Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
3,610 Research products, page 1 of 361

  • Research data
  • 2017-2021
  • Restricted
  • ZENODO

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ranucci M; Bianchi P,; Cotza M; Beccaris C; Silvetti S; Isgrò G; Giamberti A; Baryshnikova E.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data set from Ranucci M, Bianchi P, Cotza M, Beccaris C, Silvetti S, Isgrò G, Giamberti A, Baryshnikova E. Fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss in low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery. Perfusion. 2019 Nov;34(8):629-636. doi: 10.1177/0267659119854246. Epub 2019 Jun 28. PMID: 31250738. This is the abstract: Introduction: Low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass are prone to dilution and consumption of soluble coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Low levels of fibrinogen may represent a possible cause of severe postoperative chest drain blood loss. The present study investigates the association between post-cardiopulmonary bypass fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss and severe bleeding, aiming to identify possible cut-off values to trigger specific interventions. Methods: Prospective cohort study on 77 patients weighing <10 kg undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Haemostasis and coagulation data were collected before surgery (standard tests and thromboelastometry), after protamine (thromboelastometry) and at the arrival in the intensive care unit (standard tests). The primary outcome variable was severe bleeding (chest drain blood loss >30 ml kg-1/24h). Results: Factors being independently associated with severe bleeding were the international normalized ratio and the fibrinogen levels at the arrival in the intensive care unit. Once corrected for other confounders, fibrinogen levels had an odds ratio of 0.2 (95% confidence interval = 0.011-0.54) per 1 gL-1 for severe bleeding. The discrimination power was fair (area under the curve = 0.770). The best cut-off value was identified at a fibrinogen level of 150 mg dL-1, with a sensitivity of 52%, a specificity of 85% and a positive predictive value of 60% for severe bleeding. Conclusion: Both a prolonged international normalized ratio and low fibrinogen levels were predictive for severe bleeding, underscoring the role of coagulation factors dilution and consumption in this specific patient population.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Kumar, Dinesh; Raj, Ritu; Dubey, Durgesh; Jain, Avinash; Guleria, Anupam; Kumar, Umesh; Mohit K Rai; Harshit Singh; Saurabh Chaturvedi; Durga P Misra; +2 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Tuberculosis (TB) -a pulmonary granulomatous disease- is the leading cause of death worldwide from a single infectious disease agent especially in developing countries such as India. Current diagnostic methodologies often lack specificity and sensitivity; therefore, there is an immense clinical interest to investigate alternative biomarker signatures for obtaining a conclusive and suggestive diagnosis of TB. Particular challenge arises for treating physicians while differentiating TB from sarcoidosis (SAR) which is an uncommon granulomatous disease and shares the similar clinical, radiological and pathological features with TB. Symptoms common in TB such as cough, fever, fatigue, and weight-loss are often manifested in sarcoidosis as well. As India accounts for more than 26% of global burden of TB cases and epidemiological data about sarcoidosis is unknown, most of the sarcoidosis patients end up receiving anti tubercular therapy (ATT) erroneously, leading to delayed proper treatment and considerable risk of drug induced toxicity, whereas lung damage continues to progress in this backdrop. Therefore, there is an urgent unmet need to identify non-invasive biomarker(s) for differentiating sarcoidosis from TB. Metabolomics analysis of serum holds great potential to provide distinctive patterns of metabolic profiles relevant to underlying disease processes and thus may aid in rapid clinical diagnosis and guiding appropriate treatment. Starting our efforts in this direction, the serum metabolic profiles of sarcoidosis and active TB patients were measured using 800 MHz NMR Spectroscopy and compared using the multivariate and univariate statistical analysis tools. The partial least square discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) revealed significant serum metabolic disparity between SAR and TB with respect to normal control subjects [1-5]. Compared to SAR, the sera of TB patients were characterized by (a) elevated levels of lactate, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), glutamate and succinate (b) decreased levels of glucose, citrate, pyruvate, glutamine, and various lipid and membrane metabolites (such as very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL), polyunsaturated fatty acids, etc.). The altered circulatory levels of glucose (decreased) and lactate (increased) were found well consistent with previous report [6] demonstrating that infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. A very recent study reported increased production of glutamate from mitochondrial glutaminolysis and pleiotropic roles of glutamine metabolism in the metabolic reprogramming of MTb infected M1-like macrophages [7]. A previous study published in Science [8] reported the suppression of oxidative stress by 3HB. Another study published in scientific report demonstrated that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) secretory protein ESAT-induces GLUT-1 mediated enhanced glucose uptake by macrophages and increased fatty acid biosynthesis (to drive foamy macrophage differentiation) which in turn results in release of 3HB in the extracellular environment [9]. Based on previously reported metabolic derangements in MTb infected systems and our results derived from NMR-based serum metabolomics, the following remarks have been drawn: Active TB infection induces Warburg effect as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glucose and elevated levels of lactate Active TB infection causes increased biosynthesis of fatty acids as inferred from the decreased serum levels of citrate and increased levels of acetate and 3-Hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) Active TB infection manipulates oxidative stress (OS) induced pathogen killing host-defense mechanism as inferred from decreased circulatory phenylalanine-to-tyrosine ratio (PTR) and 3HB (known to suppress OS) Active TB infection induces augmented utilization of glutamine (an immunomodulatory nutrient) as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glutamine and increased serum levels of glutamate and succinate Active TB infection induces dyslipidemia as inferred from the decreased NMR signals of very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) References: Dinesh Kumar, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain , Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis” (Conference paper presented during IRACON-2018). F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (DOI: 10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1) Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Ritu Raj, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Targeted nuclear magnetic resonance-based serum metabolomics analysis revealed significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio in pulmonary sarcoidosis patients compared to tuberculosis patients”, (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0034) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit Kumar Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga Prasanna Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based Serum Metabolomics in Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis – Search for a Biomarker”, (Received Best Oral Award) (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0030) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335). Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal, “Diagnostic panel of biomarkers for the assessment of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis identified using NMR based serum metabolomics approach” (Poster Presented during BSRAC-2018) F1000Research (2018), 7:18 (doi: 10.7490/f1000research.1115194.1) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based serum metabolomics in sarcoidosis and tuberculosis: search for a biomarker” (Poster Presentation during British Society for Rheumatology Annual Conference 2018 | BSRAC-2018) Rheumatology (April 2018), Vol 57, Issue suppl_3 (DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/key075.338). Shi, L., Salamon, H., Eugenin, E.A., Pine, R., Cooper, A. and Gennaro, M.L., 2015. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-13. Jiang, Qingkui, and Lanbo Shi. "Coordination of the uptake and metabolism of amino acids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages." Frontiers in Immunology 12 (2021). Shimazu, T., Hirschey, M.D., Newman, J., He, W., Shirakawa, K., Le Moan, N., Grueter, C.A., Lim, H., Saunders, L.R., Stevens, R.D. and Newgard, C.B., 2013. Suppression of oxidative stress by β-hydroxybutyrate, an endogenous histone deacetylase inhibitor. Science, 339(6116), pp.211-214. Singh, V., Kaur, C., Chaudhary, V.K., Rao, K.V. and Chatterjee, S., 2015. M. tuberculosis secretory protein ESAT-6 induces metabolic flux perturbations to drive foamy macrophage differentiation. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-12. {"references": ["Dinesh Kumar*, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain, Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K. Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal*. Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis [version 1; not peer reviewed]. F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (poster) (https://doi.org/10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1)"]}

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Abdul Razak, Siti Fatimah;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data collected from 818 respondents who are licensed drivers in Malaysia.an online survey which was designed to assess drivers perception on advanced driver assistance systems. Questions include a demographic and driving behaviour, the perceptions of benefits and obstacles relevant to the use of advanced driver assistance systems, vehicle decision-making, and technology use.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Folpp, Heath; Schilling, Hayden T.; Clark, Graeme; Lowry, Michael; Maslen, Ben; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Code and Data for Folpp et al (in Review) Artificial reefs increase fish biomass in habitat-limited estuaries

  • Research data . 2019
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Brás, Gonçalo;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Schouten, Stijn; De Boer, Victor; Petram, Lodewijk; Van Erp, Marieke;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The Wind in our Sails. BGB Dutch Asiatic Shipping dataset converted to RDF. Based on Database Dutch-Asiatic Shipping in the 17th and 18th centuries, 1595-1795 (Huygens ING) http://resources.huygens.knaw.nl/das This deposit contains two parts: DAS and NODAS. For each part this contains the resulting RDF triples in separate zip archives as well as scripts used for conversion and linking.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Béduer, Amélie; Bonini, Fabien; Verheyen, Connor; Genta, Martina; Martins, Mariana; Brefie-Guth, Joe; Filippova, Aleksandra; Burch, Patrick; Braschler, Thomas;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Dataset supporting the manuscript "An injectable meta-biomaterial" by the authors of this dataset. Where to start This Zenodo repository contains both raw data and runnable code for the manuscript "An injectable meta-biomaterial". The runnable code is best executed directly at CodeOcean (a link will be configured here upon publication of the manuscript). Alternatively, CodeOcean capsules are Docker images and can be run locally after download and unzipping. The full CodeOcean capsule is stored here as "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial.zip", it contains all the information and data to full reproduce the evaluation underpinning the manuscript "An injectable meta-biomaterial". Quantitative raw data, in the form of text files, Excel files and R-data files useful for the data evaluation are included in "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial.zip". As especially the numerical simulation files are rather voluminous (100GB), we also provide a copy of the capsule without this large part, which however otherwise remains runnable for most evaluations ("CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial_no_raw_simulation.zip"), and, for lightweight documentation of the code section only "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial_code_only.zip". Besides archival of the CodeOcean evaluation capsule, this repository contains additional imaging data from which some of the quantitative data treated in the CodeOcean capsule was extracted, and additionally raw files for the illustrative figures in the manuscript. This data is contained in the files "Raw_images_For_Figure_1.zip", "Raw_images_For_Figure_3.zip", "Raw_images_For_Figure_5.zip", "Raw_images_For_SFigure_4.zip" and "Raw_images_For_SFigure_11.zip". External dependencies To facilitate centralized software development and installation, custom R and Python libraries used by the CodeOcean capsule "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial.zip" are hosted on Github, with releases archived in separate Zenodo repositories. These libraries are included automatically during the build phase of the CodeOcean capsule. This concerns the Python discrete particle simulation particleShear (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589212), and the R packages textureAnalyzerGels (for analysis of mechanical compression curves, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589276), rheologyEvaluation (for analysis of oscillatory sweep rheology, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4594353), particleShearEvaluation (evaluation of the output of the Python simulations, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4594649), plot.counts (convenience functions for scientific plotting, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589498) and reproducibleCalculationTools (numerical comparision of subsequent evaluations to validate reproducibility, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4594515). For automated evaluation of ImageJ macros from Excel files, we also developed an Excel macro runner plugin in ImageJ, termed PoreSizeExcel (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589546). While the R and Python libraries listed above are actively loaded and used by the CodeOcean capsule, we used the PoreSizeExcel ImageJ plugin manually to streamline our quantitative image treatment, but not in a fully automated fashin. The Zenodo archives cited above reproducibly provide the state of the libraries as used for evaluation of this dataset, we continue to develop the libraries and continuously make them available at Github ( at https://github.com/tbgitoo ). Version history This is the second version of this Zenodo repository. We undertook major efforts from version v1.0 to the present version v2.0 to increase reprodubility of evaluation (via the use of the CodeOcean platform) and via separation of generic libraries (listed above, and installable on their own independently of this particular project) from specific project-associated data and evaluation (here). For this reason, while the data is maintained and in part completed due to new experiments having been carried out in the mean time, the structure of the repository has undergone major changes from v1.0 to the present version v2.0.

  • Research data . 2021
    Restricted Hungarian
    Authors: 
    Palkó, Gábor; Indig, Balázs; Fellegi, Zsófia; Sárközi-Lindner, Zsófia;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This object contains only a fraction of the available content for the portal. For further information on the content and for other fractions see: Székelyhon.Please fill in the following form before requesting access to this dataset:ACCES FORM {"references": ["https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3755323"]}

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Juarez Robles, Daniel; Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Mukherjee, Partha P.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Test Sample Specifications Nominal Capacity = 3300 mAh Graphite / NCA Pouch Cell Cycling Protocol Charge: CCCV at 1C up to 4.2 V and a C/20 cutoff current Discharge: CC at 1C down to 2.7 V Cycling Life Number of Cycles = 1265 Aimed Capacity Fade = 10.00 % Actual Capacity Fade = 10.02 %

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Agita Misāne; Jānis Daugavietis;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Intervija topošajam rakstam par Latvijas jauno laiku pagānismu un Skyforger. Notika 'Autentikā', Rīgā. Imants Vovers - grupas pirmais bundzinieks, piedalījies pirmajos divos albūmos.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
3,610 Research products, page 1 of 361
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Ranucci M; Bianchi P,; Cotza M; Beccaris C; Silvetti S; Isgrò G; Giamberti A; Baryshnikova E.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data set from Ranucci M, Bianchi P, Cotza M, Beccaris C, Silvetti S, Isgrò G, Giamberti A, Baryshnikova E. Fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss in low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery. Perfusion. 2019 Nov;34(8):629-636. doi: 10.1177/0267659119854246. Epub 2019 Jun 28. PMID: 31250738. This is the abstract: Introduction: Low-weight (<10 kg) children undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass are prone to dilution and consumption of soluble coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Low levels of fibrinogen may represent a possible cause of severe postoperative chest drain blood loss. The present study investigates the association between post-cardiopulmonary bypass fibrinogen levels and postoperative chest drain blood loss and severe bleeding, aiming to identify possible cut-off values to trigger specific interventions. Methods: Prospective cohort study on 77 patients weighing <10 kg undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Haemostasis and coagulation data were collected before surgery (standard tests and thromboelastometry), after protamine (thromboelastometry) and at the arrival in the intensive care unit (standard tests). The primary outcome variable was severe bleeding (chest drain blood loss >30 ml kg-1/24h). Results: Factors being independently associated with severe bleeding were the international normalized ratio and the fibrinogen levels at the arrival in the intensive care unit. Once corrected for other confounders, fibrinogen levels had an odds ratio of 0.2 (95% confidence interval = 0.011-0.54) per 1 gL-1 for severe bleeding. The discrimination power was fair (area under the curve = 0.770). The best cut-off value was identified at a fibrinogen level of 150 mg dL-1, with a sensitivity of 52%, a specificity of 85% and a positive predictive value of 60% for severe bleeding. Conclusion: Both a prolonged international normalized ratio and low fibrinogen levels were predictive for severe bleeding, underscoring the role of coagulation factors dilution and consumption in this specific patient population.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Kumar, Dinesh; Raj, Ritu; Dubey, Durgesh; Jain, Avinash; Guleria, Anupam; Kumar, Umesh; Mohit K Rai; Harshit Singh; Saurabh Chaturvedi; Durga P Misra; +2 more
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Tuberculosis (TB) -a pulmonary granulomatous disease- is the leading cause of death worldwide from a single infectious disease agent especially in developing countries such as India. Current diagnostic methodologies often lack specificity and sensitivity; therefore, there is an immense clinical interest to investigate alternative biomarker signatures for obtaining a conclusive and suggestive diagnosis of TB. Particular challenge arises for treating physicians while differentiating TB from sarcoidosis (SAR) which is an uncommon granulomatous disease and shares the similar clinical, radiological and pathological features with TB. Symptoms common in TB such as cough, fever, fatigue, and weight-loss are often manifested in sarcoidosis as well. As India accounts for more than 26% of global burden of TB cases and epidemiological data about sarcoidosis is unknown, most of the sarcoidosis patients end up receiving anti tubercular therapy (ATT) erroneously, leading to delayed proper treatment and considerable risk of drug induced toxicity, whereas lung damage continues to progress in this backdrop. Therefore, there is an urgent unmet need to identify non-invasive biomarker(s) for differentiating sarcoidosis from TB. Metabolomics analysis of serum holds great potential to provide distinctive patterns of metabolic profiles relevant to underlying disease processes and thus may aid in rapid clinical diagnosis and guiding appropriate treatment. Starting our efforts in this direction, the serum metabolic profiles of sarcoidosis and active TB patients were measured using 800 MHz NMR Spectroscopy and compared using the multivariate and univariate statistical analysis tools. The partial least square discriminatory analysis (PLS-DA) revealed significant serum metabolic disparity between SAR and TB with respect to normal control subjects [1-5]. Compared to SAR, the sera of TB patients were characterized by (a) elevated levels of lactate, acetate, 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), glutamate and succinate (b) decreased levels of glucose, citrate, pyruvate, glutamine, and various lipid and membrane metabolites (such as very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL), polyunsaturated fatty acids, etc.). The altered circulatory levels of glucose (decreased) and lactate (increased) were found well consistent with previous report [6] demonstrating that infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. A very recent study reported increased production of glutamate from mitochondrial glutaminolysis and pleiotropic roles of glutamine metabolism in the metabolic reprogramming of MTb infected M1-like macrophages [7]. A previous study published in Science [8] reported the suppression of oxidative stress by 3HB. Another study published in scientific report demonstrated that of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) secretory protein ESAT-induces GLUT-1 mediated enhanced glucose uptake by macrophages and increased fatty acid biosynthesis (to drive foamy macrophage differentiation) which in turn results in release of 3HB in the extracellular environment [9]. Based on previously reported metabolic derangements in MTb infected systems and our results derived from NMR-based serum metabolomics, the following remarks have been drawn: Active TB infection induces Warburg effect as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glucose and elevated levels of lactate Active TB infection causes increased biosynthesis of fatty acids as inferred from the decreased serum levels of citrate and increased levels of acetate and 3-Hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) Active TB infection manipulates oxidative stress (OS) induced pathogen killing host-defense mechanism as inferred from decreased circulatory phenylalanine-to-tyrosine ratio (PTR) and 3HB (known to suppress OS) Active TB infection induces augmented utilization of glutamine (an immunomodulatory nutrient) as inferred from the decreased serum levels of glutamine and increased serum levels of glutamate and succinate Active TB infection induces dyslipidemia as inferred from the decreased NMR signals of very-low/low density lipoproteins (VLDL/LDL) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) References: Dinesh Kumar, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain , Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis” (Conference paper presented during IRACON-2018). F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (DOI: 10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1) Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Ritu Raj, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga P Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Targeted nuclear magnetic resonance-based serum metabolomics analysis revealed significantly higher phenylalanine/tyrosine ratio in pulmonary sarcoidosis patients compared to tuberculosis patients”, (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0034) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit Kumar Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga Prasanna Misra, and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based Serum Metabolomics in Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis – Search for a Biomarker”, (Received Best Oral Award) (Conference Paper selected for Oral Presentation in IRACON 2018: OPC0030) Indian J Rheumatol (2018), vol 13 (Issue 6) Suppl S2:79-92 (DOI: 10.4103/0973-3698.247335). Dinesh Kumar, Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal, “Diagnostic panel of biomarkers for the assessment of sarcoidosis and tuberculosis identified using NMR based serum metabolomics approach” (Poster Presented during BSRAC-2018) F1000Research (2018), 7:18 (doi: 10.7490/f1000research.1115194.1) Avinash Jain, Amit Kumar, Harshit Singh, Mohit K Rai, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Anupam Guleria, Alok Nath, Dinesh Kumar, Durga P Misra and Vikas Agarwal, “Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) based serum metabolomics in sarcoidosis and tuberculosis: search for a biomarker” (Poster Presentation during British Society for Rheumatology Annual Conference 2018 | BSRAC-2018) Rheumatology (April 2018), Vol 57, Issue suppl_3 (DOI: 10.1093/rheumatology/key075.338). Shi, L., Salamon, H., Eugenin, E.A., Pine, R., Cooper, A. and Gennaro, M.L., 2015. Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces the Warburg effect in mouse lungs. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-13. Jiang, Qingkui, and Lanbo Shi. "Coordination of the uptake and metabolism of amino acids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages." Frontiers in Immunology 12 (2021). Shimazu, T., Hirschey, M.D., Newman, J., He, W., Shirakawa, K., Le Moan, N., Grueter, C.A., Lim, H., Saunders, L.R., Stevens, R.D. and Newgard, C.B., 2013. Suppression of oxidative stress by β-hydroxybutyrate, an endogenous histone deacetylase inhibitor. Science, 339(6116), pp.211-214. Singh, V., Kaur, C., Chaudhary, V.K., Rao, K.V. and Chatterjee, S., 2015. M. tuberculosis secretory protein ESAT-6 induces metabolic flux perturbations to drive foamy macrophage differentiation. Scientific reports, 5(1), pp.1-12. {"references": ["Dinesh Kumar*, Ritu Raj, Avinash Jain, Anupam Guleria, Umesh Kumar, Mohit K. Rai, Harshit Singh, Saurabh Chaturvedi, Alok Nath, Durga Prasanna Misra, Vikas Agarwal*. Serum based metabolomics analysis revealed highly sensitive and specific panel of metabolic markers for differential diagnosis of Pulmonary Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis [version 1; not peer reviewed]. F1000Research 2019, 8:304 (poster) (https://doi.org/10.7490/f1000research.1116481.1)"]}

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Abdul Razak, Siti Fatimah;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data collected from 818 respondents who are licensed drivers in Malaysia.an online survey which was designed to assess drivers perception on advanced driver assistance systems. Questions include a demographic and driving behaviour, the perceptions of benefits and obstacles relevant to the use of advanced driver assistance systems, vehicle decision-making, and technology use.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Folpp, Heath; Schilling, Hayden T.; Clark, Graeme; Lowry, Michael; Maslen, Ben; Gregson, Marcus; Suthers, Iain M.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Code and Data for Folpp et al (in Review) Artificial reefs increase fish biomass in habitat-limited estuaries

  • Research data . 2019
    Restricted
    Authors: 
    Brás, Gonçalo;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Data

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Schouten, Stijn; De Boer, Victor; Petram, Lodewijk; Van Erp, Marieke;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    The Wind in our Sails. BGB Dutch Asiatic Shipping dataset converted to RDF. Based on Database Dutch-Asiatic Shipping in the 17th and 18th centuries, 1595-1795 (Huygens ING) http://resources.huygens.knaw.nl/das This deposit contains two parts: DAS and NODAS. For each part this contains the resulting RDF triples in separate zip archives as well as scripts used for conversion and linking.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Béduer, Amélie; Bonini, Fabien; Verheyen, Connor; Genta, Martina; Martins, Mariana; Brefie-Guth, Joe; Filippova, Aleksandra; Burch, Patrick; Braschler, Thomas;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Dataset supporting the manuscript "An injectable meta-biomaterial" by the authors of this dataset. Where to start This Zenodo repository contains both raw data and runnable code for the manuscript "An injectable meta-biomaterial". The runnable code is best executed directly at CodeOcean (a link will be configured here upon publication of the manuscript). Alternatively, CodeOcean capsules are Docker images and can be run locally after download and unzipping. The full CodeOcean capsule is stored here as "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial.zip", it contains all the information and data to full reproduce the evaluation underpinning the manuscript "An injectable meta-biomaterial". Quantitative raw data, in the form of text files, Excel files and R-data files useful for the data evaluation are included in "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial.zip". As especially the numerical simulation files are rather voluminous (100GB), we also provide a copy of the capsule without this large part, which however otherwise remains runnable for most evaluations ("CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial_no_raw_simulation.zip"), and, for lightweight documentation of the code section only "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial_code_only.zip". Besides archival of the CodeOcean evaluation capsule, this repository contains additional imaging data from which some of the quantitative data treated in the CodeOcean capsule was extracted, and additionally raw files for the illustrative figures in the manuscript. This data is contained in the files "Raw_images_For_Figure_1.zip", "Raw_images_For_Figure_3.zip", "Raw_images_For_Figure_5.zip", "Raw_images_For_SFigure_4.zip" and "Raw_images_For_SFigure_11.zip". External dependencies To facilitate centralized software development and installation, custom R and Python libraries used by the CodeOcean capsule "CodeOceanCapsule_Injectable_meta_biomaterial.zip" are hosted on Github, with releases archived in separate Zenodo repositories. These libraries are included automatically during the build phase of the CodeOcean capsule. This concerns the Python discrete particle simulation particleShear (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589212), and the R packages textureAnalyzerGels (for analysis of mechanical compression curves, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589276), rheologyEvaluation (for analysis of oscillatory sweep rheology, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4594353), particleShearEvaluation (evaluation of the output of the Python simulations, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4594649), plot.counts (convenience functions for scientific plotting, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589498) and reproducibleCalculationTools (numerical comparision of subsequent evaluations to validate reproducibility, DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4594515). For automated evaluation of ImageJ macros from Excel files, we also developed an Excel macro runner plugin in ImageJ, termed PoreSizeExcel (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4589546). While the R and Python libraries listed above are actively loaded and used by the CodeOcean capsule, we used the PoreSizeExcel ImageJ plugin manually to streamline our quantitative image treatment, but not in a fully automated fashin. The Zenodo archives cited above reproducibly provide the state of the libraries as used for evaluation of this dataset, we continue to develop the libraries and continuously make them available at Github ( at https://github.com/tbgitoo ). Version history This is the second version of this Zenodo repository. We undertook major efforts from version v1.0 to the present version v2.0 to increase reprodubility of evaluation (via the use of the CodeOcean platform) and via separation of generic libraries (listed above, and installable on their own independently of this particular project) from specific project-associated data and evaluation (here). For this reason, while the data is maintained and in part completed due to new experiments having been carried out in the mean time, the structure of the repository has undergone major changes from v1.0 to the present version v2.0.

  • Research data . 2021
    Restricted Hungarian
    Authors: 
    Palkó, Gábor; Indig, Balázs; Fellegi, Zsófia; Sárközi-Lindner, Zsófia;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    This object contains only a fraction of the available content for the portal. For further information on the content and for other fractions see: Székelyhon.Please fill in the following form before requesting access to this dataset:ACCES FORM {"references": ["https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3755323"]}

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Juarez Robles, Daniel; Jeevarajan, Judith A.; Mukherjee, Partha P.;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Test Sample Specifications Nominal Capacity = 3300 mAh Graphite / NCA Pouch Cell Cycling Protocol Charge: CCCV at 1C up to 4.2 V and a C/20 cutoff current Discharge: CC at 1C down to 2.7 V Cycling Life Number of Cycles = 1265 Aimed Capacity Fade = 10.00 % Actual Capacity Fade = 10.02 %

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Agita Misāne; Jānis Daugavietis;
    Publisher: Zenodo

    Intervija topošajam rakstam par Latvijas jauno laiku pagānismu un Skyforger. Notika 'Autentikā', Rīgā. Imants Vovers - grupas pirmais bundzinieks, piedalījies pirmajos divos albūmos.

Send a message
How can we help?
We usually respond in a few hours.