issue of mental and bodily health during the Covid-19 pandemic and its possible ties and representations in music and art.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KHiO
    Country: Norway

    A 6 flyer-set (1HEX): #01—attempt; #02—try again; #03—do something else; #04—return; #05—unlearn; #06—crossover. In this flyer-series, content is queried as a vectored relationship between image and writing. The reference framework is Samuel Beckett’s queries in the “novellas” Ill Seen Ill Said/Company/ Worstward Ho/Stirrings Still (FF—faber & faber). The concept of excavation determines the hatching of content through a work of staging: the performed container. A ontological status is ascribed to such containers: they feature a category of dis/play which is neither an exhibit, nor a show. The lineup (Germ. Ausstellung, Norw. Oppstilling) is discussed as a dis/play in which the nature of what is seen and said is yet undetermined, or uncertain. From this basis the notion that the Beckett estate clusters the signature, event and context—rather than being external to Beckett’s work—is suggested. From this ground the possibility that Covid19 (pandemic and the lockdown as life-work) can fruitfully be considered an estate, is tentatively demonstrated and argued, from the vantage point of terrestrial estates, that may hatch and develop in the wake of Bruno Latour’s work, and Donna Haraway’s scheme of staying with the trouble. Which is also why the geological time-frame (cf, anthropocene) is discussed. Hereby, the /Covid-19 estate/ is launched.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, Mccarthy; Delepine, Ludovic; Deschamps, Étienne;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Venzon, Aldreen;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    ABSTRACTObjectives: We aimed to understand the public perception of COVID-19 vaccines using survey and Twitter data. For the survey study, we focused on examining the COVID-19 vaccine perspectives of the rural population in the Central Valley of California, which was predominantly Latinx. Specifically, we looked at the level of trust in the source and content of the vaccine information they received, their view of the safety and effectiveness of vaccines, and their accessibility to vaccines and information at the time when vaccines were readily available to the public. For the Twitter study, we focused on metropolitan and nonmetropolitan communities in the United States and examined tweet sentiment and emotion scores in the early stage of the pandemic and through the public release of the first COVID-19 vaccines. Methods: For the survey data, a total of 900 survey responses were collected in two rural counties in the State of California from March 30 to April 25, 2021. The survey was offered via web and phone in English, Spanish, Punjabi, and Hmong. The respondents were asked about their perceptions of COVID-19 vaccines, messaging, and sources of information. For the Twitter data, we used 127,648 tweets for the analysis after data cleaning, reverse geocoding of tweets, and assigning geographical designations to compare public perception between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. We quantified public perception using the VADER (Valence Aware Dictionary for Sentiment Reasoning) lexicon to calculate sentiment scores and the NRCLex (National Research Council Canada Lexicon) to calculate emotions scores for the tweets. Next, we explored patterns in public perception of COVID-19 vaccines from March 11, 2020, to September 12, 2021. Then, we compared public perception between two separate periods (i.e., before and after December 11, 2020, when the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization of Pfizer, the first COVID-19 vaccine). Results: In the survey approach, 41% of respondents were Latinx. The most frequent concerns noted for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy were lack of confidence in the vaccine and the state and federal government (46-56%). However, complacency about the seriousness of the COVID-19 vaccines and disease (35%) and convenience or issues in access, travel time, and cost of vaccines (20%) were not associated with decisions regarding COVID-19 vaccination. In the Twitter approach, we found that public sentiment and emotion varied by geography though our findings did not significantly differ for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan residents. Fear was prevalent in the early times when COVID-19 was announced as a pandemic. However, this was quickly taken over by the emotion of trust later as the breakthroughs in COVID-19 vaccines were announced. Specifically, trust peaked on November 9, 2020, when Pfizer announced its vaccine was 90% effective. Then, around December 11, 2020, positive and negative tweet sentiments started diverging more clearly than the extreme sentiment fluctuations before this period.Conclusions: For urban or rural and metropolitan or nonmetropolitan communities, news and social media are potent outlets for health information and can significantly change the public’s perceptions about COVID-19 vaccines. The survey data shows rural residents in the Central Valley of California, predominantly Latinx, have high confidence or trust in healthcare providers, and the county public health department. However, approximately 40% of these rural residents were still unlikely to get vaccinated, similar to rural populations throughout the country. Recommendations to combat COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy amongst Latinx rural residents include leveraging trusted sources such as local doctors, family/friends, and local public health departments to encourage vaccination amongst this population. In addition, Twitter data shows that announcements from the public media or private institutions appear associated with the public’s perception of COVID-19 vaccines, such as the first news of the effectiveness of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine or the notice of blood clot issues caused by the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. Also, there was no significant difference in the mean sentiment or emotion scores between geographical distributions from March 2020 to September 2021. Overall, COVID-19 vaccine news appears to penetrate the public whether people are in urban or rural and metropolitan or nonmetropolitan communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aguilar, Lili Flores;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This Master’s thesis is based on a web-based multimedia project titled, “Soundscapes of Pandemia,” created during the 2020 coronavirus pandemic and global Black Lives Matter uprisings. A question guiding the design of this multimedia project that this Master’s thesis considers is, “How can art and collaborative research design critically engage, with current historic moments?” By critical engagement, I mean how can people actively and carefully consider stimuli such as sounds as a means of producing knowledge about current moments and their relationship to possible futures in the urban environment. As an artist, activist, and researcher, I curate visual illustrations and collage the soundscapes in web-space guided by a decolonial practice of counter- mapping and emergent strategy. A collective of submissions qualified a synesthetic multimedia project expressing counter-hegemonic ontologies in transnational urban contexts of Sao Paulo, Leipzig, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego, ranging from audio files to audio & video files of varying formats and lengths from nine people. A total of 41 files were submitted by the people in the network and were transmitted from smartphone devices and a GoPro camera utilizing broadband fiber connections. I assert that by engaging with actual and virtual media through magical realism is to engage in imagining future possibilities outside of hegemonic hierarchical and temporal orders.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rodriguez, Kaelyn Danielle;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation project identifies the anti-colonial and anti-racist traditions that Black and Brown Angelenos have created, specifically the artworks expressing cultural pride and solidarity with each other. While other scholars have looked at Black and Latina/o/x Los Angeles together, few have looked at the trends and traditions within visual culture and art history. This particular intervention is historical, but also builds from the contemporary moment we live in, where underpaid school teachers have been striking en masse, where women are proclaiming #TimesUp, where Black Lives Matter is ushering perhaps the largest social movement in U.S. history, and still, the movement continues to grow all over the world. Furthermore, this dissertation has been informed by the COVID-19 crisis, which deeply and disproportionately impacts housing, employment, health outcomes and many other factors for people of color, especially Native Peoples, African Americans and Latinx folks in the U.S. As a way to reframe this political moment of pandemics, social injustice, and consciousness raising, I freedom dream through Afro-Latinx Futurism, a concept I offer that empowers Black, Latinx and Afro-Latinx people to center pleasure, rest, and joy as a visual practice in the arts and an important expression of liberation. Together, this project will forge a new history of the past by offering analysis of artworks, but also, moments when people lived, fought and created together. In some cases, I will highlight works of art that were not exactly made together, or directly in conversation with the other, but still work within a constellation of struggle against US imperialism and white supremacy. I have conducted participatory observation fieldwork, interviews, investigated archives, made maps via Emoji Mapping and Social Explorer; I offer visual and historical analysis to demonstrate the social realities that Black and Brown creative communities have forged for the past 237 years in what is now Los Angeles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McGinnis, Ethan Philip;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This essay is comprised of three separate but interconnected sections, each working through at a different level the history of how Southern Illinois came to be called Egypt, and the implications of such a regional nicknaming. In the first, I consider the history of the moniker along with histories of the region through critical discussions of religion, race, and nineteenth century American Egyptomania. In the second, I retrace two cataclysmic events which occurred in Cairo, Illinois, and suggestively implicate by proximity Southern Illinois’ overidentification with Egypt. Finally, I recount and reconsider my own relation to the region and to its history and folklore, and describe my thesis exhibition, which has not yet been mounted due to COVID-19.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    The fifth issue of INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology is the second one we are preparing and publishing in the Covid-19 pandemic. And while the theme for the previous issue was conceived in a world unburdened with what has preoccupied our minds and lives in 2020, the theme for this one is directly shaped by it. During the Spring, when we were taken aback by the governmental measures and the fear of the “invisible enemy” (the use of militant vocabulary is rather prominent in the discourse surrounding the virus), the uncertainty for the future grew strong. However, at that time, we could not predict the longevity, brevity and consequences of the pandemic – in December we are still not certain, but we are getting tired. This is why I would like to thank all the authors for working with us in these trying times, unpacking what can only be a beginning of ‘a global crisis’ during the Summer and Autumn of 2020. The main theme of the issue, Music, Art, and Technology in the Time of Global Crisis, strives to capture this period through the lens of workers in art, music, and academia around the world, focusing on the role and place of arts and technology in our/their relocated institutional realities.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
20 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    We have before us the sixth issue of INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology. This is the second issue in a row dedicated to the global crisis caused by the Covid-19 pandemic. After the overwhelming response from all over the world to the call for papers and provocative inspections that ensued, here we wanted to discuss the ways in which technology shapes and enables work in the areas of music, arts, humanities, and the education process, this time inviting our collaborators to discuss the shortcomings and struggles of the working processes in these fields. The main theme, “Music, Art and Humanities in the Time of Global Crisis”, expanded from the Main Theme section into the interviews as well.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Chatterjee, Avishek; Nardi, Cosimo; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe;
    Country: Netherlands

    Background: Searching through the COVID-19 research literature to gain actionable clinical insight is a formidable task, even for experts. The usefulness of this corpus in terms of improving patient care is tied to the ability to see the big picture that emerges when the studies are seen in conjunction rather than in isolation. When the answer to a search query requires linking together multiple pieces of information across documents, simple keyword searches are insufficient. To answer such complex information needs, an innovative artificial intelligence (AI) technology named a knowledge graph (KG) could prove to be effective. Methods: We conducted an exploratory literature review of KG applications in the context of COVID-19. The search term used was "covid-19 knowledge graph". In addition to PubMed, the first five pages of search results for Google Scholar and Google were considered for inclusion. Google Scholar was used to include non-peer-reviewed or non-indexed articles such as pre-prints and conference proceedings. Google was used to identify companies or consortiums active in this domain that have not published any literature, peer-reviewed or otherwise. Results: Our search yielded 34 results on PubMed and 50 results each on Google and Google Scholar. We found KGs being used for facilitating literature search, drug repurposing, clinical trial mapping, and risk factor analysis. Conclusions: Our synopses of these works make a compelling case for the utility of this nascent field of research.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    In the seventh issue of INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology, we are continuing our series on themes dedicated to art, music, and humanities in times of global crisis. After dealing with more general questions regarding these areas of creation, in this volume we are thinking about the issue of mental and bodily health during the Covid-19 pandemic and its possible ties and representations in music and art.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barth, Theodor;
    Publisher: KHiO
    Country: Norway

    A 6 flyer-set (1HEX): #01—attempt; #02—try again; #03—do something else; #04—return; #05—unlearn; #06—crossover. In this flyer-series, content is queried as a vectored relationship between image and writing. The reference framework is Samuel Beckett’s queries in the “novellas” Ill Seen Ill Said/Company/ Worstward Ho/Stirrings Still (FF—faber & faber). The concept of excavation determines the hatching of content through a work of staging: the performed container. A ontological status is ascribed to such containers: they feature a category of dis/play which is neither an exhibit, nor a show. The lineup (Germ. Ausstellung, Norw. Oppstilling) is discussed as a dis/play in which the nature of what is seen and said is yet undetermined, or uncertain. From this basis the notion that the Beckett estate clusters the signature, event and context—rather than being external to Beckett’s work—is suggested. From this ground the possibility that Covid19 (pandemic and the lockdown as life-work) can fruitfully be considered an estate, is tentatively demonstrated and argued, from the vantage point of terrestrial estates, that may hatch and develop in the wake of Bruno Latour’s work, and Donna Haraway’s scheme of staying with the trouble. Which is also why the geological time-frame (cf, anthropocene) is discussed. Hereby, the /Covid-19 estate/ is launched.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Elena Rodica Danescu; Itzel, Constanze; Douglas, Mccarthy; Delepine, Ludovic; Deschamps, Étienne;
    Country: Luxembourg

    Although the idea of Europe dates back to ancient times and was crystallised in the Enlightenment, the plan for European unification emerged in the second half of the 20th century as a consequence of an economic process based on a single market and a single currency. European integration is therefore a recent chapter in the history of Europe, one which has been written before our very eyes, but it remains fragmented into disparate national histories. In the 21st century, those writing the history of Europe find themselves confronted with a threefold challenge: they must meet the demands of the digital age, adjust to the paradigm shift within the historical discipline and navigate the geopolitical upheavals that the continent has been experiencing since 1989 (the fall of communism; the enlargement of the European Union; the many crises the EU has faced, including Brexit; the divide between institutions and citizens; the socio-economic consequences of the global crisis, including the COVID-19 health crisis; the new nature of transatlantic relations, etc.).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Venzon, Aldreen;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    ABSTRACTObjectives: We aimed to understand the public perception of COVID-19 vaccines using survey and Twitter data. For the survey study, we focused on examining the COVID-19 vaccine perspectives of the rural population in the Central Valley of California, which was predominantly Latinx. Specifically, we looked at the level of trust in the source and content of the vaccine information they received, their view of the safety and effectiveness of vaccines, and their accessibility to vaccines and information at the time when vaccines were readily available to the public. For the Twitter study, we focused on metropolitan and nonmetropolitan communities in the United States and examined tweet sentiment and emotion scores in the early stage of the pandemic and through the public release of the first COVID-19 vaccines. Methods: For the survey data, a total of 900 survey responses were collected in two rural counties in the State of California from March 30 to April 25, 2021. The survey was offered via web and phone in English, Spanish, Punjabi, and Hmong. The respondents were asked about their perceptions of COVID-19 vaccines, messaging, and sources of information. For the Twitter data, we used 127,648 tweets for the analysis after data cleaning, reverse geocoding of tweets, and assigning geographical designations to compare public perception between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. We quantified public perception using the VADER (Valence Aware Dictionary for Sentiment Reasoning) lexicon to calculate sentiment scores and the NRCLex (National Research Council Canada Lexicon) to calculate emotions scores for the tweets. Next, we explored patterns in public perception of COVID-19 vaccines from March 11, 2020, to September 12, 2021. Then, we compared public perception between two separate periods (i.e., before and after December 11, 2020, when the Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency use authorization of Pfizer, the first COVID-19 vaccine). Results: In the survey approach, 41% of respondents were Latinx. The most frequent concerns noted for COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy were lack of confidence in the vaccine and the state and federal government (46-56%). However, complacency about the seriousness of the COVID-19 vaccines and disease (35%) and convenience or issues in access, travel time, and cost of vaccines (20%) were not associated with decisions regarding COVID-19 vaccination. In the Twitter approach, we found that public sentiment and emotion varied by geography though our findings did not significantly differ for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan residents. Fear was prevalent in the early times when COVID-19 was announced as a pandemic. However, this was quickly taken over by the emotion of trust later as the breakthroughs in COVID-19 vaccines were announced. Specifically, trust peaked on November 9, 2020, when Pfizer announced its vaccine was 90% effective. Then, around December 11, 2020, positive and negative tweet sentiments started diverging more clearly than the extreme sentiment fluctuations before this period.Conclusions: For urban or rural and metropolitan or nonmetropolitan communities, news and social media are potent outlets for health information and can significantly change the public’s perceptions about COVID-19 vaccines. The survey data shows rural residents in the Central Valley of California, predominantly Latinx, have high confidence or trust in healthcare providers, and the county public health department. However, approximately 40% of these rural residents were still unlikely to get vaccinated, similar to rural populations throughout the country. Recommendations to combat COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy amongst Latinx rural residents include leveraging trusted sources such as local doctors, family/friends, and local public health departments to encourage vaccination amongst this population. In addition, Twitter data shows that announcements from the public media or private institutions appear associated with the public’s perception of COVID-19 vaccines, such as the first news of the effectiveness of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine or the notice of blood clot issues caused by the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. Also, there was no significant difference in the mean sentiment or emotion scores between geographical distributions from March 2020 to September 2021. Overall, COVID-19 vaccine news appears to penetrate the public whether people are in urban or rural and metropolitan or nonmetropolitan communities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aguilar, Lili Flores;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This Master’s thesis is based on a web-based multimedia project titled, “Soundscapes of Pandemia,” created during the 2020 coronavirus pandemic and global Black Lives Matter uprisings. A question guiding the design of this multimedia project that this Master’s thesis considers is, “How can art and collaborative research design critically engage, with current historic moments?” By critical engagement, I mean how can people actively and carefully consider stimuli such as sounds as a means of producing knowledge about current moments and their relationship to possible futures in the urban environment. As an artist, activist, and researcher, I curate visual illustrations and collage the soundscapes in web-space guided by a decolonial practice of counter- mapping and emergent strategy. A collective of submissions qualified a synesthetic multimedia project expressing counter-hegemonic ontologies in transnational urban contexts of Sao Paulo, Leipzig, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego, ranging from audio files to audio & video files of varying formats and lengths from nine people. A total of 41 files were submitted by the people in the network and were transmitted from smartphone devices and a GoPro camera utilizing broadband fiber connections. I assert that by engaging with actual and virtual media through magical realism is to engage in imagining future possibilities outside of hegemonic hierarchical and temporal orders.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rodriguez, Kaelyn Danielle;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This dissertation project identifies the anti-colonial and anti-racist traditions that Black and Brown Angelenos have created, specifically the artworks expressing cultural pride and solidarity with each other. While other scholars have looked at Black and Latina/o/x Los Angeles together, few have looked at the trends and traditions within visual culture and art history. This particular intervention is historical, but also builds from the contemporary moment we live in, where underpaid school teachers have been striking en masse, where women are proclaiming #TimesUp, where Black Lives Matter is ushering perhaps the largest social movement in U.S. history, and still, the movement continues to grow all over the world. Furthermore, this dissertation has been informed by the COVID-19 crisis, which deeply and disproportionately impacts housing, employment, health outcomes and many other factors for people of color, especially Native Peoples, African Americans and Latinx folks in the U.S. As a way to reframe this political moment of pandemics, social injustice, and consciousness raising, I freedom dream through Afro-Latinx Futurism, a concept I offer that empowers Black, Latinx and Afro-Latinx people to center pleasure, rest, and joy as a visual practice in the arts and an important expression of liberation. Together, this project will forge a new history of the past by offering analysis of artworks, but also, moments when people lived, fought and created together. In some cases, I will highlight works of art that were not exactly made together, or directly in conversation with the other, but still work within a constellation of struggle against US imperialism and white supremacy. I have conducted participatory observation fieldwork, interviews, investigated archives, made maps via Emoji Mapping and Social Explorer; I offer visual and historical analysis to demonstrate the social realities that Black and Brown creative communities have forged for the past 237 years in what is now Los Angeles.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McGinnis, Ethan Philip;
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Country: United States

    This essay is comprised of three separate but interconnected sections, each working through at a different level the history of how Southern Illinois came to be called Egypt, and the implications of such a regional nicknaming. In the first, I consider the history of the moniker along with histories of the region through critical discussions of religion, race, and nineteenth century American Egyptomania. In the second, I retrace two cataclysmic events which occurred in Cairo, Illinois, and suggestively implicate by proximity Southern Illinois’ overidentification with Egypt. Finally, I recount and reconsider my own relation to the region and to its history and folklore, and describe my thesis exhibition, which has not yet been mounted due to COVID-19.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Publisher: Sarajevo : INSAM Institute for Contemporary Artistic Music
    Country: Serbia

    The fifth issue of INSAM Journal of Contemporary Music, Art and Technology is the second one we are preparing and publishing in the Covid-19 pandemic. And while the theme for the previous issue was conceived in a world unburdened with what has preoccupied our minds and lives in 2020, the theme for this one is directly shaped by it. During the Spring, when we were taken aback by the governmental measures and the fear of the “invisible enemy” (the use of militant vocabulary is rather prominent in the discourse surrounding the virus), the uncertainty for the future grew strong. However, at that time, we could not predict the longevity, brevity and consequences of the pandemic – in December we are still not certain, but we are getting tired. This is why I would like to thank all the authors for working with us in these trying times, unpacking what can only be a beginning of ‘a global crisis’ during the Summer and Autumn of 2020. The main theme of the issue, Music, Art, and Technology in the Time of Global Crisis, strives to capture this period through the lens of workers in art, music, and academia around the world, focusing on the role and place of arts and technology in our/their relocated institutional realities.

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