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21 Research products, page 1 of 3

  • Other research products
  • 2018-2022
  • Other ORP type
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  • Mémoires en Sciences de l'Information et de la Communication
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  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bocher, Erwan; Petit, Gwendall; Picaut, Judicaël; FORTIN, Nicolas; GUILLAUME, Gwenael;
    Country: France

    Présentation du projet NoiseCapture dans le cadre du séminaire Immersion Sciences 2018, organisé conjointement par l’Académiede Rennes, la région Bretagne et le CNRS.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    ADELE, Sonia; DIONISIO, Corinne;
    Publisher: Springer Open
    Country: France

    Aim: This paper explores the real practices of users of a smart carpooling application that learns their mobility habits and predicts their future trips to propose relevant matches. Method: A combination of usage data and interviews analysis allows us to explore the commuter experience from registration to the first and the next shared rides. Findings: The results highlight the shortcomings associated with human factors in carpooling and with human-smart system interactions. They show that perceptions of practical constraints and poor counterparts are the major reasons for difficulty in incorporating carpooling into daily mobility. Psychosocial barriers take different forms at different steps of the carpooling experience (search for information or guarantees about other users, the necessity of conversing with others, much uncertainty about how to behave). The fact that the service is smart amplifies these problems and reduces the desire to carpool again because it creates new misunderstandings (i.e., the user does not understand what the system vs. the other users do) and discomfort in relation to other riders (no answer, too many refusals, necessity of refusing, negative carpool experience, or concern over proposing a bad carpool). Despite these difficulties, the users perceive carpooling as a good solution and a positive human experience when the matching is accurate. We propose some recommendations to overcome the identified difficulties.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Agier, Lydiane; Basagaña, Xavier; Urquiza, José; Tamayo-Uria, Ibon; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Robinson, Oliver; Siroux, Valérie; Maitre, Léa; de Castro, Montserrat; +17 more
    Publisher: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences - NIEHS
    Country: France

    Background: The exposome is defined as the totality of environmental exposures from conception onwards. It calls for providing a holistic view of environmental exposures and their effects on human health by evaluating multiple environmental exposures simultaneously during critical periods of life.Objective:We evaluated the association of the urban exposome with birth weight.Methods:We estimated exposure to the urban exposome, including the built environment, air pollution, road traffic noise, meteorology, natural space, and road traffic (corresponding to 24 environmental indicators and 60 exposures) for nearly 32,000 pregnant women from six European birth cohorts. To evaluate associations with either continuous birth weight or term low birth weight (TLBW) risk, we primarily relied on the Deletion-Substitution-Addition (DSA) algorithm, which is an extension of the stepwise variable selection method. Second, we used an exposure-by-exposure exposome-wide association studies (ExWAS) method accounting for multiple hypotheses testing to report associations not adjusted for coexposures.Results:The most consistent statistically significant associations were observed between increasing green space exposure estimated as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and increased birth weight and decreased TLBW risk. Furthermore, we observed statistically significant associations among presence of public bus line, land use Shannon's Evenness Index, and traffic density and birth weight in our DSA analysis.Conclusion:This investigation is the first large urban exposome study of birth weight that tests many environmental urban exposures. It confirmed previously reported associations for NDVI and generated new hypotheses for a number of built-environment exposures.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    MENEROUX, Yann; LE GUILCHER, Arnaud; SAINT PIERRE, Guillaume; GHASEMI HAMED, Mohammad; MUSTIERE, Sébastien; ORFILA, Olivier;
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Country: France

    The increasing availability of large-scale global positioning system data stemming from in-vehicle-embedded terminal devices enables the design of methods deriving road network cartographic information from drivers' recorded traces. Some machine learning approaches have been proposed in the past to train automatic road network map inference, and recently this approach has been successfully extended to infer road attributes as well, such as speed limitation or number of lanes. In this paper, we address the problem of detecting traffic signals from a set of vehicle speed profiles, under a classification perspective. Each data instance is a speed versus distance plot depicting over a hundred profiles on a 100-m-long road span. We proposed three different ways of deriving features: The first one relies on the raw speed measurements; the second one uses image recognition techniques; and the third one is based on functional data analysis. We input them into most commonly used classification algorithms, and a comparative analysis demonstrated that a functional description of speed profiles with wavelet transforms seems to outperform the other approaches with most of the tested classifiers. It also highlighted that random forests yield an accurate detection of traffic signals, regardless of the chosen feature extraction method, while keeping a remarkably low confusion rate with stop signs.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lamort-Bouché, Marion; Sarnin, Philippe; Kok, Gerjo; Rouat, Sabrina; Péron, Julien; Letrilliart, Laurent; Fassier, Jean-Baptiste;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: France

    OBJECTIVES: The Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol provides a structured framework to develop, implement and evaluate complex interventions. The main objective of this review was to identify and describe the content of the interventions developed in the field of cancer with the IM protocol. Secondary objectives were to assess their fidelity to the IM protocol and to review their theoretical frameworks. METHODS: Medline, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Pascal, Francis, and BDSP databases were searched. All titles and abstracts were reviewed. A standardized extraction form was developed. All included studies were reviewed by two reviewers blinded to each other. RESULTS: Sixteen studies were identified, and these reported 15 interventions. The objectives were to increase cancer screening participation (n=7), early consultation (n=1) and aftercare / quality of life among cancer survivors (n=7). Six reported a complete participatory planning group and seven described a complete logic model of the problem. Ten studies described a complete logic model of change. The main theoretical frameworks used were the theory of planned behaviour (n=8), the transtheoretical model (n=6), the health belief model (n=6) and the social cognitive theory (n=6). The environment was rarely integrated in the interventions (n=4). Five interventions were reported as effective. CONCLUSIONS: Culturally relevant interventions were developed with the IM protocol that were effective to increase cancer screening and reduce social disparities, particularly when they were developed through a participative approach and integrated the environment. Stakeholders' involvement and the role of the environment were heterogeneously integrated in the interventions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fassier, J B; Sarnin, P; Rouat, S; Péron, J; Kok, G; Letrilliart, L; Lamort-Bouché, M;
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Country: France

    Purposes Intervention mapping (IM) is a protocol for developing effective behavior change interventions. It has been used for 10 years to develop work disability prevention (WDP) interventions, but it is not known to what extent and with what success. The main objective of this study was to review the effectiveness of these interventions. Secondary objectives were to review their fidelity to the IM protocol, their theoretical frameworks and their content. Methods A search strategy was conducted in MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Pascal, Francis, and BDSP. All titles and abstracts were reviewed. A standardized extraction form was developed. All included studies were reviewed by two reviewers blinded to each other. Results Eight WDP interventions were identified aimed at return to work (RTW; n = 6) and self-management at work (n = 2). RTW interventions targeted workers with stress-related mental disorders (n = 1), low back pain (n = 1), musculoskeletal disorders (n = 1), cancer (n = 2) and gynecological surgery (n = 1). The fidelity to the IM protocol was weaker for the participatory planning group. Matrices of change, change methods, and applications were systematically reported. The main theoretical frameworks used were the attitude-social influence-self efficacy model (n = 4) and the theory of planned behavior (n = 2). Half of the interventions included a workplace component (n = 4). Two interventions were reported as effective, and one partially effective. Conclusion The IM protocol is used in WDP since 2007. The participative dimension appears underused. Few theoretical frameworks were used. Implications are to better consider the stakeholders involvement, and mobilize theoretical frameworks with greater attempts to intervene on the work environment.

  • English
    Authors: 
    HAIDAR, Bassem; Da Costa, Pascal; Lepoutre, Jan; Vidal, Fabrice;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    FAEE SEMINAR; Battery Electric Vehicles (BEVs) are essential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions related to the transport sector towards meeting global emissions targets. Although this technology is gaining much attention, techno-economic barriers hinder the widespread of BEVs, namely the high investments, the limited autonomy, and the lack of public-charging infrastructure. A bigger battery leads simultaneously to more autonomy and higher-priced BEV, due to the battery-pack cost. Deploying more public chargers, a solution for limited autonomy BEVs, is facing other obstacles: vehicle-charger adaptability in terms of charging power, and additional investments for charging operators. Therefore, this paper aims to find the most cost-efficient solution(s) of battery capacity and charging power combination(s), considering technoeconomic factors. Based on French travel surveys data, we simulate the needs of 12 scenarios of 5,000 identical privately-purchased BEVs, by changing their battery capacity for both urban and rural areas, before determining the optimal number of charging stations. We then analyze the BEV owner and the charging operator business models in order to conclude with win-win situations for both parties. Results show cheaper investments in charging infrastructure, especially 22 kW charger, rather than in bigger batteries. For urban (rural) areas, purchasing a 35 to 50 kWh BEV (65 kWh BEV for rural) and deploying 22 and 50 kW chargers (50 kW for rural) proves the most cost-efficient and profitable solutions for both BEV owners and charging operators. We finally recommend charging operators to review their charging tariffs, and to take into account the acceptability of customer.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Simon, Gwendal; Darchen, Sébastien; Roitman, Sonia;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France

    Crime and insecurity are deeply entrenched in some cities. While we have rankings of the most dangerous cities in the world, this does not give a clear picture of how and why dangerous spaces develop in cities. We are analysing case studies from cities in France, Colombia, Brazil and Australia to understand the factors that lead to insecurity, and to examine possible solutions.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    LESIEUR, Antoine; MALLET, Vivien; AUMOND, Pierre; CAN, Arnaud;
    Country: France

    In an urban area, it is increasingly common to have access to both a simulated noise map and a sensor network. Merging these two types of information could improve the quality of urban noise maps. In this paper, a data assimilation algorithm is developed to combine data from both a noise map simulator and a network of acoustic sensors. One-hour noise maps are generated with a meta-model fed with hourly traffic and weather data. The data assimilation algorithm merges the simulated map with the sound level measurements into an improved noise map. The performance of this method relies on the accuracy of the meta-model, the input parameters selection and the model of the error covariance that describes how the errors of the simulated sound levels are correlated in space. The performance of the data assimilation is obtained with a leave-one-out cross- validation method. This method shows that the resulting sound maps achieve a reduction of about 30% of the root-mean-square error using 16 sound level meters over an area of 3km?, in our case study conducted in a district of Paris, France.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2019
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bienen, B.; Klinkvort, R.T.; Fan, S.; Black, J.; Bayton, S.; Thorel, L.; Blanc, M.; Madabhushi, G.S.P.; Haigh, S.; Broad, T.; +10 more
    Publisher: ARC
    Countries: France, United Kingdom

    The large diameter monopile is a commonly used foundation concept for offshore wind turbines. The advantages of geometrical simplicity and reliable performance make it often the most attractive solution. Despite the concept's high popularity, optimisation of the current design models can still be made. To address fundamental understanding of modelling effects in centrifuge testing of laterally loaded monopiles in sand, a large coordinated centrifuge-testing program across 11 different centrifuge centres worldwide is ongoing. This extended abstract presents the initial results of global benchmark testing.

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