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  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Open Access
  • IE
  • English
  • Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leavy, Susan; Meaney, Gerardine; Wade, Karen; Greene, Derek;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    International Workshop on Algorithmic Bias in Search and Recommendation (Bias 2020), Lisbon, Portugal (held online due to coronavirus outbreak) 14 April 2020 Algorithmic bias has the capacity to amplify and perpetuate societal bias, and presents profound ethical implications for society. Gender bias in algorithms has been identified in the context of employment advertising and recruitment tools, due to their reliance on underlying language processing and recommendation algorithms. Attempts to address such issues have involved testing learned associations, integrating concepts of fairness to machine learning, and performing more rigorous analysis of training data. Mitigating bias when algorithms are trained on textual data is particularly challenging given the complex way gender ideology is embedded in language. This paper proposes a framework for the identification of gender bias in training data for machine learning. The work draws upon gender theory and sociolinguistics to systematically indicate levels of bias in textual training data and associated neural word embedding models, thus highlighting pathways for both removing bias from training data and critically assessing its impact in the context of search and recommender systems. Irish Research Council Science Foundation Ireland

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eschenfelder, Kristin R.; Shankar, Kalpana;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    iConference 2019, Washington, United States of America, March 31- 3 April 2019 We investigate how the term “business model" was used in the digital cultural heritage literature from 2000 to 2015 through content analysis. We found that discussion of business models is not prevalent and there is no observable growth trend. Analysis of how authors represented business models showed predominately positive uses of the concept but include discussion of tension between the concept of business model and traditional cultural heritage field values. We found that non- element representations of business models were most common. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

  • Other research product . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Warren, Graeme; McDermott, Conor; Seaver, Matthew;
    Publisher: Irish Quaternary Association
    Country: Ireland

    The 20th INQUA Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 25-31 July 2019 Glendalough is one of Ireland’s most iconic landscapes, combining stunning scenery with evocative ruined architecture, including distinctively Irish styles such as the round tower. The popular understanding of the valley’s history is that Saint Kevin retreated into the wilderness where he could be closer to God, and that there he founded his monastery which rose to a position of pre-dominance before subsequent decline. This is a powerful story, appealing to important myths about the nature of early Irish Christianity and with a complex relationship with Irish cultural nationalism. However, it is only a partial understanding of the long-term history of how humans have settled the spectacular valley of Glendalough. Glendalough is also often viewed as a natural landscape, but its form is an outcome of the long-term interaction between people and their environment. This brief outline, and fieldtrip, offers a more holistic perspective on this remarkable landscape. Wicklow County Council

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lowney, Brydon; Lokmer, Ivan; Bean, Christopher J.; O'Brien, G. S.; Igoe, M.;
    Publisher: EAGE Publications BV
    Country: Ireland

    80th EAGE Conference & Exhibition 2018, Copenhagen, Denmark, 11-14 June 2018 A seismic image is formed by interactions of the seismic wavefield with geological interfaces, in the form of reflections, diffractions, and other coherent noise. While in conventional processing workflows reflections are favoured over diffractions, this is only beneficial in areas with uniform stratigraphy. Diffractions form as interactions of the wavefield with discontinuities and therefore can be used to image them. However, to image diffractions, they must first be separated from the seismic wavefield. Here we propose a pattern recognition approach for separation, employing image segmentation. We then compare this to two existing diffraction imaging methods, plane-wave destruction and f-k filtering. Image segmentation can be used to divide the image into pixels which share certain criteria. Here, we have separated the image first by amplitude using a histogram-based segmentation method, followed by edge detection with a Sobel operator to locate the hyperbola. The image segmentation method successfully locates diffraction hyperbola which can then be separated and migrated for diffraction imaging. When compared with plane-wave destruction and f-k filtering, the image segmentation method proves beneficial as it allows for identification of the hyperbolae without noise. However, the method can fail to identify hyperbolae in noisier environments and when hyperbolae overlap. Science Foundation Ireland Could not determine copyright holder so left blank - AC

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kearney, Daithi; Commins, Adèle;
    Publisher: Dundalk Institute of Technology
    Country: Ireland

    Irish Traditional Music Concert Featuring the Oriel Traditional Orchestra and the Dundalk Institute of Technology Traditional Music Ensemble

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Institute, Marine;
    Publisher: Marine Institute
    Country: Ireland

    The lesson introduces students to the naming of the Moytirra hydrothermal vents in the mid-Atlantic. The students will learn about how the name that was given to the largest hydrothermal vent was inspired by the Irish legend and story about Balor and the Battle of Moy Tura. The students will learn through readings of myths and legends from Irish culture.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    University of Limerick History Society;
    Publisher: University of Limerick History Society
    Country: Ireland

    peer-reviewed History Studies is a refereed publication of the University of Limerick and is published annually. The cover incorporates the concepts of past, present and future, which is depicted, firstly by the use if the Buddhist symbol Aum. The idea is secondly represented by the illustrative heads looking in different directions. They symbolise the search for history by past, present and future historians

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kearney, Daithi;
    Country: Ireland

    Commissioned by the Oriel Traditional Orchestra with funding from the Cooperation with Northern Ireland Funding Scheme 2018 administered by the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. Inspired by the Oriel region, The Oriel March is for Violin (in two parts), Viola, Cello, Flute, Tin Whistle, Banjo, Mandolin, Harp, Button Accordion, Piano Accordion, Concertina, Uilleann Pipes, Guitar, Piano, Percussion. The five movements are subtitled: 1. MARCHING FROM MAGH MUIRTHEMHNE 2. GOLDEN HOSTAGES 3. GLEANN NA bhFIACH 4. THE JUMPNIG CHURCH 5. ADVANCING ARMIES 5. DAITHÍ'S REEL © 2018 Daithí Kearney, Creative Arts Research Centre at Dundalk Institute of Technology. Performed and recorded under licence by the Oriel Traditional Orchestra. Work developed, under commission, by the Creative Arts Research Centre at Dundalk Institute of Technology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Greene, Derek; Wade, Karen; Leavy, Susan; Meaney, Gerardine;
    Publisher: CEUR-WS.org
    Country: Ireland

    The 5th Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries (DHN2020), Riga, Latvia, 21-23 October 2020 (cancelled due to Coronavirus outbreak) The increasing availability of digital collections of historical texts presents a wealth of possibilities for new research in the humanities. However, the scale and heterogeneity of such collections raises significant challenges when researchers attempt to find and extract relevant content. This work describes Curatr, an online platform that incorporates domain expertise and methods from machine learning to support the exploration and curation of large historical corpora. We discuss the use of this platform in making the British Library Digital Corpus of 18th and 19th century books more accessible to humanities researchers. Irish Research Council Science Foundation Ireland Insight Research Centre

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Norris, Michelle;
    Publisher: University College Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    Simms120 Events in remembrance of Herbert George Simms The period from the early 1930s to mid-1950s was the golden age of social housing in the Republic of Ireland. During these three decades social housing accounted for 55 per cent of all new housing built and the proportion of Irish households accommodated in this sector increased to an all-time high of 18.6 per cent by 1961. Unlike the rest of Western Europe the expansion of Ireland’s social housing sector did not coincide with a golden age of welfare state expansion. Indeed the Ireland’s social housing sector began to stagnate and contract just as its welfare state commenced a late blossoming in the 1970s. This paper looks to financing arrangements to shed light on these atypical patterns of social housing sector expansion and contraction. The argument offered here is that initially the arrangements used to fund social housing in Ireland were very similar to those used in the other Western European countries which constructed large social housing sectors during the twentieth century. However, as this century wore on, the influence of the socio-political pressures which has constrained the growth of the wider Irish welfare state came to bear on the model used to fund social housing and precipitated the end of its golden age.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
13 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Leavy, Susan; Meaney, Gerardine; Wade, Karen; Greene, Derek;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    International Workshop on Algorithmic Bias in Search and Recommendation (Bias 2020), Lisbon, Portugal (held online due to coronavirus outbreak) 14 April 2020 Algorithmic bias has the capacity to amplify and perpetuate societal bias, and presents profound ethical implications for society. Gender bias in algorithms has been identified in the context of employment advertising and recruitment tools, due to their reliance on underlying language processing and recommendation algorithms. Attempts to address such issues have involved testing learned associations, integrating concepts of fairness to machine learning, and performing more rigorous analysis of training data. Mitigating bias when algorithms are trained on textual data is particularly challenging given the complex way gender ideology is embedded in language. This paper proposes a framework for the identification of gender bias in training data for machine learning. The work draws upon gender theory and sociolinguistics to systematically indicate levels of bias in textual training data and associated neural word embedding models, thus highlighting pathways for both removing bias from training data and critically assessing its impact in the context of search and recommender systems. Irish Research Council Science Foundation Ireland

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Eschenfelder, Kristin R.; Shankar, Kalpana;
    Publisher: Springer
    Country: Ireland

    iConference 2019, Washington, United States of America, March 31- 3 April 2019 We investigate how the term “business model" was used in the digital cultural heritage literature from 2000 to 2015 through content analysis. We found that discussion of business models is not prevalent and there is no observable growth trend. Analysis of how authors represented business models showed predominately positive uses of the concept but include discussion of tension between the concept of business model and traditional cultural heritage field values. We found that non- element representations of business models were most common. Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

  • Other research product . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Warren, Graeme; McDermott, Conor; Seaver, Matthew;
    Publisher: Irish Quaternary Association
    Country: Ireland

    The 20th INQUA Congress, Dublin, Ireland, 25-31 July 2019 Glendalough is one of Ireland’s most iconic landscapes, combining stunning scenery with evocative ruined architecture, including distinctively Irish styles such as the round tower. The popular understanding of the valley’s history is that Saint Kevin retreated into the wilderness where he could be closer to God, and that there he founded his monastery which rose to a position of pre-dominance before subsequent decline. This is a powerful story, appealing to important myths about the nature of early Irish Christianity and with a complex relationship with Irish cultural nationalism. However, it is only a partial understanding of the long-term history of how humans have settled the spectacular valley of Glendalough. Glendalough is also often viewed as a natural landscape, but its form is an outcome of the long-term interaction between people and their environment. This brief outline, and fieldtrip, offers a more holistic perspective on this remarkable landscape. Wicklow County Council

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lowney, Brydon; Lokmer, Ivan; Bean, Christopher J.; O'Brien, G. S.; Igoe, M.;
    Publisher: EAGE Publications BV
    Country: Ireland

    80th EAGE Conference & Exhibition 2018, Copenhagen, Denmark, 11-14 June 2018 A seismic image is formed by interactions of the seismic wavefield with geological interfaces, in the form of reflections, diffractions, and other coherent noise. While in conventional processing workflows reflections are favoured over diffractions, this is only beneficial in areas with uniform stratigraphy. Diffractions form as interactions of the wavefield with discontinuities and therefore can be used to image them. However, to image diffractions, they must first be separated from the seismic wavefield. Here we propose a pattern recognition approach for separation, employing image segmentation. We then compare this to two existing diffraction imaging methods, plane-wave destruction and f-k filtering. Image segmentation can be used to divide the image into pixels which share certain criteria. Here, we have separated the image first by amplitude using a histogram-based segmentation method, followed by edge detection with a Sobel operator to locate the hyperbola. The image segmentation method successfully locates diffraction hyperbola which can then be separated and migrated for diffraction imaging. When compared with plane-wave destruction and f-k filtering, the image segmentation method proves beneficial as it allows for identification of the hyperbolae without noise. However, the method can fail to identify hyperbolae in noisier environments and when hyperbolae overlap. Science Foundation Ireland Could not determine copyright holder so left blank - AC

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kearney, Daithi; Commins, Adèle;
    Publisher: Dundalk Institute of Technology
    Country: Ireland

    Irish Traditional Music Concert Featuring the Oriel Traditional Orchestra and the Dundalk Institute of Technology Traditional Music Ensemble

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Institute, Marine;
    Publisher: Marine Institute
    Country: Ireland

    The lesson introduces students to the naming of the Moytirra hydrothermal vents in the mid-Atlantic. The students will learn about how the name that was given to the largest hydrothermal vent was inspired by the Irish legend and story about Balor and the Battle of Moy Tura. The students will learn through readings of myths and legends from Irish culture.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    University of Limerick History Society;
    Publisher: University of Limerick History Society
    Country: Ireland

    peer-reviewed History Studies is a refereed publication of the University of Limerick and is published annually. The cover incorporates the concepts of past, present and future, which is depicted, firstly by the use if the Buddhist symbol Aum. The idea is secondly represented by the illustrative heads looking in different directions. They symbolise the search for history by past, present and future historians

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kearney, Daithi;
    Country: Ireland

    Commissioned by the Oriel Traditional Orchestra with funding from the Cooperation with Northern Ireland Funding Scheme 2018 administered by the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. Inspired by the Oriel region, The Oriel March is for Violin (in two parts), Viola, Cello, Flute, Tin Whistle, Banjo, Mandolin, Harp, Button Accordion, Piano Accordion, Concertina, Uilleann Pipes, Guitar, Piano, Percussion. The five movements are subtitled: 1. MARCHING FROM MAGH MUIRTHEMHNE 2. GOLDEN HOSTAGES 3. GLEANN NA bhFIACH 4. THE JUMPNIG CHURCH 5. ADVANCING ARMIES 5. DAITHÍ'S REEL © 2018 Daithí Kearney, Creative Arts Research Centre at Dundalk Institute of Technology. Performed and recorded under licence by the Oriel Traditional Orchestra. Work developed, under commission, by the Creative Arts Research Centre at Dundalk Institute of Technology.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Greene, Derek; Wade, Karen; Leavy, Susan; Meaney, Gerardine;
    Publisher: CEUR-WS.org
    Country: Ireland

    The 5th Digital Humanities in the Nordic Countries (DHN2020), Riga, Latvia, 21-23 October 2020 (cancelled due to Coronavirus outbreak) The increasing availability of digital collections of historical texts presents a wealth of possibilities for new research in the humanities. However, the scale and heterogeneity of such collections raises significant challenges when researchers attempt to find and extract relevant content. This work describes Curatr, an online platform that incorporates domain expertise and methods from machine learning to support the exploration and curation of large historical corpora. We discuss the use of this platform in making the British Library Digital Corpus of 18th and 19th century books more accessible to humanities researchers. Irish Research Council Science Foundation Ireland Insight Research Centre

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Norris, Michelle;
    Publisher: University College Dublin
    Country: Ireland

    Simms120 Events in remembrance of Herbert George Simms The period from the early 1930s to mid-1950s was the golden age of social housing in the Republic of Ireland. During these three decades social housing accounted for 55 per cent of all new housing built and the proportion of Irish households accommodated in this sector increased to an all-time high of 18.6 per cent by 1961. Unlike the rest of Western Europe the expansion of Ireland’s social housing sector did not coincide with a golden age of welfare state expansion. Indeed the Ireland’s social housing sector began to stagnate and contract just as its welfare state commenced a late blossoming in the 1970s. This paper looks to financing arrangements to shed light on these atypical patterns of social housing sector expansion and contraction. The argument offered here is that initially the arrangements used to fund social housing in Ireland were very similar to those used in the other Western European countries which constructed large social housing sectors during the twentieth century. However, as this century wore on, the influence of the socio-political pressures which has constrained the growth of the wider Irish welfare state came to bear on the model used to fund social housing and precipitated the end of its golden age.

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